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Evolution of cubic membranes as antioxidant defence system.

Deng Y, Almsherqi ZA - Interface Focus (2015)

Bottom Line: Our data show that cubic membrane is enriched with unique ether phospholipids, plasmalogens carrying very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.The potential interaction of cubic membrane with RNA may reduce the amount of RNA oxidation and promote more efficient protein translation.Thus, recognizing the role of cubic membranes in RNA antioxidant systems might help us to understand the adaptive mechanisms that have evolved over time in eukaryotes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences , Changzhou University, Changzhou , Jiangsu 213164 , People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Possibly the best-characterized cubic membrane transition has been observed in the mitochondrial inner membranes of free-living giant amoeba (Chaos carolinense). In this ancient organism, the cells are able to survive in extreme environments such as lack of food, thermal and osmolarity fluctuations and high levels of reactive oxygen species. Their mitochondrial inner membranes undergo rapid changes in three-dimensional organization upon food depletion, providing a valuable model to study this subcellular adaptation. Our data show that cubic membrane is enriched with unique ether phospholipids, plasmalogens carrying very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, we propose that these phospholipids may not only facilitate cubic membrane formation but may also provide a protective shelter to RNA. The potential interaction of cubic membrane with RNA may reduce the amount of RNA oxidation and promote more efficient protein translation. Thus, recognizing the role of cubic membranes in RNA antioxidant systems might help us to understand the adaptive mechanisms that have evolved over time in eukaryotes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cubic membrane architecture. (a) Three-dimensional mathematical model representing the phospholipid bilayer of cubic membrane organization. (b) Two-dimensional transmission electron micrograph of the same three-dimensional model presented in (a). (c) Scanning electron micrograph and its corresponding (d) three-dimensional and (e) two-dimensional computer simulation model of cubic membranes found in the mitochondria of 10-day starved amoeba Chaos cells. Scale bars, (b) 500 nm and (c) 100 nm.
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RSFS20150012F1: Cubic membrane architecture. (a) Three-dimensional mathematical model representing the phospholipid bilayer of cubic membrane organization. (b) Two-dimensional transmission electron micrograph of the same three-dimensional model presented in (a). (c) Scanning electron micrograph and its corresponding (d) three-dimensional and (e) two-dimensional computer simulation model of cubic membranes found in the mitochondria of 10-day starved amoeba Chaos cells. Scale bars, (b) 500 nm and (c) 100 nm.

Mentions: Biomembranes are traditionally viewed as flat sheets of phospholipid bilayers dividing the cytoplasm into multiple subcellular compartments with specialized functions. However, biomembranes may also fold up into three-dimensional periodic arrangements termed ‘cubic membranes’ (figure 1) [1,2]. Cubic membranes can be observed in virtually any membrane-bound subcellular organelles [3]. Such induced membrane transition changes are frequently accompanied by alterations in cellular oxidative stress responses, such in neoplasia, inflammation and viral infection conditions [4,5]. We have suggested on the basis of these observations that cubic membrane formation may be associated with oxidative stress [6]. In living organisms, antioxidant enzymes form the first line of defence against reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cellular environments [7]. These enzymes work in tandem to decrease the damaging effects of ROS in the cells.Figure 1.


Evolution of cubic membranes as antioxidant defence system.

Deng Y, Almsherqi ZA - Interface Focus (2015)

Cubic membrane architecture. (a) Three-dimensional mathematical model representing the phospholipid bilayer of cubic membrane organization. (b) Two-dimensional transmission electron micrograph of the same three-dimensional model presented in (a). (c) Scanning electron micrograph and its corresponding (d) three-dimensional and (e) two-dimensional computer simulation model of cubic membranes found in the mitochondria of 10-day starved amoeba Chaos cells. Scale bars, (b) 500 nm and (c) 100 nm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590420&req=5

RSFS20150012F1: Cubic membrane architecture. (a) Three-dimensional mathematical model representing the phospholipid bilayer of cubic membrane organization. (b) Two-dimensional transmission electron micrograph of the same three-dimensional model presented in (a). (c) Scanning electron micrograph and its corresponding (d) three-dimensional and (e) two-dimensional computer simulation model of cubic membranes found in the mitochondria of 10-day starved amoeba Chaos cells. Scale bars, (b) 500 nm and (c) 100 nm.
Mentions: Biomembranes are traditionally viewed as flat sheets of phospholipid bilayers dividing the cytoplasm into multiple subcellular compartments with specialized functions. However, biomembranes may also fold up into three-dimensional periodic arrangements termed ‘cubic membranes’ (figure 1) [1,2]. Cubic membranes can be observed in virtually any membrane-bound subcellular organelles [3]. Such induced membrane transition changes are frequently accompanied by alterations in cellular oxidative stress responses, such in neoplasia, inflammation and viral infection conditions [4,5]. We have suggested on the basis of these observations that cubic membrane formation may be associated with oxidative stress [6]. In living organisms, antioxidant enzymes form the first line of defence against reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cellular environments [7]. These enzymes work in tandem to decrease the damaging effects of ROS in the cells.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Our data show that cubic membrane is enriched with unique ether phospholipids, plasmalogens carrying very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.The potential interaction of cubic membrane with RNA may reduce the amount of RNA oxidation and promote more efficient protein translation.Thus, recognizing the role of cubic membranes in RNA antioxidant systems might help us to understand the adaptive mechanisms that have evolved over time in eukaryotes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences , Changzhou University, Changzhou , Jiangsu 213164 , People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Possibly the best-characterized cubic membrane transition has been observed in the mitochondrial inner membranes of free-living giant amoeba (Chaos carolinense). In this ancient organism, the cells are able to survive in extreme environments such as lack of food, thermal and osmolarity fluctuations and high levels of reactive oxygen species. Their mitochondrial inner membranes undergo rapid changes in three-dimensional organization upon food depletion, providing a valuable model to study this subcellular adaptation. Our data show that cubic membrane is enriched with unique ether phospholipids, plasmalogens carrying very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, we propose that these phospholipids may not only facilitate cubic membrane formation but may also provide a protective shelter to RNA. The potential interaction of cubic membrane with RNA may reduce the amount of RNA oxidation and promote more efficient protein translation. Thus, recognizing the role of cubic membranes in RNA antioxidant systems might help us to understand the adaptive mechanisms that have evolved over time in eukaryotes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus