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Time for a new language for asthma control: results from REALISE Asia.

Price D, David-Wang A, Cho SH, Ho JC, Jeong JW, Liam CK, Lin J, Muttalif AR, Perng DW, Tan TL, Yunus F, Neira G - J Asthma Allergy (2015)

Bottom Line: An online survey of 2,467 patients with asthma from eight Asian countries/regions, aged 18-50 years, showed greater than or equal to two prescriptions in previous 2 years and access to social media.During the previous year, 38% of patients visited the emergency department, 33% were hospitalized, and 73% had greater than or equal to one course of oral corticosteroids.They perceived control as management of exacerbations, reflective of a crisis-oriented mind-set.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK ; Research in Real Life, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Asthma is a global health problem, and asthma prevalence in Asia is increasing. The REcognise Asthma and LInk to Symptoms and Experience Asia study assessed patients' perception of asthma control and attitudes toward treatment in an accessible, real-life adult Asian population.

Patients and methods: An online survey of 2,467 patients with asthma from eight Asian countries/regions, aged 18-50 years, showed greater than or equal to two prescriptions in previous 2 years and access to social media. Patients were asked about their asthma symptoms, exacerbations and treatment type, views and perceptions of asthma control, attitudes toward asthma management, and sources of asthma information.

Results: Patients had a mean age of 34.2 (±7.4) years and were diagnosed with asthma for 12.5 (±9.7) years. Half had the Global Initiative for Asthma-defined uncontrolled asthma. During the previous year, 38% of patients visited the emergency department, 33% were hospitalized, and 73% had greater than or equal to one course of oral corticosteroids. About 90% of patients felt that their asthma was under control, 82% considered their condition as not serious, and 59% were concerned about their condition. In all, 66% of patients viewed asthma control as managing attacks and 24% saw it as an absence of or minimal symptoms. About 14% of patients who correctly identified their controller inhalers had controlled asthma compared to 6% who could not.

Conclusion: Patients consistently overestimated their level of asthma control contrary to what their symptoms suggest. They perceived control as management of exacerbations, reflective of a crisis-oriented mind-set. Interventions can leverage on patients' trust in health care providers and desire for self-management via a new language to generate a paradigm shift toward symptom control and preventive care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Perceptions of asthma control.Notes: Supplementary material: Q1. Asthma sufferers have different definition ideas of what asthma control means to them. Please tell me what you think this phrase “well-controlled asthma” means to you? Data are shown as percentage of respondents, n=2,275.Abbreviations: TCM, traditional Chinese medicine; w/o, without.
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f2-jaa-8-093: Perceptions of asthma control.Notes: Supplementary material: Q1. Asthma sufferers have different definition ideas of what asthma control means to them. Please tell me what you think this phrase “well-controlled asthma” means to you? Data are shown as percentage of respondents, n=2,275.Abbreviations: TCM, traditional Chinese medicine; w/o, without.

Mentions: Figure 2 describes the patients’ view of asthma control. Two-thirds of patients related control to managing attacks: attacks are controllable with medical help (28.2%), no or reduced attacks (16.3%), prevention of attacks through medicines (10.6%), or lifestyle modification, eg, avoidance of triggers (10.4%). About 24.1% saw it as minimal symptoms or impact on normal activities. Figure 3 relates the patients’ perception of asthma to their condition as defined by the GINA7 guidelines.


Time for a new language for asthma control: results from REALISE Asia.

Price D, David-Wang A, Cho SH, Ho JC, Jeong JW, Liam CK, Lin J, Muttalif AR, Perng DW, Tan TL, Yunus F, Neira G - J Asthma Allergy (2015)

Perceptions of asthma control.Notes: Supplementary material: Q1. Asthma sufferers have different definition ideas of what asthma control means to them. Please tell me what you think this phrase “well-controlled asthma” means to you? Data are shown as percentage of respondents, n=2,275.Abbreviations: TCM, traditional Chinese medicine; w/o, without.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590568&req=5

f2-jaa-8-093: Perceptions of asthma control.Notes: Supplementary material: Q1. Asthma sufferers have different definition ideas of what asthma control means to them. Please tell me what you think this phrase “well-controlled asthma” means to you? Data are shown as percentage of respondents, n=2,275.Abbreviations: TCM, traditional Chinese medicine; w/o, without.
Mentions: Figure 2 describes the patients’ view of asthma control. Two-thirds of patients related control to managing attacks: attacks are controllable with medical help (28.2%), no or reduced attacks (16.3%), prevention of attacks through medicines (10.6%), or lifestyle modification, eg, avoidance of triggers (10.4%). About 24.1% saw it as minimal symptoms or impact on normal activities. Figure 3 relates the patients’ perception of asthma to their condition as defined by the GINA7 guidelines.

Bottom Line: An online survey of 2,467 patients with asthma from eight Asian countries/regions, aged 18-50 years, showed greater than or equal to two prescriptions in previous 2 years and access to social media.During the previous year, 38% of patients visited the emergency department, 33% were hospitalized, and 73% had greater than or equal to one course of oral corticosteroids.They perceived control as management of exacerbations, reflective of a crisis-oriented mind-set.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK ; Research in Real Life, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Asthma is a global health problem, and asthma prevalence in Asia is increasing. The REcognise Asthma and LInk to Symptoms and Experience Asia study assessed patients' perception of asthma control and attitudes toward treatment in an accessible, real-life adult Asian population.

Patients and methods: An online survey of 2,467 patients with asthma from eight Asian countries/regions, aged 18-50 years, showed greater than or equal to two prescriptions in previous 2 years and access to social media. Patients were asked about their asthma symptoms, exacerbations and treatment type, views and perceptions of asthma control, attitudes toward asthma management, and sources of asthma information.

Results: Patients had a mean age of 34.2 (±7.4) years and were diagnosed with asthma for 12.5 (±9.7) years. Half had the Global Initiative for Asthma-defined uncontrolled asthma. During the previous year, 38% of patients visited the emergency department, 33% were hospitalized, and 73% had greater than or equal to one course of oral corticosteroids. About 90% of patients felt that their asthma was under control, 82% considered their condition as not serious, and 59% were concerned about their condition. In all, 66% of patients viewed asthma control as managing attacks and 24% saw it as an absence of or minimal symptoms. About 14% of patients who correctly identified their controller inhalers had controlled asthma compared to 6% who could not.

Conclusion: Patients consistently overestimated their level of asthma control contrary to what their symptoms suggest. They perceived control as management of exacerbations, reflective of a crisis-oriented mind-set. Interventions can leverage on patients' trust in health care providers and desire for self-management via a new language to generate a paradigm shift toward symptom control and preventive care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus