Limits...
Profile of Some Trace Elements in the Liver of Camels, Sheep, and Goats in the Sudan.

Ibrahim IA, Shamat AM, Hussien MO, El Hussein AR - J Vet Med (2013)

Bottom Line: All liver samples were adequate for Fe and Co, whereas only camel liver was adequate for Cu.All liver samples were inadequate compared to free-ranging herbivores.In camels, significant correlation (r (2) = -0.207, P value = 0.04) was detected between Zn and Co, whereas in sheep significant correlation (r (2) = -0.444, P value = 0.026) was detected between Zn and Mn.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Central Laboratory, Ministry of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 7099, Khartoum, Sudan.

ABSTRACT
One hundred camels (Camelus dromedaries) and fifty sheep and goats being adult, male, and apparently healthy field animals were studied to provide data regarding the normal values of some hepatic trace elements. Liver samples were collected during postmortem examination, digested, and analyzed for Cu, Zn, Fe, Co, and Mn using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The results showed that the differences in mean liver concentrations of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Co between camels, sheep, and goats were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Hepatic Cu, Fe, and Co concentrations were higher in camels than in sheep and goats. All liver samples were adequate for Fe and Co, whereas only camel liver was adequate for Cu. In camels, hepatic Zn concentration was inadequately lower than that in sheep and goats. No difference in Mn concentration was detected between camels, sheep, and goats. All liver samples were inadequate compared to free-ranging herbivores. In camels, significant correlation (r (2) = -0.207, P value = 0.04) was detected between Zn and Co, whereas in sheep significant correlation (r (2) = -0.444, P value = 0.026) was detected between Zn and Mn. No significant correlation between trace elements was detected in goats.

No MeSH data available.


Map of the Sudan showing Gezira state and Tampool area (red colour) where liver samples were collected.
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fig1: Map of the Sudan showing Gezira state and Tampool area (red colour) where liver samples were collected.

Mentions: The study area, Al Butana, is part of the central rain lands that provides good grazing for camels, sheep, goats, and cattle stretches from the Ethiopian border in the east to Gezira state in the west roughly occupying the area between isohyets 400 and 700 mm. It comprises 120,000 square kilometers and lies between latitude 13.5°–17.5° N and longitude 32.4°–36.0° E. It is situated in the rich savanna environment (Figure 1).


Profile of Some Trace Elements in the Liver of Camels, Sheep, and Goats in the Sudan.

Ibrahim IA, Shamat AM, Hussien MO, El Hussein AR - J Vet Med (2013)

Map of the Sudan showing Gezira state and Tampool area (red colour) where liver samples were collected.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590859&req=5

fig1: Map of the Sudan showing Gezira state and Tampool area (red colour) where liver samples were collected.
Mentions: The study area, Al Butana, is part of the central rain lands that provides good grazing for camels, sheep, goats, and cattle stretches from the Ethiopian border in the east to Gezira state in the west roughly occupying the area between isohyets 400 and 700 mm. It comprises 120,000 square kilometers and lies between latitude 13.5°–17.5° N and longitude 32.4°–36.0° E. It is situated in the rich savanna environment (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: All liver samples were adequate for Fe and Co, whereas only camel liver was adequate for Cu.All liver samples were inadequate compared to free-ranging herbivores.In camels, significant correlation (r (2) = -0.207, P value = 0.04) was detected between Zn and Co, whereas in sheep significant correlation (r (2) = -0.444, P value = 0.026) was detected between Zn and Mn.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Central Laboratory, Ministry of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 7099, Khartoum, Sudan.

ABSTRACT
One hundred camels (Camelus dromedaries) and fifty sheep and goats being adult, male, and apparently healthy field animals were studied to provide data regarding the normal values of some hepatic trace elements. Liver samples were collected during postmortem examination, digested, and analyzed for Cu, Zn, Fe, Co, and Mn using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The results showed that the differences in mean liver concentrations of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Co between camels, sheep, and goats were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Hepatic Cu, Fe, and Co concentrations were higher in camels than in sheep and goats. All liver samples were adequate for Fe and Co, whereas only camel liver was adequate for Cu. In camels, hepatic Zn concentration was inadequately lower than that in sheep and goats. No difference in Mn concentration was detected between camels, sheep, and goats. All liver samples were inadequate compared to free-ranging herbivores. In camels, significant correlation (r (2) = -0.207, P value = 0.04) was detected between Zn and Co, whereas in sheep significant correlation (r (2) = -0.444, P value = 0.026) was detected between Zn and Mn. No significant correlation between trace elements was detected in goats.

No MeSH data available.