Limits...
Climbing with adhesion: from bioinspiration to biounderstanding.

Cutkosky MR - Interface Focus (2015)

Bottom Line: In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties.The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important.Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering , Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305 , USA.

ABSTRACT
Bioinspiration is an increasingly popular design paradigm, especially as robots venture out of the laboratory and into the world. Animals are adept at coping with the variability that the world imposes. With advances in scientific tools for understanding biological structures in detail, we are increasingly able to identify design features that account for animals' robust performance. In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties. The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important. Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

No MeSH data available.


A bioinspired design process for a climbing robot. Insights arise from hypotheses about how complex biological systems can be simplified while preserving important functional attributes. Multi-material prototyping processes (e.g. SDM) make it possible to produce bioinspired robots that embody some of these principles. Testing invariably leads to refinement of the hypotheses.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590421&req=5

RSFS20150015F3: A bioinspired design process for a climbing robot. Insights arise from hypotheses about how complex biological systems can be simplified while preserving important functional attributes. Multi-material prototyping processes (e.g. SDM) make it possible to produce bioinspired robots that embody some of these principles. Testing invariably leads to refinement of the hypotheses.

Mentions: In 2006, a team of roboticists and biologists from Stanford, Berkeley, Lewis & Clark College, the University of Pennsylvania, Carnegie Mellon and Boston Dynamics, Inc., were engaged in a project on bioinspired climbing robots. The team's process of adapting biological insights into engineering solutions is depicted in figure 3. It begins with an examination of various animals that, in this case, can climb smooth vertical surfaces with agility. Possible exemplars include geckos, lizards, spiders and insects. Among these animals, insects stand out for their ability to run up surfaces using tiny spines on their legs and geckos stand out for their ability to run up both rough and smooth surfaces using adhesion.FigureĀ 3.


Climbing with adhesion: from bioinspiration to biounderstanding.

Cutkosky MR - Interface Focus (2015)

A bioinspired design process for a climbing robot. Insights arise from hypotheses about how complex biological systems can be simplified while preserving important functional attributes. Multi-material prototyping processes (e.g. SDM) make it possible to produce bioinspired robots that embody some of these principles. Testing invariably leads to refinement of the hypotheses.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590421&req=5

RSFS20150015F3: A bioinspired design process for a climbing robot. Insights arise from hypotheses about how complex biological systems can be simplified while preserving important functional attributes. Multi-material prototyping processes (e.g. SDM) make it possible to produce bioinspired robots that embody some of these principles. Testing invariably leads to refinement of the hypotheses.
Mentions: In 2006, a team of roboticists and biologists from Stanford, Berkeley, Lewis & Clark College, the University of Pennsylvania, Carnegie Mellon and Boston Dynamics, Inc., were engaged in a project on bioinspired climbing robots. The team's process of adapting biological insights into engineering solutions is depicted in figure 3. It begins with an examination of various animals that, in this case, can climb smooth vertical surfaces with agility. Possible exemplars include geckos, lizards, spiders and insects. Among these animals, insects stand out for their ability to run up surfaces using tiny spines on their legs and geckos stand out for their ability to run up both rough and smooth surfaces using adhesion.FigureĀ 3.

Bottom Line: In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties.The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important.Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering , Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305 , USA.

ABSTRACT
Bioinspiration is an increasingly popular design paradigm, especially as robots venture out of the laboratory and into the world. Animals are adept at coping with the variability that the world imposes. With advances in scientific tools for understanding biological structures in detail, we are increasingly able to identify design features that account for animals' robust performance. In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties. The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important. Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

No MeSH data available.