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Using Satellite-Based Spatiotemporal Resolved Air Temperature Exposure to Study the Association between Ambient Air Temperature and Birth Outcomes in Massachusetts.

Kloog I, Melly SJ, Coull BA, Nordio F, Schwartz JD - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Bottom Line: Predicted Ta during multiple time windows before birth was negatively associated with birth weight: Average birth weight was 16.7 g lower (95% CI: -29.7, -3.7) in association with an interquartile range increase (8.4 °C) in Ta during the last trimester.Ta over the entire pregnancy was positively associated with PT [odds ratio (OR) = 1.02; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.05] and LBW (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.13).Ta during pregnancy was associated with lower birth weight and shorter gestational age in our study population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geography and Environmental Development, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies looking at air temperature (Ta) and birth outcomes are rare.

Objectives: We investigated the association between birth outcomes and daily Ta during various prenatal exposure periods in Massachusetts (USA) using both traditional Ta stations and modeled addresses.

Methods: We evaluated birth outcomes and average daily Ta during various prenatal exposure periods in Massachusetts (USA) using both traditional Ta stations and modeled address Ta. We used linear and logistic mixed models and accelerated failure time models to estimate associations between Ta and the following outcomes among live births > 22 weeks: term birth weight (≥ 37 weeks), low birth weight (LBW; < 2,500 g at term), gestational age, and preterm delivery (PT; < 37 weeks). Models were adjusted for individual-level socioeconomic status, traffic density, particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), random intercept for census tract, and mother's health.

Results: Predicted Ta during multiple time windows before birth was negatively associated with birth weight: Average birth weight was 16.7 g lower (95% CI: -29.7, -3.7) in association with an interquartile range increase (8.4 °C) in Ta during the last trimester. Ta over the entire pregnancy was positively associated with PT [odds ratio (OR) = 1.02; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.05] and LBW (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.13).

Conclusions: Ta during pregnancy was associated with lower birth weight and shorter gestational age in our study population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of the study area showing the location of a sample subset of mothers [randomly selected with the QGIS tool “random points” (http://www.qgis.org/)], the location of the ground air monitoring stations, and the areas within and outside 30 km of an air temperature station (urban vs. rural areas).
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f1: Map of the study area showing the location of a sample subset of mothers [randomly selected with the QGIS tool “random points” (http://www.qgis.org/)], the location of the ground air monitoring stations, and the areas within and outside 30 km of an air temperature station (urban vs. rural areas).

Mentions: In the analysis we included the entire state of Massachusetts (Figure 1). The study population included all live singleton births > 22 weeks of gestation in Massachusetts from 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2008 (Figure 1). Birth data and the latitude and longitude of each eligible address at birth were provided by the Massachusetts Birth Registry (MBR; http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/departments/dph/programs/admin/dmoa/vitals/). The term birth weight and LBW (< 2,500 g) analyses included 453,658 births ≥ 37 weeks gestational age, and the gestational age and preterm birth (< 37 weeks) analyses included 473,977 births. The study and the use of birth data was approved by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and the human subjects committee of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Informed consent was not required because we used anonymous administrative data.


Using Satellite-Based Spatiotemporal Resolved Air Temperature Exposure to Study the Association between Ambient Air Temperature and Birth Outcomes in Massachusetts.

Kloog I, Melly SJ, Coull BA, Nordio F, Schwartz JD - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Map of the study area showing the location of a sample subset of mothers [randomly selected with the QGIS tool “random points” (http://www.qgis.org/)], the location of the ground air monitoring stations, and the areas within and outside 30 km of an air temperature station (urban vs. rural areas).
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590741&req=5

f1: Map of the study area showing the location of a sample subset of mothers [randomly selected with the QGIS tool “random points” (http://www.qgis.org/)], the location of the ground air monitoring stations, and the areas within and outside 30 km of an air temperature station (urban vs. rural areas).
Mentions: In the analysis we included the entire state of Massachusetts (Figure 1). The study population included all live singleton births > 22 weeks of gestation in Massachusetts from 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2008 (Figure 1). Birth data and the latitude and longitude of each eligible address at birth were provided by the Massachusetts Birth Registry (MBR; http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/departments/dph/programs/admin/dmoa/vitals/). The term birth weight and LBW (< 2,500 g) analyses included 453,658 births ≥ 37 weeks gestational age, and the gestational age and preterm birth (< 37 weeks) analyses included 473,977 births. The study and the use of birth data was approved by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and the human subjects committee of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Informed consent was not required because we used anonymous administrative data.

Bottom Line: Predicted Ta during multiple time windows before birth was negatively associated with birth weight: Average birth weight was 16.7 g lower (95% CI: -29.7, -3.7) in association with an interquartile range increase (8.4 °C) in Ta during the last trimester.Ta over the entire pregnancy was positively associated with PT [odds ratio (OR) = 1.02; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.05] and LBW (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.13).Ta during pregnancy was associated with lower birth weight and shorter gestational age in our study population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geography and Environmental Development, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies looking at air temperature (Ta) and birth outcomes are rare.

Objectives: We investigated the association between birth outcomes and daily Ta during various prenatal exposure periods in Massachusetts (USA) using both traditional Ta stations and modeled addresses.

Methods: We evaluated birth outcomes and average daily Ta during various prenatal exposure periods in Massachusetts (USA) using both traditional Ta stations and modeled address Ta. We used linear and logistic mixed models and accelerated failure time models to estimate associations between Ta and the following outcomes among live births > 22 weeks: term birth weight (≥ 37 weeks), low birth weight (LBW; < 2,500 g at term), gestational age, and preterm delivery (PT; < 37 weeks). Models were adjusted for individual-level socioeconomic status, traffic density, particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), random intercept for census tract, and mother's health.

Results: Predicted Ta during multiple time windows before birth was negatively associated with birth weight: Average birth weight was 16.7 g lower (95% CI: -29.7, -3.7) in association with an interquartile range increase (8.4 °C) in Ta during the last trimester. Ta over the entire pregnancy was positively associated with PT [odds ratio (OR) = 1.02; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.05] and LBW (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.13).

Conclusions: Ta during pregnancy was associated with lower birth weight and shorter gestational age in our study population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus