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Subcutaneous Implants of Buprenorphine-Cholesterol-Triglyceride Powder in Mice.

DeTolla L, Sanchez R, Khan E, Tyler B, Guarnieri M - J Vet Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Compared to control animals treated with saline, weight measurements, clinical pathology, histopathology, and clinical observations were unremarkable.These results demonstrate that the lipid carrier is substantially safe.Cholesterol-triglyceride-drug powders may provide a valuable research tool for studies of analgesic and inflammatory drug implants in veterinary medicine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Pathology, Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health and the Program of Comparative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT
Subcutaneous drug implants are convenient systems for the long-term delivery of drugs in animals. Lipid carriers are logical tools because they generally allow for higher doses and low toxicity. The present study used an US Food and Drug Administration Target Animal Safety test system to evaluate the safety of a subcutaneous implant of a cholesterol-triglyceride-buprenorphine powder in 120 BALB/c mice. Mice were evaluated in 4- and 12-day trials with 1- and 5-fold doses of the intended 3 mg/kg dose of drug. One male mouse treated with three 3 mg/kg doses and surgery on days 0, 4, and 8 died on day 9. The cause of death was not determined. In the surviving 119 mice there was no evidence of skin reaction at the site of the implant. Compared to control animals treated with saline, weight measurements, clinical pathology, histopathology, and clinical observations were unremarkable. These results demonstrate that the lipid carrier is substantially safe. Cholesterol-triglyceride-drug powders may provide a valuable research tool for studies of analgesic and inflammatory drug implants in veterinary medicine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pipets for drug powder delivery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590835&req=5

fig1: Pipets for drug powder delivery.

Mentions: Dental pipets were used to deliver 3 mg aliquots of drug powder into a dorsal subcutaneous space created by a surgical procedure (described below). The drug powder was loaded into disposable 30 mm long capped dental pipets by Ora Tech (Riverton UT). The drug-filled pipets were fitted with a nylon plunger to secure the powder prior to injection in the mouse (Figure 1). At the time of surgery, the pipet cap was aseptically removed and the tip of the dental pipet was inserted into the SC space. The nylon plunger was depressed to deposit the powder into the SC space. Five drug loaded pipets were used for the 5x dose groups. To allow for histopathology evaluation of the skin at the implant site, the pipet tips were placed approximately 10 mm under the skin away from the surgical incision.


Subcutaneous Implants of Buprenorphine-Cholesterol-Triglyceride Powder in Mice.

DeTolla L, Sanchez R, Khan E, Tyler B, Guarnieri M - J Vet Med (2014)

Pipets for drug powder delivery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590835&req=5

fig1: Pipets for drug powder delivery.
Mentions: Dental pipets were used to deliver 3 mg aliquots of drug powder into a dorsal subcutaneous space created by a surgical procedure (described below). The drug powder was loaded into disposable 30 mm long capped dental pipets by Ora Tech (Riverton UT). The drug-filled pipets were fitted with a nylon plunger to secure the powder prior to injection in the mouse (Figure 1). At the time of surgery, the pipet cap was aseptically removed and the tip of the dental pipet was inserted into the SC space. The nylon plunger was depressed to deposit the powder into the SC space. Five drug loaded pipets were used for the 5x dose groups. To allow for histopathology evaluation of the skin at the implant site, the pipet tips were placed approximately 10 mm under the skin away from the surgical incision.

Bottom Line: Compared to control animals treated with saline, weight measurements, clinical pathology, histopathology, and clinical observations were unremarkable.These results demonstrate that the lipid carrier is substantially safe.Cholesterol-triglyceride-drug powders may provide a valuable research tool for studies of analgesic and inflammatory drug implants in veterinary medicine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Pathology, Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health and the Program of Comparative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT
Subcutaneous drug implants are convenient systems for the long-term delivery of drugs in animals. Lipid carriers are logical tools because they generally allow for higher doses and low toxicity. The present study used an US Food and Drug Administration Target Animal Safety test system to evaluate the safety of a subcutaneous implant of a cholesterol-triglyceride-buprenorphine powder in 120 BALB/c mice. Mice were evaluated in 4- and 12-day trials with 1- and 5-fold doses of the intended 3 mg/kg dose of drug. One male mouse treated with three 3 mg/kg doses and surgery on days 0, 4, and 8 died on day 9. The cause of death was not determined. In the surviving 119 mice there was no evidence of skin reaction at the site of the implant. Compared to control animals treated with saline, weight measurements, clinical pathology, histopathology, and clinical observations were unremarkable. These results demonstrate that the lipid carrier is substantially safe. Cholesterol-triglyceride-drug powders may provide a valuable research tool for studies of analgesic and inflammatory drug implants in veterinary medicine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus