Limits...
Just What the Doctor Ordered: Using Parks to Improve Children's Health.

Seltenrich N - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

In addition to myriad health benefits offered by physical activity in general, research has shown that outdoor exercise in nature can enhance emotional well-being and amplify the benefits of physical exercise... And for kids in particular, being in or near green spaces has been found to be associated with better test scores, improved self-discipline and cognition, and reduced behavioral problems and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)... There is this potential that nature can serve as a low-cost, readily available tool for buffering stress... However, since there are few resources in our clinic and many competing needs in the communities we serve, we feel compelled to find the evidence for parks as a health intervention before making assumptions. ” In addition to quantifying health benefits associated with specific interventions, researchers must also identify the mechanisms through which they occur... Physiological and psychological states include increased levels of health-protective factors in the body... Finally, behaviors and conditions include improved sleep and reduced obesity... Among the different mechanisms, Kuo found a common thread that she speculates is central to nature’s health benefits: enhanced immune function... Michael Jerrett, director of the Center for Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of California, Los Angeles, reported in 2012 that access to green spaces was correlated with higher levels of physical activity among youth. “What we were able to show is that minute by minute, when children went into a green area, their odds of being moderately or vigorously physically active went up by about forty percent,” he says. “Our research also shows that when planners design communities smartly with safe routes for walking to green space near homes, children will generally become more active. ” Other studies have suggested that the relationship between parks and physical activity is more complex, hinging on a variety of socioeconomic factors and park characteristics... Their goal is to better understand what gets people into parks and how to improve parks so they attract people. “Just an empty piece of land isn’t going to take someone away from an exciting movie or television show or computer game,” Cohen says. “If we want people to be active and stay healthy, we have to compete with those sort of things. ” Proponents of park prescriptions recognize the challenge. “The battle is just getting over that hurdle of connecting to the outside of our home in a safe, happy, healthy way,” says UBCHO’s Razani. “I feel that we must attach more people to outdoor spaces because it’s in a crisis situation. ” Healthy Parks Healthy People Bay Area, which Razani has played a role in shaping, is the nation’s most comprehensive park-prescription program... They also rarely visit parks, consistent with broader findings about socioeconomic factors and access to green spaces. “I have many, many patients who spend little to no time outside,” he says... Once it is widely established, GWA Park Rx will serve as a laboratory for Ibes’ research on the mental and physical health outcomes of park prescriptions as well as on ways to optimize park-prescription programs more broadly. “It’s really about getting your dose of nature right where you are and integrating it into your daily activities,” she says... While Kaiser Permanente doesn’t direct its doctors to provide park prescriptions or have any plans to do so, it is exploring the idea of developing a resource locator for referring patients to appropriate local parks, Baxter says... Wheeler acknowledges that practical roadblocks exist to full acceptance within the healthcare industry... These include finding a way for providers to bill their time in prescribing parks and, as Liu and others have found, learning how to change the behavior of patients who may be more inclined to take a pill than to visit a park.

No MeSH data available.


These students made their own binoculars to go birdwatching in New York’s Central Park. At 843 acres, Central Park provides a dazzling variety of settings for kids (and adults) to enjoy nature. But even small, simple green spaces, such as tiny pocket parks tucked between city buildings, can offer health benefits.© Frances Roberts/Alamy Stock Photo
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590734&req=5

d35e448: These students made their own binoculars to go birdwatching in New York’s Central Park. At 843 acres, Central Park provides a dazzling variety of settings for kids (and adults) to enjoy nature. But even small, simple green spaces, such as tiny pocket parks tucked between city buildings, can offer health benefits.© Frances Roberts/Alamy Stock Photo


Just What the Doctor Ordered: Using Parks to Improve Children's Health.

Seltenrich N - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

These students made their own binoculars to go birdwatching in New York’s Central Park. At 843 acres, Central Park provides a dazzling variety of settings for kids (and adults) to enjoy nature. But even small, simple green spaces, such as tiny pocket parks tucked between city buildings, can offer health benefits.© Frances Roberts/Alamy Stock Photo
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590734&req=5

d35e448: These students made their own binoculars to go birdwatching in New York’s Central Park. At 843 acres, Central Park provides a dazzling variety of settings for kids (and adults) to enjoy nature. But even small, simple green spaces, such as tiny pocket parks tucked between city buildings, can offer health benefits.© Frances Roberts/Alamy Stock Photo

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

In addition to myriad health benefits offered by physical activity in general, research has shown that outdoor exercise in nature can enhance emotional well-being and amplify the benefits of physical exercise... And for kids in particular, being in or near green spaces has been found to be associated with better test scores, improved self-discipline and cognition, and reduced behavioral problems and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)... There is this potential that nature can serve as a low-cost, readily available tool for buffering stress... However, since there are few resources in our clinic and many competing needs in the communities we serve, we feel compelled to find the evidence for parks as a health intervention before making assumptions. ” In addition to quantifying health benefits associated with specific interventions, researchers must also identify the mechanisms through which they occur... Physiological and psychological states include increased levels of health-protective factors in the body... Finally, behaviors and conditions include improved sleep and reduced obesity... Among the different mechanisms, Kuo found a common thread that she speculates is central to nature’s health benefits: enhanced immune function... Michael Jerrett, director of the Center for Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of California, Los Angeles, reported in 2012 that access to green spaces was correlated with higher levels of physical activity among youth. “What we were able to show is that minute by minute, when children went into a green area, their odds of being moderately or vigorously physically active went up by about forty percent,” he says. “Our research also shows that when planners design communities smartly with safe routes for walking to green space near homes, children will generally become more active. ” Other studies have suggested that the relationship between parks and physical activity is more complex, hinging on a variety of socioeconomic factors and park characteristics... Their goal is to better understand what gets people into parks and how to improve parks so they attract people. “Just an empty piece of land isn’t going to take someone away from an exciting movie or television show or computer game,” Cohen says. “If we want people to be active and stay healthy, we have to compete with those sort of things. ” Proponents of park prescriptions recognize the challenge. “The battle is just getting over that hurdle of connecting to the outside of our home in a safe, happy, healthy way,” says UBCHO’s Razani. “I feel that we must attach more people to outdoor spaces because it’s in a crisis situation. ” Healthy Parks Healthy People Bay Area, which Razani has played a role in shaping, is the nation’s most comprehensive park-prescription program... They also rarely visit parks, consistent with broader findings about socioeconomic factors and access to green spaces. “I have many, many patients who spend little to no time outside,” he says... Once it is widely established, GWA Park Rx will serve as a laboratory for Ibes’ research on the mental and physical health outcomes of park prescriptions as well as on ways to optimize park-prescription programs more broadly. “It’s really about getting your dose of nature right where you are and integrating it into your daily activities,” she says... While Kaiser Permanente doesn’t direct its doctors to provide park prescriptions or have any plans to do so, it is exploring the idea of developing a resource locator for referring patients to appropriate local parks, Baxter says... Wheeler acknowledges that practical roadblocks exist to full acceptance within the healthcare industry... These include finding a way for providers to bill their time in prescribing parks and, as Liu and others have found, learning how to change the behavior of patients who may be more inclined to take a pill than to visit a park.

No MeSH data available.