Limits...
Gastrointestinal Helminths in Slaughtered Cattle in Ibadan, South-Western Nigeria.

Adedipe OD, Uwalaka EC, Akinseye VO, Adediran OA, Cadmus SI - J Vet Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, female animals (OR = 1.1; 95% CI: 0.60-1.84) and animals with moderate body condition (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.80-1.79) are more likely to be positive to helminth infection.Our findings reveal that there were helminth infections of both zoonotic and socioeconomic importance among the cattle screened.Considering the impact of the infections on animal production and public health, we advocate that effective prophylactic measures be adopted as a first step to curtail helminth infections of cattle in Nigeria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan 200005, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
As part of an ongoing project to investigate the epidemiology of gastrointestinal helminths of cattle in Nigeria, we carried out a systematic random sampling of cattle slaughtered in a major abattoir in Ibadan, south-western Nigeria. Using sedimentation and floatation methods, we analyzed fecal samples from 397 animals between March and May 2013. Overall, 163 (41.6%) of the animals had at least one gastrointestinal helminth egg, comprising a total of eight helminths from different genera (i.e., four nematodes, three trematodes, and one cestode), with nematode infection being the highest (71.54%). In addition, eggs of four helminths of zoonotic importance were also obtained. Among the cattle examined, the Bunaji breed was the most infected (46%; 69/150). Furthermore, female animals (OR = 1.1; 95% CI: 0.60-1.84) and animals with moderate body condition (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.80-1.79) are more likely to be positive to helminth infection. Our findings reveal that there were helminth infections of both zoonotic and socioeconomic importance among the cattle screened. Considering the impact of the infections on animal production and public health, we advocate that effective prophylactic measures be adopted as a first step to curtail helminth infections of cattle in Nigeria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of gastrointestinal helminth infection among slaughtered cattle in south-western Nigeria.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590849&req=5

fig4: Distribution of gastrointestinal helminth infection among slaughtered cattle in south-western Nigeria.

Mentions: In all, the nature of parasitism among the cattle was observed to range from single to varying mixed infections (Figure 4).


Gastrointestinal Helminths in Slaughtered Cattle in Ibadan, South-Western Nigeria.

Adedipe OD, Uwalaka EC, Akinseye VO, Adediran OA, Cadmus SI - J Vet Med (2014)

Distribution of gastrointestinal helminth infection among slaughtered cattle in south-western Nigeria.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590849&req=5

fig4: Distribution of gastrointestinal helminth infection among slaughtered cattle in south-western Nigeria.
Mentions: In all, the nature of parasitism among the cattle was observed to range from single to varying mixed infections (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: Furthermore, female animals (OR = 1.1; 95% CI: 0.60-1.84) and animals with moderate body condition (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.80-1.79) are more likely to be positive to helminth infection.Our findings reveal that there were helminth infections of both zoonotic and socioeconomic importance among the cattle screened.Considering the impact of the infections on animal production and public health, we advocate that effective prophylactic measures be adopted as a first step to curtail helminth infections of cattle in Nigeria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan 200005, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
As part of an ongoing project to investigate the epidemiology of gastrointestinal helminths of cattle in Nigeria, we carried out a systematic random sampling of cattle slaughtered in a major abattoir in Ibadan, south-western Nigeria. Using sedimentation and floatation methods, we analyzed fecal samples from 397 animals between March and May 2013. Overall, 163 (41.6%) of the animals had at least one gastrointestinal helminth egg, comprising a total of eight helminths from different genera (i.e., four nematodes, three trematodes, and one cestode), with nematode infection being the highest (71.54%). In addition, eggs of four helminths of zoonotic importance were also obtained. Among the cattle examined, the Bunaji breed was the most infected (46%; 69/150). Furthermore, female animals (OR = 1.1; 95% CI: 0.60-1.84) and animals with moderate body condition (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.80-1.79) are more likely to be positive to helminth infection. Our findings reveal that there were helminth infections of both zoonotic and socioeconomic importance among the cattle screened. Considering the impact of the infections on animal production and public health, we advocate that effective prophylactic measures be adopted as a first step to curtail helminth infections of cattle in Nigeria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus