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Climbing with adhesion: from bioinspiration to biounderstanding.

Cutkosky MR - Interface Focus (2015)

Bottom Line: In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties.The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important.Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering , Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305 , USA.

ABSTRACT
Bioinspiration is an increasingly popular design paradigm, especially as robots venture out of the laboratory and into the world. Animals are adept at coping with the variability that the world imposes. With advances in scientific tools for understanding biological structures in detail, we are increasingly able to identify design features that account for animals' robust performance. In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties. The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important. Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Microwedges, like the gecko's adhesive, present a very small area when first brought into contact with a surface. Applying a small (b) and subsequently a large (c) shear load causes them to bend over, creating a much larger contact area with adhesion. When the shear force is relaxed, they revert to the condition in (a).
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RSFS20150015F2: (a) Microwedges, like the gecko's adhesive, present a very small area when first brought into contact with a surface. Applying a small (b) and subsequently a large (c) shear load causes them to bend over, creating a much larger contact area with adhesion. When the shear force is relaxed, they revert to the condition in (a).

Mentions: The directional property of the gecko's dry adhesive has inspired some anisotropic synthetic adhesives [22–27]. In particular, one synthetic adhesive used for the Stickybot climbing robot [28], and other applications, consists of an array of ‘microwedges’ of silicone rubber (figure 2). The wedges have a sharp triangular cross section, approximately 20 µm wide at the base and 80 µm tall. The adhesive is fabricated by casting liquid silicone rubber into a mould which can be fabricated using either lithographic [26] or micromachining [29] techniques.Figure 2.


Climbing with adhesion: from bioinspiration to biounderstanding.

Cutkosky MR - Interface Focus (2015)

(a) Microwedges, like the gecko's adhesive, present a very small area when first brought into contact with a surface. Applying a small (b) and subsequently a large (c) shear load causes them to bend over, creating a much larger contact area with adhesion. When the shear force is relaxed, they revert to the condition in (a).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590421&req=5

RSFS20150015F2: (a) Microwedges, like the gecko's adhesive, present a very small area when first brought into contact with a surface. Applying a small (b) and subsequently a large (c) shear load causes them to bend over, creating a much larger contact area with adhesion. When the shear force is relaxed, they revert to the condition in (a).
Mentions: The directional property of the gecko's dry adhesive has inspired some anisotropic synthetic adhesives [22–27]. In particular, one synthetic adhesive used for the Stickybot climbing robot [28], and other applications, consists of an array of ‘microwedges’ of silicone rubber (figure 2). The wedges have a sharp triangular cross section, approximately 20 µm wide at the base and 80 µm tall. The adhesive is fabricated by casting liquid silicone rubber into a mould which can be fabricated using either lithographic [26] or micromachining [29] techniques.Figure 2.

Bottom Line: In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties.The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important.Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering , Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305 , USA.

ABSTRACT
Bioinspiration is an increasingly popular design paradigm, especially as robots venture out of the laboratory and into the world. Animals are adept at coping with the variability that the world imposes. With advances in scientific tools for understanding biological structures in detail, we are increasingly able to identify design features that account for animals' robust performance. In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties. The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important. Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus