Limits...
Climbing with adhesion: from bioinspiration to biounderstanding.

Cutkosky MR - Interface Focus (2015)

Bottom Line: In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties.The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important.Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering , Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305 , USA.

ABSTRACT
Bioinspiration is an increasingly popular design paradigm, especially as robots venture out of the laboratory and into the world. Animals are adept at coping with the variability that the world imposes. With advances in scientific tools for understanding biological structures in detail, we are increasingly able to identify design features that account for animals' robust performance. In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties. The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important. Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Typical landing force trajectory plotted with respect to allowable contact forces for an adhesive gripper with three pads. (b) Detail of forces projected in normal/tangential plane showing the safety factor for maximum rebound force. (Adapted from [34].)
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RSFS20150015F8: (a) Typical landing force trajectory plotted with respect to allowable contact forces for an adhesive gripper with three pads. (b) Detail of forces projected in normal/tangential plane showing the safety factor for maximum rebound force. (Adapted from [34].)

Mentions: As in the case of a climbing robot or gecko, the adhesion limit in force space provides insights into motion planning and mechanism design. In this case, we compare dynamic landing forces to a three-dimensional space of allowable forces in the normal, tangential and lateral directions. Figure 8 shows the forces associated with a typical quadrotor landing on a flat inverted surface. At first contact, the force quickly increases from zero to a maximum impact force. Subsequently, the contact force becomes negative as the quadrotor rebounds. The landing mechanism is designed to withstand such forces with some safety margin.Figure 8.


Climbing with adhesion: from bioinspiration to biounderstanding.

Cutkosky MR - Interface Focus (2015)

(a) Typical landing force trajectory plotted with respect to allowable contact forces for an adhesive gripper with three pads. (b) Detail of forces projected in normal/tangential plane showing the safety factor for maximum rebound force. (Adapted from [34].)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590421&req=5

RSFS20150015F8: (a) Typical landing force trajectory plotted with respect to allowable contact forces for an adhesive gripper with three pads. (b) Detail of forces projected in normal/tangential plane showing the safety factor for maximum rebound force. (Adapted from [34].)
Mentions: As in the case of a climbing robot or gecko, the adhesion limit in force space provides insights into motion planning and mechanism design. In this case, we compare dynamic landing forces to a three-dimensional space of allowable forces in the normal, tangential and lateral directions. Figure 8 shows the forces associated with a typical quadrotor landing on a flat inverted surface. At first contact, the force quickly increases from zero to a maximum impact force. Subsequently, the contact force becomes negative as the quadrotor rebounds. The landing mechanism is designed to withstand such forces with some safety margin.Figure 8.

Bottom Line: In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties.The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important.Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering , Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305 , USA.

ABSTRACT
Bioinspiration is an increasingly popular design paradigm, especially as robots venture out of the laboratory and into the world. Animals are adept at coping with the variability that the world imposes. With advances in scientific tools for understanding biological structures in detail, we are increasingly able to identify design features that account for animals' robust performance. In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties. The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important. Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus