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Association of smoking with restenosis and major adverse cardiac events after coronary stenting: A meta-analysis.

Hu RT, Liu J, Zhou Y, Hu BL - Pak J Med Sci (2015 Jul-Aug)

Bottom Line: Overall, smoking was not associated with ISR (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 0.79-1.41; I(2) = 47.8%).Subgroup analysis also failed to show a significant association between smoking and ISR risk regardless of bare metal stent (BMS) and drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation.Three studies investigated the association between smoking and MACCE and significant association was found (OR: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.43-3.06; I(2) = 21.6%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rui-ting Hu, MD. Minzu Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, 530001 Nanning, China.

ABSTRACT

Background and objective: The association between smoking and clinical outcomes after coronary stenting is controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the association between smoking and in stent restenosis (ISR), major adverse cardiac events (MACE), or major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) after coronary stenting.

Methods: A search for studies published before December 2014 was conducted in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library. An inverse random weighted meta-analysis was conducted using logarithm of the odds ratio (OR) and its standard error for each study.

Results: Ten studies investigated the association between smoking and ISR. Overall, smoking was not associated with ISR (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 0.79-1.41; I(2) = 47.8%). Subgroup analysis also failed to show a significant association between smoking and ISR risk regardless of bare metal stent (BMS) and drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. Eight studies explored the association between smoking and MACE, but no association was found (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.77-1.10; I(2) = 25.5%), and subgroup analysis revealed that no distinct difference was found between BMS and DES implantation. Three studies investigated the association between smoking and MACCE and significant association was found (OR: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.43-3.06; I(2) = 21.6%).

Conclusions: Our results suggest that in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, smoking is not associated with ISR and MACE; however, smoking is an independent risk factor for MACCE.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart of study selection based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria.
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Figure 1: Flow chart of study selection based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria.

Mentions: The primary literature search retrieved 108 records. After title or abstract screening and the full text evaluation, 21 studies were finally selected. Among them, 12 studies had a prospective design, 8 studies had a retrospective design, and one study was a randomized controlled trial. A flow diagram of the selection process is shown in Fig.1.


Association of smoking with restenosis and major adverse cardiac events after coronary stenting: A meta-analysis.

Hu RT, Liu J, Zhou Y, Hu BL - Pak J Med Sci (2015 Jul-Aug)

Flow chart of study selection based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590384&req=5

Figure 1: Flow chart of study selection based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria.
Mentions: The primary literature search retrieved 108 records. After title or abstract screening and the full text evaluation, 21 studies were finally selected. Among them, 12 studies had a prospective design, 8 studies had a retrospective design, and one study was a randomized controlled trial. A flow diagram of the selection process is shown in Fig.1.

Bottom Line: Overall, smoking was not associated with ISR (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 0.79-1.41; I(2) = 47.8%).Subgroup analysis also failed to show a significant association between smoking and ISR risk regardless of bare metal stent (BMS) and drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation.Three studies investigated the association between smoking and MACCE and significant association was found (OR: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.43-3.06; I(2) = 21.6%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rui-ting Hu, MD. Minzu Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, 530001 Nanning, China.

ABSTRACT

Background and objective: The association between smoking and clinical outcomes after coronary stenting is controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the association between smoking and in stent restenosis (ISR), major adverse cardiac events (MACE), or major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) after coronary stenting.

Methods: A search for studies published before December 2014 was conducted in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library. An inverse random weighted meta-analysis was conducted using logarithm of the odds ratio (OR) and its standard error for each study.

Results: Ten studies investigated the association between smoking and ISR. Overall, smoking was not associated with ISR (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 0.79-1.41; I(2) = 47.8%). Subgroup analysis also failed to show a significant association between smoking and ISR risk regardless of bare metal stent (BMS) and drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. Eight studies explored the association between smoking and MACE, but no association was found (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.77-1.10; I(2) = 25.5%), and subgroup analysis revealed that no distinct difference was found between BMS and DES implantation. Three studies investigated the association between smoking and MACCE and significant association was found (OR: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.43-3.06; I(2) = 21.6%).

Conclusions: Our results suggest that in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, smoking is not associated with ISR and MACE; however, smoking is an independent risk factor for MACCE.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus