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Temperatures of storage areas in large animal veterinary practice vehicles in the summer and comparison with drug manufacturers' storage recommendations.

Ondrak JD, Jones ML, Fajt VR - BMC Vet. Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: In Nebraska, at least one temperature over 25 °C was recorded on a mean of 111/124 days and a mean of 63 % of total logger readings.In Texas, temperatures over 25 °C were recorded on a mean of 123/124 days and a mean of 95 % of total logger readings.More research is needed to determine whether these excursions above the manufacturers' recommended storage temperatures alter efficacy of stored drugs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Clay Center, NE, USA. jondrak@gpvec.unl.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Large animal veterinarians carry drugs in their practice vehicles in storage areas that are not typically refrigerated. The most common upper limits of manufacturers' storage temperatures for United States (U.S.)-approved non-refrigerated drugs are 25 or 30 °C. Because ambient temperatures in many locations in the U.S. exceed these temperatures during the summer, we measured storage area temperatures over 4 months in the summer of 2013 to evaluate the extent to which labeled storage temperatures are exceeded.

Methods: A convenience sample of 12 vehicles from 5 central Texas practices and 12 vehicles from 4 south central Nebraska practices was used. Temperatures were recorded in one drug storage compartment in each vehicle from May 15 - September 16, 2013, at 15-minute intervals using a self-contained, battery operated temperature recording device.

Results: The highest temperatures recorded in a storage unit were 54.4 and 47.7 °C in Texas and Nebraska, respectively. The mean temperature recorded across all 24 storage units was 29.1 °C, with a mean of 26.9 °C in Nebraska and 31.4 °C in Texas. In Nebraska, at least one temperature over 25 °C was recorded on a mean of 111/124 days and a mean of 63 % of total logger readings. In Texas, temperatures over 25 °C were recorded on a mean of 123/124 days and a mean of 95 % of total logger readings.

Conclusions: Temperatures in storage units in participating veterinary practice vehicles exceeded labeled drug storage temperatures a significant portion of the summer of 2013. More research is needed to determine whether these excursions above the manufacturers' recommended storage temperatures alter efficacy of stored drugs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequency of readings exceeding the reference temperatures at each recording time point.  = Nebraska loggers with readings >25 °C;  = Nebraska loggers with readings >30 °C;  = Texas loggers with readings >25 °C;  = Texas loggers with readings >30 °C
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Fig1: Frequency of readings exceeding the reference temperatures at each recording time point. = Nebraska loggers with readings >25 °C; = Nebraska loggers with readings >30 °C; = Texas loggers with readings >25 °C; = Texas loggers with readings >30 °C

Mentions: Figure 1 demonstrates the times of day during which vehicle temperatures exceeded either of the two common recommended drug storage temperatures. The lowest number of excursions above 25 and 30 °C for Texas loggers were 1242/1488 at 8:00 AM and 295/1488 at 9:00 AM, respectively (Fig. 1). The highest number of excursions above 25 and 30 °C for Texas loggers were 1481/1488 from 6:45 to 8:30 PM and 1344/1488 from 6:30 to 6:45 PM, respectively. The lowest number of excursions above 25 and 30 °C for Nebraska loggers were 540/1488 and 120/1488, respectively, and occurred at 8:45 AM and 9:15 AM. The highest number of excursions above 25 and 30 °C for Nebraska loggers were 1265/1488 at 6:15 PM and 795/1488 at 6:30 PM.Fig. 1


Temperatures of storage areas in large animal veterinary practice vehicles in the summer and comparison with drug manufacturers' storage recommendations.

Ondrak JD, Jones ML, Fajt VR - BMC Vet. Res. (2015)

Frequency of readings exceeding the reference temperatures at each recording time point.  = Nebraska loggers with readings >25 °C;  = Nebraska loggers with readings >30 °C;  = Texas loggers with readings >25 °C;  = Texas loggers with readings >30 °C
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590276&req=5

Fig1: Frequency of readings exceeding the reference temperatures at each recording time point. = Nebraska loggers with readings >25 °C; = Nebraska loggers with readings >30 °C; = Texas loggers with readings >25 °C; = Texas loggers with readings >30 °C
Mentions: Figure 1 demonstrates the times of day during which vehicle temperatures exceeded either of the two common recommended drug storage temperatures. The lowest number of excursions above 25 and 30 °C for Texas loggers were 1242/1488 at 8:00 AM and 295/1488 at 9:00 AM, respectively (Fig. 1). The highest number of excursions above 25 and 30 °C for Texas loggers were 1481/1488 from 6:45 to 8:30 PM and 1344/1488 from 6:30 to 6:45 PM, respectively. The lowest number of excursions above 25 and 30 °C for Nebraska loggers were 540/1488 and 120/1488, respectively, and occurred at 8:45 AM and 9:15 AM. The highest number of excursions above 25 and 30 °C for Nebraska loggers were 1265/1488 at 6:15 PM and 795/1488 at 6:30 PM.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: In Nebraska, at least one temperature over 25 °C was recorded on a mean of 111/124 days and a mean of 63 % of total logger readings.In Texas, temperatures over 25 °C were recorded on a mean of 123/124 days and a mean of 95 % of total logger readings.More research is needed to determine whether these excursions above the manufacturers' recommended storage temperatures alter efficacy of stored drugs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Clay Center, NE, USA. jondrak@gpvec.unl.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Large animal veterinarians carry drugs in their practice vehicles in storage areas that are not typically refrigerated. The most common upper limits of manufacturers' storage temperatures for United States (U.S.)-approved non-refrigerated drugs are 25 or 30 °C. Because ambient temperatures in many locations in the U.S. exceed these temperatures during the summer, we measured storage area temperatures over 4 months in the summer of 2013 to evaluate the extent to which labeled storage temperatures are exceeded.

Methods: A convenience sample of 12 vehicles from 5 central Texas practices and 12 vehicles from 4 south central Nebraska practices was used. Temperatures were recorded in one drug storage compartment in each vehicle from May 15 - September 16, 2013, at 15-minute intervals using a self-contained, battery operated temperature recording device.

Results: The highest temperatures recorded in a storage unit were 54.4 and 47.7 °C in Texas and Nebraska, respectively. The mean temperature recorded across all 24 storage units was 29.1 °C, with a mean of 26.9 °C in Nebraska and 31.4 °C in Texas. In Nebraska, at least one temperature over 25 °C was recorded on a mean of 111/124 days and a mean of 63 % of total logger readings. In Texas, temperatures over 25 °C were recorded on a mean of 123/124 days and a mean of 95 % of total logger readings.

Conclusions: Temperatures in storage units in participating veterinary practice vehicles exceeded labeled drug storage temperatures a significant portion of the summer of 2013. More research is needed to determine whether these excursions above the manufacturers' recommended storage temperatures alter efficacy of stored drugs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus