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Bioinspiration: something for everyone.

Whitesides GM - Interface Focus (2015)

Bottom Line: 'Bioinspiration'-using phenomena in biology to stimulate research in non-biological science and technology-is a strategy that suggests new areas for research.Beyond its potential to nucleate new ideas, bioinspiration has two other interesting characteristics.It can suggest subjects in research that are relatively simple technically; it can also lead to areas in which results can lead to useful function more directly than some of the more familiar areas now fashionable in chemistry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology , Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138 , USA.

ABSTRACT
'Bioinspiration'-using phenomena in biology to stimulate research in non-biological science and technology-is a strategy that suggests new areas for research. Beyond its potential to nucleate new ideas, bioinspiration has two other interesting characteristics. It can suggest subjects in research that are relatively simple technically; it can also lead to areas in which results can lead to useful function more directly than some of the more familiar areas now fashionable in chemistry. Bioinspired research thus has the potential to be accessible to laboratories that have limited resources, to offer routes to new and useful function, and to bridge differences in technical and cultural interactions of different geographical regions.

No MeSH data available.


A spider alone can inspire innumerable research programmes: roboticists learn from its gait, materials scientists aim to recreate the strength and structure of its silk, and microscopists study its vision. Photograph by Tony Hudson, CC BY-SA 3.0.
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RSFS20150031F8: A spider alone can inspire innumerable research programmes: roboticists learn from its gait, materials scientists aim to recreate the strength and structure of its silk, and microscopists study its vision. Photograph by Tony Hudson, CC BY-SA 3.0.

Mentions: Because there are so many different kinds of organisms, and so many different strategies that have proved successful in biology at solving some functional problem, bioinspiration—as a strategy for developing new ideas—is essentially limitless (figure 8). Experience with biology suggested that almost nothing is simple. High-level functions (e.g. recognizing a face, grazing, swimming) may seem functionally simple, but are supported by layer upon layer of underlying structures, processes and—ultimately—molecules, all interacting with enormous sophistication and complexity. There is no chance that bioinspired research will run out of interesting phenomena to probe.Figure 8.


Bioinspiration: something for everyone.

Whitesides GM - Interface Focus (2015)

A spider alone can inspire innumerable research programmes: roboticists learn from its gait, materials scientists aim to recreate the strength and structure of its silk, and microscopists study its vision. Photograph by Tony Hudson, CC BY-SA 3.0.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590425&req=5

RSFS20150031F8: A spider alone can inspire innumerable research programmes: roboticists learn from its gait, materials scientists aim to recreate the strength and structure of its silk, and microscopists study its vision. Photograph by Tony Hudson, CC BY-SA 3.0.
Mentions: Because there are so many different kinds of organisms, and so many different strategies that have proved successful in biology at solving some functional problem, bioinspiration—as a strategy for developing new ideas—is essentially limitless (figure 8). Experience with biology suggested that almost nothing is simple. High-level functions (e.g. recognizing a face, grazing, swimming) may seem functionally simple, but are supported by layer upon layer of underlying structures, processes and—ultimately—molecules, all interacting with enormous sophistication and complexity. There is no chance that bioinspired research will run out of interesting phenomena to probe.Figure 8.

Bottom Line: 'Bioinspiration'-using phenomena in biology to stimulate research in non-biological science and technology-is a strategy that suggests new areas for research.Beyond its potential to nucleate new ideas, bioinspiration has two other interesting characteristics.It can suggest subjects in research that are relatively simple technically; it can also lead to areas in which results can lead to useful function more directly than some of the more familiar areas now fashionable in chemistry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology , Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138 , USA.

ABSTRACT
'Bioinspiration'-using phenomena in biology to stimulate research in non-biological science and technology-is a strategy that suggests new areas for research. Beyond its potential to nucleate new ideas, bioinspiration has two other interesting characteristics. It can suggest subjects in research that are relatively simple technically; it can also lead to areas in which results can lead to useful function more directly than some of the more familiar areas now fashionable in chemistry. Bioinspired research thus has the potential to be accessible to laboratories that have limited resources, to offer routes to new and useful function, and to bridge differences in technical and cultural interactions of different geographical regions.

No MeSH data available.