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Participatory Epidemiology of Ethnoveterinary Practices Fulani Pastoralists Used to Manage Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia and Other Cattle Ailments in Niger State, Nigeria.

Alhaji NB, Babalobi OO - J Vet Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Proportions of plant parts used include leaves (47.4%), barks (31.6%), roots (10.6%), and 2.6% of each of rhizomes, fruits, seeds, and whole plants.Of recently used ingredients are kerosene and spent engine oil.Further research into the active ingredients of ethnoveterinary materials and dosages is necessary to guide their usage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria ; Public Health and Epidemiology Unit, Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries Development, Minna, Niger State, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
Ethnoveterinary practices are locally available and affordable to Fulani pastoralists in Niger State, Nigeria, to whom conventional veterinary services are often not readily available and are relatively expensive. This study was designed to identify and document medicinal plant and nonplant materials used by this group in the management of cattle diseases. Participatory rural appraisal tools of checklist, semistructured interview, probing, transect, and triangulations were used to assess Fulani pastoralists existing knowledge on traditional veterinary practices in nine pastoral communities spread across the state. Fifty medicinal materials and seven traditional preventive practices are in use against CBPP and other cattle disease conditions. Of these, 38 (76.0%) are medicinal plants and 12 (24.0%) are nonplant materials (edible earth materials and minerals). Family Fabaceae was most commonly mentioned while leaves were the most common parts used. Most of these materials are administered by drenching with few others mixed with feed. Proportions of plant parts used include leaves (47.4%), barks (31.6%), roots (10.6%), and 2.6% of each of rhizomes, fruits, seeds, and whole plants. Of recently used ingredients are kerosene and spent engine oil. Further research into the active ingredients of ethnoveterinary materials and dosages is necessary to guide their usage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Map of Nigeria showing location of Niger State. (b) Map of Niger State showing the three agroecological zones in the state.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: (a) Map of Nigeria showing location of Niger State. (b) Map of Niger State showing the three agroecological zones in the state.

Mentions: The state shares a common international boundary with the Republic of Benin at its western border and has three agroecological zones, A (Bida zone), B (Minna zone), and C (Kontagora zone), which are based on different climatic conditions in the state [17] (Figure 1).


Participatory Epidemiology of Ethnoveterinary Practices Fulani Pastoralists Used to Manage Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia and Other Cattle Ailments in Niger State, Nigeria.

Alhaji NB, Babalobi OO - J Vet Med (2015)

(a) Map of Nigeria showing location of Niger State. (b) Map of Niger State showing the three agroecological zones in the state.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590846&req=5

fig1: (a) Map of Nigeria showing location of Niger State. (b) Map of Niger State showing the three agroecological zones in the state.
Mentions: The state shares a common international boundary with the Republic of Benin at its western border and has three agroecological zones, A (Bida zone), B (Minna zone), and C (Kontagora zone), which are based on different climatic conditions in the state [17] (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Proportions of plant parts used include leaves (47.4%), barks (31.6%), roots (10.6%), and 2.6% of each of rhizomes, fruits, seeds, and whole plants.Of recently used ingredients are kerosene and spent engine oil.Further research into the active ingredients of ethnoveterinary materials and dosages is necessary to guide their usage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria ; Public Health and Epidemiology Unit, Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries Development, Minna, Niger State, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
Ethnoveterinary practices are locally available and affordable to Fulani pastoralists in Niger State, Nigeria, to whom conventional veterinary services are often not readily available and are relatively expensive. This study was designed to identify and document medicinal plant and nonplant materials used by this group in the management of cattle diseases. Participatory rural appraisal tools of checklist, semistructured interview, probing, transect, and triangulations were used to assess Fulani pastoralists existing knowledge on traditional veterinary practices in nine pastoral communities spread across the state. Fifty medicinal materials and seven traditional preventive practices are in use against CBPP and other cattle disease conditions. Of these, 38 (76.0%) are medicinal plants and 12 (24.0%) are nonplant materials (edible earth materials and minerals). Family Fabaceae was most commonly mentioned while leaves were the most common parts used. Most of these materials are administered by drenching with few others mixed with feed. Proportions of plant parts used include leaves (47.4%), barks (31.6%), roots (10.6%), and 2.6% of each of rhizomes, fruits, seeds, and whole plants. Of recently used ingredients are kerosene and spent engine oil. Further research into the active ingredients of ethnoveterinary materials and dosages is necessary to guide their usage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus