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Effects of a helium/oxygen mixture on individuals' lung function and metabolic cost during submaximal exercise for participants with obstructive lung diseases.

Häussermann S, Schulze A, Katz IM, Martin AR, Herpich C, Hunger T, Texereau J - Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: For asthmatics, but not for the COPD participants, there was a statistically significant benefit in reduced metabolic cost, determined through measurement of oxygen uptake, for the same exercise work rate.However, the individual data show that there were a mixture of responders and nonresponders to helium/oxygen in all of the groups.The inconsistent response to helium/oxygen between individuals is perhaps the key drawback to the more effective and widespread use of helium/oxygen to increase exercise capacity and for other therapeutic applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Inamed GmbH, Gauting, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Helium/oxygen therapies have been studied as a means to reduce the symptoms of obstructive lung diseases with inconclusive results in clinical trials. To better understand this variability in results, an exploratory physiological study was performed comparing the effects of helium/oxygen mixture (78%/22%) to that of medical air.

Methods: The gas mixtures were administered to healthy, asthmatic, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) participants, both moderate and severe (6 participants in each disease group, a total of 30); at rest and during submaximal cycling exercise with equivalent work rates. Measurements of ventilatory parameters, forced spirometry, and ergospirometry were obtained.

Results: There was no statistical difference in ventilatory and cardiac responses to breathing helium/oxygen during submaximal exercise. For asthmatics, but not for the COPD participants, there was a statistically significant benefit in reduced metabolic cost, determined through measurement of oxygen uptake, for the same exercise work rate. However, the individual data show that there were a mixture of responders and nonresponders to helium/oxygen in all of the groups.

Conclusion: The inconsistent response to helium/oxygen between individuals is perhaps the key drawback to the more effective and widespread use of helium/oxygen to increase exercise capacity and for other therapeutic applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Individual changes in MET after submaximal exercise while breathing air or He/O2 for the (A) healthy, (B) asthmatic, and (C) COPD groups.Notes: MET is based on  measure for each subject at rest. For the subject groups, solid and dashed lines are for moderate and severe cases, respectively. The bars represent the mean values. There were only 30 participants in total who completed the study, but subject numbers were assigned to other initiated patients who later dropped out while the original subject numbers are retained.Abbreviations: MET, metabolic equivalent; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; V′O2, oxygen uptake.
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f5-copd-10-1987: Individual changes in MET after submaximal exercise while breathing air or He/O2 for the (A) healthy, (B) asthmatic, and (C) COPD groups.Notes: MET is based on measure for each subject at rest. For the subject groups, solid and dashed lines are for moderate and severe cases, respectively. The bars represent the mean values. There were only 30 participants in total who completed the study, but subject numbers were assigned to other initiated patients who later dropped out while the original subject numbers are retained.Abbreviations: MET, metabolic equivalent; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; V′O2, oxygen uptake.

Mentions: Plots showing the change in nV′O2 and MET while inhaling each gas mixture at rest and at submaximal exercise for each subject are shown in Figures 4 and 5, respectively. Plots showing the change of during exercise for each subject are shown in Figure 6.


Effects of a helium/oxygen mixture on individuals' lung function and metabolic cost during submaximal exercise for participants with obstructive lung diseases.

Häussermann S, Schulze A, Katz IM, Martin AR, Herpich C, Hunger T, Texereau J - Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis (2015)

Individual changes in MET after submaximal exercise while breathing air or He/O2 for the (A) healthy, (B) asthmatic, and (C) COPD groups.Notes: MET is based on  measure for each subject at rest. For the subject groups, solid and dashed lines are for moderate and severe cases, respectively. The bars represent the mean values. There were only 30 participants in total who completed the study, but subject numbers were assigned to other initiated patients who later dropped out while the original subject numbers are retained.Abbreviations: MET, metabolic equivalent; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; V′O2, oxygen uptake.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590345&req=5

f5-copd-10-1987: Individual changes in MET after submaximal exercise while breathing air or He/O2 for the (A) healthy, (B) asthmatic, and (C) COPD groups.Notes: MET is based on measure for each subject at rest. For the subject groups, solid and dashed lines are for moderate and severe cases, respectively. The bars represent the mean values. There were only 30 participants in total who completed the study, but subject numbers were assigned to other initiated patients who later dropped out while the original subject numbers are retained.Abbreviations: MET, metabolic equivalent; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; V′O2, oxygen uptake.
Mentions: Plots showing the change in nV′O2 and MET while inhaling each gas mixture at rest and at submaximal exercise for each subject are shown in Figures 4 and 5, respectively. Plots showing the change of during exercise for each subject are shown in Figure 6.

Bottom Line: For asthmatics, but not for the COPD participants, there was a statistically significant benefit in reduced metabolic cost, determined through measurement of oxygen uptake, for the same exercise work rate.However, the individual data show that there were a mixture of responders and nonresponders to helium/oxygen in all of the groups.The inconsistent response to helium/oxygen between individuals is perhaps the key drawback to the more effective and widespread use of helium/oxygen to increase exercise capacity and for other therapeutic applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Inamed GmbH, Gauting, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Helium/oxygen therapies have been studied as a means to reduce the symptoms of obstructive lung diseases with inconclusive results in clinical trials. To better understand this variability in results, an exploratory physiological study was performed comparing the effects of helium/oxygen mixture (78%/22%) to that of medical air.

Methods: The gas mixtures were administered to healthy, asthmatic, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) participants, both moderate and severe (6 participants in each disease group, a total of 30); at rest and during submaximal cycling exercise with equivalent work rates. Measurements of ventilatory parameters, forced spirometry, and ergospirometry were obtained.

Results: There was no statistical difference in ventilatory and cardiac responses to breathing helium/oxygen during submaximal exercise. For asthmatics, but not for the COPD participants, there was a statistically significant benefit in reduced metabolic cost, determined through measurement of oxygen uptake, for the same exercise work rate. However, the individual data show that there were a mixture of responders and nonresponders to helium/oxygen in all of the groups.

Conclusion: The inconsistent response to helium/oxygen between individuals is perhaps the key drawback to the more effective and widespread use of helium/oxygen to increase exercise capacity and for other therapeutic applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus