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Association of Roadway Proximity with Fasting Plasma Glucose and Metabolic Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of Cardiac Catheterization Patients.

Ward-Caviness CK, Kraus WE, Blach C, Haynes CS, Dowdy E, Miranda ML, Devlin RB, Diaz-Sanchez D, Cascio WE, Mukerjee S, Stallings C, Smith LA, Gregory SG, Shah SH, Hauser ER, Neas LM - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Bottom Line: Two categories of metabolic outcomes were studied: measures associated with glucose control, and measures associated with lipid metabolism.Statistical models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status (SES).An interquartile-range (990 m) decrease in distance to roadways was associated with higher fasting plasma glucose (β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% CI: -0.24, 4.59), and the association appeared to be limited to women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84 compared with β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: -3.04, 3.33 in men).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The relationship between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and risk factors for cardiovascular disease needs to be better understood in order to address the adverse impact of air pollution on human health.

Objective: We examined associations between roadway proximity and traffic exposure zones, as markers of TRAP exposure, and metabolic biomarkers for cardiovascular disease risk in a cohort of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 2,124 individuals residing in North Carolina (USA). Roadway proximity was assessed via distance to primary and secondary roadways, and we used residence in traffic exposure zones (TEZs) as a proxy for TRAP. Two categories of metabolic outcomes were studied: measures associated with glucose control, and measures associated with lipid metabolism. Statistical models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status (SES).

Results: An interquartile-range (990 m) decrease in distance to roadways was associated with higher fasting plasma glucose (β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% CI: -0.24, 4.59), and the association appeared to be limited to women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84 compared with β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: -3.04, 3.33 in men). Residence in TEZ 5 (high-speed traffic) and TEZ 6 (stop-and-go traffic), the two traffic zones assumed to have the highest levels of TRAP, was positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; β = 8.36; 95% CI: -0.15, 16.9 and β = 5.98; 95% CI: -3.96, 15.9, for TEZ 5 and 6, respectively).

Conclusion: Proxy measures of TRAP exposure were associated with intermediate metabolic traits associated with cardiovascular disease, including fasting plasma glucose and possibly HDL-C.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CATHGEN participants in study area. The location of the study area in the state of North Carolina (top right), and the distribution of CATHGEN participants within the study area of Durham, Wake, and Orange counties. The participant locations are overlaid on a map of the primary and secondary roadway network, as well as the traffic exposure zones; the participant locations have been randomized on a small scale to protect confidential patient information while preserving the overall spatial distribution.
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f1: CATHGEN participants in study area. The location of the study area in the state of North Carolina (top right), and the distribution of CATHGEN participants within the study area of Durham, Wake, and Orange counties. The participant locations are overlaid on a map of the primary and secondary roadway network, as well as the traffic exposure zones; the participant locations have been randomized on a small scale to protect confidential patient information while preserving the overall spatial distribution.

Mentions: The Children’s Environmental Health Initiative (http://cehi.snre.umich.edu/) mapped residential addresses to geocoded latitude and longitude for the present study. Individuals were considered successfully geocoded at the street segment level. Of 9,334 individuals enrolled in CATHGEN during the study period, 8,017 (86%) were successfully geocoded, 7,118 (76%) resided in North Carolina, and 2,318 (25%) resided in our study area of Durham, Wake, and Orange counties (Figure 1). For participants whose addresses changed over time, we used the most recent address that was entered into their record before the catheterization. The average time at an address prior to the catheterization procedure according to our records was 587 days.


Association of Roadway Proximity with Fasting Plasma Glucose and Metabolic Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of Cardiac Catheterization Patients.

Ward-Caviness CK, Kraus WE, Blach C, Haynes CS, Dowdy E, Miranda ML, Devlin RB, Diaz-Sanchez D, Cascio WE, Mukerjee S, Stallings C, Smith LA, Gregory SG, Shah SH, Hauser ER, Neas LM - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

CATHGEN participants in study area. The location of the study area in the state of North Carolina (top right), and the distribution of CATHGEN participants within the study area of Durham, Wake, and Orange counties. The participant locations are overlaid on a map of the primary and secondary roadway network, as well as the traffic exposure zones; the participant locations have been randomized on a small scale to protect confidential patient information while preserving the overall spatial distribution.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590740&req=5

f1: CATHGEN participants in study area. The location of the study area in the state of North Carolina (top right), and the distribution of CATHGEN participants within the study area of Durham, Wake, and Orange counties. The participant locations are overlaid on a map of the primary and secondary roadway network, as well as the traffic exposure zones; the participant locations have been randomized on a small scale to protect confidential patient information while preserving the overall spatial distribution.
Mentions: The Children’s Environmental Health Initiative (http://cehi.snre.umich.edu/) mapped residential addresses to geocoded latitude and longitude for the present study. Individuals were considered successfully geocoded at the street segment level. Of 9,334 individuals enrolled in CATHGEN during the study period, 8,017 (86%) were successfully geocoded, 7,118 (76%) resided in North Carolina, and 2,318 (25%) resided in our study area of Durham, Wake, and Orange counties (Figure 1). For participants whose addresses changed over time, we used the most recent address that was entered into their record before the catheterization. The average time at an address prior to the catheterization procedure according to our records was 587 days.

Bottom Line: Two categories of metabolic outcomes were studied: measures associated with glucose control, and measures associated with lipid metabolism.Statistical models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status (SES).An interquartile-range (990 m) decrease in distance to roadways was associated with higher fasting plasma glucose (β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% CI: -0.24, 4.59), and the association appeared to be limited to women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84 compared with β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: -3.04, 3.33 in men).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The relationship between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and risk factors for cardiovascular disease needs to be better understood in order to address the adverse impact of air pollution on human health.

Objective: We examined associations between roadway proximity and traffic exposure zones, as markers of TRAP exposure, and metabolic biomarkers for cardiovascular disease risk in a cohort of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 2,124 individuals residing in North Carolina (USA). Roadway proximity was assessed via distance to primary and secondary roadways, and we used residence in traffic exposure zones (TEZs) as a proxy for TRAP. Two categories of metabolic outcomes were studied: measures associated with glucose control, and measures associated with lipid metabolism. Statistical models were adjusted for race, sex, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status (SES).

Results: An interquartile-range (990 m) decrease in distance to roadways was associated with higher fasting plasma glucose (β = 2.17 mg/dL; 95% CI: -0.24, 4.59), and the association appeared to be limited to women (β = 5.16 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.84 compared with β = 0.14 mg/dL; 95% CI: -3.04, 3.33 in men). Residence in TEZ 5 (high-speed traffic) and TEZ 6 (stop-and-go traffic), the two traffic zones assumed to have the highest levels of TRAP, was positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; β = 8.36; 95% CI: -0.15, 16.9 and β = 5.98; 95% CI: -3.96, 15.9, for TEZ 5 and 6, respectively).

Conclusion: Proxy measures of TRAP exposure were associated with intermediate metabolic traits associated with cardiovascular disease, including fasting plasma glucose and possibly HDL-C.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus