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Bioinspiration: something for everyone.

Whitesides GM - Interface Focus (2015)

Bottom Line: 'Bioinspiration'-using phenomena in biology to stimulate research in non-biological science and technology-is a strategy that suggests new areas for research.Beyond its potential to nucleate new ideas, bioinspiration has two other interesting characteristics.It can suggest subjects in research that are relatively simple technically; it can also lead to areas in which results can lead to useful function more directly than some of the more familiar areas now fashionable in chemistry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology , Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138 , USA.

ABSTRACT
'Bioinspiration'-using phenomena in biology to stimulate research in non-biological science and technology-is a strategy that suggests new areas for research. Beyond its potential to nucleate new ideas, bioinspiration has two other interesting characteristics. It can suggest subjects in research that are relatively simple technically; it can also lead to areas in which results can lead to useful function more directly than some of the more familiar areas now fashionable in chemistry. Bioinspired research thus has the potential to be accessible to laboratories that have limited resources, to offer routes to new and useful function, and to bridge differences in technical and cultural interactions of different geographical regions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A starfish may not use its appendages to grip objects, but its form inspires mechanical structures that do. Pneumatically actuated soft robotic grippers, which resemble the shape of a starfish, can gently pick up and release an uncooked egg and other fragile, irregularly shaped objects with ease [22].
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RSFS20150031F5: A starfish may not use its appendages to grip objects, but its form inspires mechanical structures that do. Pneumatically actuated soft robotic grippers, which resemble the shape of a starfish, can gently pick up and release an uncooked egg and other fragile, irregularly shaped objects with ease [22].

Mentions: Remarkably, the methods developed for microfluidic systems could be used, almost without modification, in another area with a strong basis in bioinspiration: that is, soft robotics (figure 5) [22,23]. The interest in this area is with structures with much larger dimensions than those important for SAMs and microfluidics. Two observations served as the starting inspiration for this now rapidly developing field. (i) Robotics based on mimicking and augmenting the motions and characteristics of large mammals had become a well-established and important field (especially in manufacturing). These robots were typically fabricated in metals, and actuated electrically or hydraulically; they were designed to accomplish tasks that required large forces and high speeds; they were heavy and expensive; they were dangerous for humans. (ii) Most of the organisms found on Earth are, of course, not large mammals, and do not have the body plans of dogs or humans; they are, instead, soft: worms, squid, spiders and most of the other, most prevalent forms of life. Our initial efforts in soft robotics were based loosely on the inspiration provided by starfish, and were designed to make simple grippers. The mechanism of actuation in these ‘starfish grippers' involved pneumatically inflated networks of microchannels embedded in PDMS (‘PneuNets'), designed so that inflation resulted in anisotropic motion [24].Figure 5.


Bioinspiration: something for everyone.

Whitesides GM - Interface Focus (2015)

A starfish may not use its appendages to grip objects, but its form inspires mechanical structures that do. Pneumatically actuated soft robotic grippers, which resemble the shape of a starfish, can gently pick up and release an uncooked egg and other fragile, irregularly shaped objects with ease [22].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590425&req=5

RSFS20150031F5: A starfish may not use its appendages to grip objects, but its form inspires mechanical structures that do. Pneumatically actuated soft robotic grippers, which resemble the shape of a starfish, can gently pick up and release an uncooked egg and other fragile, irregularly shaped objects with ease [22].
Mentions: Remarkably, the methods developed for microfluidic systems could be used, almost without modification, in another area with a strong basis in bioinspiration: that is, soft robotics (figure 5) [22,23]. The interest in this area is with structures with much larger dimensions than those important for SAMs and microfluidics. Two observations served as the starting inspiration for this now rapidly developing field. (i) Robotics based on mimicking and augmenting the motions and characteristics of large mammals had become a well-established and important field (especially in manufacturing). These robots were typically fabricated in metals, and actuated electrically or hydraulically; they were designed to accomplish tasks that required large forces and high speeds; they were heavy and expensive; they were dangerous for humans. (ii) Most of the organisms found on Earth are, of course, not large mammals, and do not have the body plans of dogs or humans; they are, instead, soft: worms, squid, spiders and most of the other, most prevalent forms of life. Our initial efforts in soft robotics were based loosely on the inspiration provided by starfish, and were designed to make simple grippers. The mechanism of actuation in these ‘starfish grippers' involved pneumatically inflated networks of microchannels embedded in PDMS (‘PneuNets'), designed so that inflation resulted in anisotropic motion [24].Figure 5.

Bottom Line: 'Bioinspiration'-using phenomena in biology to stimulate research in non-biological science and technology-is a strategy that suggests new areas for research.Beyond its potential to nucleate new ideas, bioinspiration has two other interesting characteristics.It can suggest subjects in research that are relatively simple technically; it can also lead to areas in which results can lead to useful function more directly than some of the more familiar areas now fashionable in chemistry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology , Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138 , USA.

ABSTRACT
'Bioinspiration'-using phenomena in biology to stimulate research in non-biological science and technology-is a strategy that suggests new areas for research. Beyond its potential to nucleate new ideas, bioinspiration has two other interesting characteristics. It can suggest subjects in research that are relatively simple technically; it can also lead to areas in which results can lead to useful function more directly than some of the more familiar areas now fashionable in chemistry. Bioinspired research thus has the potential to be accessible to laboratories that have limited resources, to offer routes to new and useful function, and to bridge differences in technical and cultural interactions of different geographical regions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus