Limits...
Exploring a Little-Known Pathway: Dermal Exposure to Phthalates in Indoor Air.

Konkel L - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Certain phthalate esters used widely in vinyl plastics and other consumer products have been associated with impaired neurodevelopment, altered genital development, and respiratory problems in people... Studies of dermal absorption of phthalates have largely focused on direct contact of the skin with the chemicals, but some models predict that transdermal uptake directly from ambient air may be a potentially important route of exposure... In a series of experiments, six participants were exposed to elevated air concentrations of diethyl phthalate (DEP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DnBP)... DEP is used as a solvent and carrier in personal care products such as cosmetics, perfumes, and shampoos... DnBP is used as a plasticizer in products including nail polish and adhesives. “We chose these particular phthalates because they are ubiquitous in the indoor environment, and their metabolites are commonly found at high levels in human urine,” says lead study author Charles Weschler, an adjunct professor at Rutgers University... Phthalates were introduced into chamber air via aluminum plates coated with a phthalate-spiked paint... From 12 hours before the start of each experiment until 48 hours after exposure ended, each participant followed a strict diet and avoided using personal care products to minimize other exposures to phthalates—an approach that preliminary experiments proved to be successful... Only recently have scientists started to model dermal absorption of indoor air pollutants. “This study, as proof of concept, successfully confirms predictions about that pathway,” says Gerald Kasting, a professor of pharmaceutics and cosmetic science at the University of Cincinnati... DEP and DnBP are not the only indoor organic pollutants predicted to have meaningful uptake via dermal absorption directly from the air... One question raised by the research, Kasting says, is how clothing may impact transdermal chemical uptake... Weschler’s team, in a concurrent study, showed that a participant who donned fresh cotton clothing before entering the chamber had lower urinary phthalate levels than his bare-skinned counterparts... However, the same participant’s urine levels were higher than those of bare-skinned individuals when he put on clothing that had been stored in the chamber for days. “Clothing appears to be able to act either as a barrier or as an amplified source of exposure,” Weschler says.

No MeSH data available.


Previous studies have investigated uptake of phthalates via diet, dust ingestion, inhalation, and direct skin contact with phthalate-containing products. A new study suggests phthalates in ambient air may also pass through our skin.© Dragon Images/Shutterstock
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590739&req=5

d35e117: Previous studies have investigated uptake of phthalates via diet, dust ingestion, inhalation, and direct skin contact with phthalate-containing products. A new study suggests phthalates in ambient air may also pass through our skin.© Dragon Images/Shutterstock


Exploring a Little-Known Pathway: Dermal Exposure to Phthalates in Indoor Air.

Konkel L - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Previous studies have investigated uptake of phthalates via diet, dust ingestion, inhalation, and direct skin contact with phthalate-containing products. A new study suggests phthalates in ambient air may also pass through our skin.© Dragon Images/Shutterstock
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590739&req=5

d35e117: Previous studies have investigated uptake of phthalates via diet, dust ingestion, inhalation, and direct skin contact with phthalate-containing products. A new study suggests phthalates in ambient air may also pass through our skin.© Dragon Images/Shutterstock

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Certain phthalate esters used widely in vinyl plastics and other consumer products have been associated with impaired neurodevelopment, altered genital development, and respiratory problems in people... Studies of dermal absorption of phthalates have largely focused on direct contact of the skin with the chemicals, but some models predict that transdermal uptake directly from ambient air may be a potentially important route of exposure... In a series of experiments, six participants were exposed to elevated air concentrations of diethyl phthalate (DEP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DnBP)... DEP is used as a solvent and carrier in personal care products such as cosmetics, perfumes, and shampoos... DnBP is used as a plasticizer in products including nail polish and adhesives. “We chose these particular phthalates because they are ubiquitous in the indoor environment, and their metabolites are commonly found at high levels in human urine,” says lead study author Charles Weschler, an adjunct professor at Rutgers University... Phthalates were introduced into chamber air via aluminum plates coated with a phthalate-spiked paint... From 12 hours before the start of each experiment until 48 hours after exposure ended, each participant followed a strict diet and avoided using personal care products to minimize other exposures to phthalates—an approach that preliminary experiments proved to be successful... Only recently have scientists started to model dermal absorption of indoor air pollutants. “This study, as proof of concept, successfully confirms predictions about that pathway,” says Gerald Kasting, a professor of pharmaceutics and cosmetic science at the University of Cincinnati... DEP and DnBP are not the only indoor organic pollutants predicted to have meaningful uptake via dermal absorption directly from the air... One question raised by the research, Kasting says, is how clothing may impact transdermal chemical uptake... Weschler’s team, in a concurrent study, showed that a participant who donned fresh cotton clothing before entering the chamber had lower urinary phthalate levels than his bare-skinned counterparts... However, the same participant’s urine levels were higher than those of bare-skinned individuals when he put on clothing that had been stored in the chamber for days. “Clothing appears to be able to act either as a barrier or as an amplified source of exposure,” Weschler says.

No MeSH data available.