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Blood Pressure Changes in Relation to Arsenic Exposure in a U.S. Pregnancy Cohort.

Farzan SF, Chen Y, Wu F, Jiang J, Liu M, Baker E, Korrick SA, Karagas MR - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Bottom Line: Pregnancy is a period of particular vulnerability to environmental insults.Outcomes were repeated blood pressure measurements (systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure) recorded during pregnancy.These findings may have important implications because even modest increases in blood pressure impact cardiovascular disease risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Inorganic arsenic exposure has been related to the risk of increased blood pressure based largely on cross-sectional studies conducted in highly exposed populations. Pregnancy is a period of particular vulnerability to environmental insults. However, little is known about the cardiovascular impacts of arsenic exposure during pregnancy.

Objectives: We evaluated the association between prenatal arsenic exposure and maternal blood pressure over the course of pregnancy in a U.S.

Methods: The New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study is an ongoing prospective cohort study in which > 10% of participant household wells exceed the arsenic maximum contaminant level of 10 μg/L established by the U.S. EPA. Total urinary arsenic measured at 24-28 weeks gestation was measured and used as a biomarker of exposure during pregnancy in 514 pregnant women, 18-45 years of age, who used a private well in their household. Outcomes were repeated blood pressure measurements (systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure) recorded during pregnancy.

Results: Using linear mixed effects models, we estimated that, on average, each 5-μg/L increase in urinary arsenic was associated with a 0.15-mmHg (95% CI: 0.02, 0.29; p = 0.022) increase in systolic blood pressure per month and a 0.14-mmHg (95% CI: 0.02, 0.25; p = 0.021) increase in pulse pressure per month over the course of pregnancy.

Conclusions: In our U.S. cohort of pregnant women, arsenic exposure was associated with greater increases in blood pressure over the course of pregnancy. These findings may have important implications because even modest increases in blood pressure impact cardiovascular disease risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Blood pressure measurements over pregnancy by gestational week. For each 2-week period, all systolic blood pressure (A), diastolic blood pressure (B), or pulse pressure (C) measurements during that time were averaged individually for each woman and then averaged across all women and plotted. Error bars represent the 95% CIs. Measurements prior to 6 weeks of gestation were excluded due to few available measurements.
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f1: Blood pressure measurements over pregnancy by gestational week. For each 2-week period, all systolic blood pressure (A), diastolic blood pressure (B), or pulse pressure (C) measurements during that time were averaged individually for each woman and then averaged across all women and plotted. Error bars represent the 95% CIs. Measurements prior to 6 weeks of gestation were excluded due to few available measurements.

Mentions: Because BP increases over the latter part of pregnancy (Cunningham et al. 2010; Miller et al. 2007; Thompson et al. 2007), we further examined whether women with higher urinary arsenic had higher BP at the end of pregnancy, using linear regression models with the outcome, respectively defined as the average of the last three BP measurements (SBP, DBP, PP), adjusting for the same covariate variables. The equation generated from the multivariable linear regression model was also used to graphically represent the relationship between maternal urinary arsenic and SBP at the end of pregnancy, when all covariates are set equal to the median values (Figure 1). In all analyses, p-values < 0.05 were considered significant. All analyses were performed using SAS 9.3 (SAS Institute Inc.).


Blood Pressure Changes in Relation to Arsenic Exposure in a U.S. Pregnancy Cohort.

Farzan SF, Chen Y, Wu F, Jiang J, Liu M, Baker E, Korrick SA, Karagas MR - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Blood pressure measurements over pregnancy by gestational week. For each 2-week period, all systolic blood pressure (A), diastolic blood pressure (B), or pulse pressure (C) measurements during that time were averaged individually for each woman and then averaged across all women and plotted. Error bars represent the 95% CIs. Measurements prior to 6 weeks of gestation were excluded due to few available measurements.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590746&req=5

f1: Blood pressure measurements over pregnancy by gestational week. For each 2-week period, all systolic blood pressure (A), diastolic blood pressure (B), or pulse pressure (C) measurements during that time were averaged individually for each woman and then averaged across all women and plotted. Error bars represent the 95% CIs. Measurements prior to 6 weeks of gestation were excluded due to few available measurements.
Mentions: Because BP increases over the latter part of pregnancy (Cunningham et al. 2010; Miller et al. 2007; Thompson et al. 2007), we further examined whether women with higher urinary arsenic had higher BP at the end of pregnancy, using linear regression models with the outcome, respectively defined as the average of the last three BP measurements (SBP, DBP, PP), adjusting for the same covariate variables. The equation generated from the multivariable linear regression model was also used to graphically represent the relationship between maternal urinary arsenic and SBP at the end of pregnancy, when all covariates are set equal to the median values (Figure 1). In all analyses, p-values < 0.05 were considered significant. All analyses were performed using SAS 9.3 (SAS Institute Inc.).

Bottom Line: Pregnancy is a period of particular vulnerability to environmental insults.Outcomes were repeated blood pressure measurements (systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure) recorded during pregnancy.These findings may have important implications because even modest increases in blood pressure impact cardiovascular disease risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Inorganic arsenic exposure has been related to the risk of increased blood pressure based largely on cross-sectional studies conducted in highly exposed populations. Pregnancy is a period of particular vulnerability to environmental insults. However, little is known about the cardiovascular impacts of arsenic exposure during pregnancy.

Objectives: We evaluated the association between prenatal arsenic exposure and maternal blood pressure over the course of pregnancy in a U.S.

Methods: The New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study is an ongoing prospective cohort study in which > 10% of participant household wells exceed the arsenic maximum contaminant level of 10 μg/L established by the U.S. EPA. Total urinary arsenic measured at 24-28 weeks gestation was measured and used as a biomarker of exposure during pregnancy in 514 pregnant women, 18-45 years of age, who used a private well in their household. Outcomes were repeated blood pressure measurements (systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure) recorded during pregnancy.

Results: Using linear mixed effects models, we estimated that, on average, each 5-μg/L increase in urinary arsenic was associated with a 0.15-mmHg (95% CI: 0.02, 0.29; p = 0.022) increase in systolic blood pressure per month and a 0.14-mmHg (95% CI: 0.02, 0.25; p = 0.021) increase in pulse pressure per month over the course of pregnancy.

Conclusions: In our U.S. cohort of pregnant women, arsenic exposure was associated with greater increases in blood pressure over the course of pregnancy. These findings may have important implications because even modest increases in blood pressure impact cardiovascular disease risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus