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Association of Roadway Proximity with Fasting Plasma Glucose and Metabolic Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of Cardiac Catheterization Patients.

Ward-Caviness CK, Kraus WE, Blach C, Haynes CS, Dowdy E, Miranda ML, Devlin RB, Diaz-Sanchez D, Cascio WE, Mukerjee S, Stallings C, Smith LA, Gregory SG, Shah SH, Hauser ER, Neas LM - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Bottom Line: Two categories of metabolic outcomes were studied: measures associated with glucose control, and measures associated with lipid metabolism.Statistical models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status (SES).An interquartile-range (990 m) decrease in distance to roadways was associated with higher fasting plasma glucose (β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% CI: -0.24, 4.59), and the association appeared to be limited to women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84 compared with β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: -3.04, 3.33 in men).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The relationship between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and risk factors for cardiovascular disease needs to be better understood in order to address the adverse impact of air pollution on human health.

Objective: We examined associations between roadway proximity and traffic exposure zones, as markers of TRAP exposure, and metabolic biomarkers for cardiovascular disease risk in a cohort of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 2,124 individuals residing in North Carolina (USA). Roadway proximity was assessed via distance to primary and secondary roadways, and we used residence in traffic exposure zones (TEZs) as a proxy for TRAP. Two categories of metabolic outcomes were studied: measures associated with glucose control, and measures associated with lipid metabolism. Statistical models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status (SES).

Results: An interquartile-range (990 m) decrease in distance to roadways was associated with higher fasting plasma glucose (β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% CI: -0.24, 4.59), and the association appeared to be limited to women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84 compared with β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: -3.04, 3.33 in men). Residence in TEZ 5 (high-speed traffic) and TEZ 6 (stop-and-go traffic), the two traffic zones assumed to have the highest levels of TRAP, was positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; β = 8.36; 95% CI: -0.15, 16.9 and β = 5.98; 95% CI: -3.96, 15.9, for TEZ 5 and 6, respectively).

Conclusion: Proxy measures of TRAP exposure were associated with intermediate metabolic traits associated with cardiovascular disease, including fasting plasma glucose and possibly HDL-C.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Association of glucose control and lipid metabolism outcomes with distance to roadways. Abbreviations: AA, African Americans; BMI, body mass index; EA, European Americans; FPG, fasting plasma glucose; HDL‑C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; HOMA‑IR, homeostatic model assessment method–insulin resistance; HP, health and physical examination; LDL‑C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Forest plots of the association between distance to roadways and metabolic outcomes. Associations are presented as an effect estimate (Beta) for the continuous outcomes and as an OR for the binary outcomes. Associations were scaled so that a 1-unit change corresponds to the IQR (990 m); error bars indicate 95% CIs. Models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking status, socioeconomic status (median house value at census-block level), and BMI. Complete numeric data are provided in Supplemental Material, Table S2.
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f2: Association of glucose control and lipid metabolism outcomes with distance to roadways. Abbreviations: AA, African Americans; BMI, body mass index; EA, European Americans; FPG, fasting plasma glucose; HDL‑C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; HOMA‑IR, homeostatic model assessment method–insulin resistance; HP, health and physical examination; LDL‑C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Forest plots of the association between distance to roadways and metabolic outcomes. Associations are presented as an effect estimate (Beta) for the continuous outcomes and as an OR for the binary outcomes. Associations were scaled so that a 1-unit change corresponds to the IQR (990 m); error bars indicate 95% CIs. Models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking status, socioeconomic status (median house value at census-block level), and BMI. Complete numeric data are provided in Supplemental Material, Table S2.

Mentions: Glucose control and diabetes results. An IQR decrease in the inverse-logarithm transform of distance to roadways was associated with an increase in FPG concentrations [β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval (CI): –0.24, 4.59; p = 0.078] (Figure 2; see also Supplemental Material Table S2). This association was stronger among those with FPG ≥ 126 mg/dL (β = 7.45 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.30, 13.6; p = 0.018), among AA (β = 5.28 mg/dL; 95% CI: –0.17, 10.7; p = 0.058) compared with EA (β = 0.96 mg/dL; 95% CI: –1.61, 3.52; p = 0.47), and among women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84; p = 0.006) compared with men (β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: –3.04, 3.33; p = 0.930).


Association of Roadway Proximity with Fasting Plasma Glucose and Metabolic Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of Cardiac Catheterization Patients.

Ward-Caviness CK, Kraus WE, Blach C, Haynes CS, Dowdy E, Miranda ML, Devlin RB, Diaz-Sanchez D, Cascio WE, Mukerjee S, Stallings C, Smith LA, Gregory SG, Shah SH, Hauser ER, Neas LM - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Association of glucose control and lipid metabolism outcomes with distance to roadways. Abbreviations: AA, African Americans; BMI, body mass index; EA, European Americans; FPG, fasting plasma glucose; HDL‑C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; HOMA‑IR, homeostatic model assessment method–insulin resistance; HP, health and physical examination; LDL‑C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Forest plots of the association between distance to roadways and metabolic outcomes. Associations are presented as an effect estimate (Beta) for the continuous outcomes and as an OR for the binary outcomes. Associations were scaled so that a 1-unit change corresponds to the IQR (990 m); error bars indicate 95% CIs. Models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking status, socioeconomic status (median house value at census-block level), and BMI. Complete numeric data are provided in Supplemental Material, Table S2.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590740&req=5

f2: Association of glucose control and lipid metabolism outcomes with distance to roadways. Abbreviations: AA, African Americans; BMI, body mass index; EA, European Americans; FPG, fasting plasma glucose; HDL‑C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; HOMA‑IR, homeostatic model assessment method–insulin resistance; HP, health and physical examination; LDL‑C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Forest plots of the association between distance to roadways and metabolic outcomes. Associations are presented as an effect estimate (Beta) for the continuous outcomes and as an OR for the binary outcomes. Associations were scaled so that a 1-unit change corresponds to the IQR (990 m); error bars indicate 95% CIs. Models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking status, socioeconomic status (median house value at census-block level), and BMI. Complete numeric data are provided in Supplemental Material, Table S2.
Mentions: Glucose control and diabetes results. An IQR decrease in the inverse-logarithm transform of distance to roadways was associated with an increase in FPG concentrations [β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval (CI): –0.24, 4.59; p = 0.078] (Figure 2; see also Supplemental Material Table S2). This association was stronger among those with FPG ≥ 126 mg/dL (β = 7.45 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.30, 13.6; p = 0.018), among AA (β = 5.28 mg/dL; 95% CI: –0.17, 10.7; p = 0.058) compared with EA (β = 0.96 mg/dL; 95% CI: –1.61, 3.52; p = 0.47), and among women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84; p = 0.006) compared with men (β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: –3.04, 3.33; p = 0.930).

Bottom Line: Two categories of metabolic outcomes were studied: measures associated with glucose control, and measures associated with lipid metabolism.Statistical models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status (SES).An interquartile-range (990 m) decrease in distance to roadways was associated with higher fasting plasma glucose (β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% CI: -0.24, 4.59), and the association appeared to be limited to women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84 compared with β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: -3.04, 3.33 in men).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The relationship between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and risk factors for cardiovascular disease needs to be better understood in order to address the adverse impact of air pollution on human health.

Objective: We examined associations between roadway proximity and traffic exposure zones, as markers of TRAP exposure, and metabolic biomarkers for cardiovascular disease risk in a cohort of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 2,124 individuals residing in North Carolina (USA). Roadway proximity was assessed via distance to primary and secondary roadways, and we used residence in traffic exposure zones (TEZs) as a proxy for TRAP. Two categories of metabolic outcomes were studied: measures associated with glucose control, and measures associated with lipid metabolism. Statistical models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status (SES).

Results: An interquartile-range (990 m) decrease in distance to roadways was associated with higher fasting plasma glucose (β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% CI: -0.24, 4.59), and the association appeared to be limited to women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84 compared with β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: -3.04, 3.33 in men). Residence in TEZ 5 (high-speed traffic) and TEZ 6 (stop-and-go traffic), the two traffic zones assumed to have the highest levels of TRAP, was positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; β = 8.36; 95% CI: -0.15, 16.9 and β = 5.98; 95% CI: -3.96, 15.9, for TEZ 5 and 6, respectively).

Conclusion: Proxy measures of TRAP exposure were associated with intermediate metabolic traits associated with cardiovascular disease, including fasting plasma glucose and possibly HDL-C.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus