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Nanotechnology and bio-functionalisation for peripheral nerve regeneration.

Sedaghati T, Seifalian AM - Neural Regen Res (2015)

Bottom Line: There is a high clinical demand for new smart biomaterials, which stimulate neuronal cell proliferation, migration and increase cell-material interaction to facilitate nerve regeneration across these critical-sized defects.This article briefly reviews several up-to-date published studies using Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid peptide sequence, nanocomposite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanoparticle and nanofibrous scaffolds as promising strategies to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration by influencing cellular behaviour such as attachment, spreading and proliferation.The aim is to establish the potent manipulations, which are simple and easy to employ in the clinical conditions for nerve regeneration and repair.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine, Division of Surgery & Interventional Science, University College London, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
There is a high clinical demand for new smart biomaterials, which stimulate neuronal cell proliferation, migration and increase cell-material interaction to facilitate nerve regeneration across these critical-sized defects. This article briefly reviews several up-to-date published studies using Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid peptide sequence, nanocomposite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanoparticle and nanofibrous scaffolds as promising strategies to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration by influencing cellular behaviour such as attachment, spreading and proliferation. The aim is to establish the potent manipulations, which are simple and easy to employ in the clinical conditions for nerve regeneration and repair.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic diagram of cell attachment and spreading on un-coated (A) and Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid (RGD)-coated (B) surfaces (adapted from Sedaghati et al., 2014).The interaction between cellular integrin receptor and RGD sequence on the surface of a biomaterial is important in controlling the intracellular signalling pathway.
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Figure 1: Schematic diagram of cell attachment and spreading on un-coated (A) and Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid (RGD)-coated (B) surfaces (adapted from Sedaghati et al., 2014).The interaction between cellular integrin receptor and RGD sequence on the surface of a biomaterial is important in controlling the intracellular signalling pathway.

Mentions: Among the ECM adhesion receptors, integrins play key roles in tissue regeneration. They not only have effect on the cell adhesion but also on transducing growth related signals by influencing intracellular signalling, particularly through the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) pathway (Juliano et al., 2004; Tucker and Mearow, 2008). It has been revealed that SCs up-regulate expression of integrins on contact with dorsal root ganglion neurons (Einheber et al., 1993). Several isolated and purified forms of ECM peptide sequences, like RGD, have been used experimentally to enhance neural regeneration (Rogers et al., 1983; Santiago et al., 2006; Webber and Zochodne, 2010). Many adhesive proteins present in ECM, such as fibronectin, vitronectin, collagen and laminin, contain RGD cell adhesion sequence in their integrin recognition sites, which is cell surface receptor that recognizes the RGD sequence of various proteins. When this sequence is recognised by its integrin, it provides signals for cell attachment, growth, maturation and differentiation (Hersel et al., 2003). Figure 1 shows schematic diagram of cell surface integrin interaction with RGD coated surface. Extensive research over the last decade has revealed that the ECM derived RGD sequence, can act as an integral cell adhesion recognition sequence which interacts with a variety of integrins and promote cell attachment, neurite outgrowth and differentiation (Ruoslahti, 1996; Plow et al., 2000; Rashid et al., 2004). As a result of these molecular changes, SCs proliferate and develop a scaffold ahead of the re-growing axon fibers which encourage nerve regeneration (Webber and Zochodne, 2010). Incorporation of a small amount of RGD peptide, for instance 1 fmol/cm2, has shown effectively improved cell adhesion to the non-adherent surface (Rafiuddin Ahmed and Jayakumar, 2003). RGD peptide facilitates SC outgrowth at low doses but will disrupt endogenous fibronectin signalling and regeneration at higher doses (Liu et al., 2009). Addition of RGD has shown to affect the physiochemical properties of neural scaffold's surface. Surface topography and chemistry of biomaterial have been shown to be extremely important in determining cell-material interactions by influencing cellular properties such as cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, cell-cell reactions and cytoskeleton organisation (Jell et al., 2009).


Nanotechnology and bio-functionalisation for peripheral nerve regeneration.

Sedaghati T, Seifalian AM - Neural Regen Res (2015)

Schematic diagram of cell attachment and spreading on un-coated (A) and Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid (RGD)-coated (B) surfaces (adapted from Sedaghati et al., 2014).The interaction between cellular integrin receptor and RGD sequence on the surface of a biomaterial is important in controlling the intracellular signalling pathway.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590217&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic diagram of cell attachment and spreading on un-coated (A) and Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid (RGD)-coated (B) surfaces (adapted from Sedaghati et al., 2014).The interaction between cellular integrin receptor and RGD sequence on the surface of a biomaterial is important in controlling the intracellular signalling pathway.
Mentions: Among the ECM adhesion receptors, integrins play key roles in tissue regeneration. They not only have effect on the cell adhesion but also on transducing growth related signals by influencing intracellular signalling, particularly through the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) pathway (Juliano et al., 2004; Tucker and Mearow, 2008). It has been revealed that SCs up-regulate expression of integrins on contact with dorsal root ganglion neurons (Einheber et al., 1993). Several isolated and purified forms of ECM peptide sequences, like RGD, have been used experimentally to enhance neural regeneration (Rogers et al., 1983; Santiago et al., 2006; Webber and Zochodne, 2010). Many adhesive proteins present in ECM, such as fibronectin, vitronectin, collagen and laminin, contain RGD cell adhesion sequence in their integrin recognition sites, which is cell surface receptor that recognizes the RGD sequence of various proteins. When this sequence is recognised by its integrin, it provides signals for cell attachment, growth, maturation and differentiation (Hersel et al., 2003). Figure 1 shows schematic diagram of cell surface integrin interaction with RGD coated surface. Extensive research over the last decade has revealed that the ECM derived RGD sequence, can act as an integral cell adhesion recognition sequence which interacts with a variety of integrins and promote cell attachment, neurite outgrowth and differentiation (Ruoslahti, 1996; Plow et al., 2000; Rashid et al., 2004). As a result of these molecular changes, SCs proliferate and develop a scaffold ahead of the re-growing axon fibers which encourage nerve regeneration (Webber and Zochodne, 2010). Incorporation of a small amount of RGD peptide, for instance 1 fmol/cm2, has shown effectively improved cell adhesion to the non-adherent surface (Rafiuddin Ahmed and Jayakumar, 2003). RGD peptide facilitates SC outgrowth at low doses but will disrupt endogenous fibronectin signalling and regeneration at higher doses (Liu et al., 2009). Addition of RGD has shown to affect the physiochemical properties of neural scaffold's surface. Surface topography and chemistry of biomaterial have been shown to be extremely important in determining cell-material interactions by influencing cellular properties such as cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, cell-cell reactions and cytoskeleton organisation (Jell et al., 2009).

Bottom Line: There is a high clinical demand for new smart biomaterials, which stimulate neuronal cell proliferation, migration and increase cell-material interaction to facilitate nerve regeneration across these critical-sized defects.This article briefly reviews several up-to-date published studies using Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid peptide sequence, nanocomposite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanoparticle and nanofibrous scaffolds as promising strategies to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration by influencing cellular behaviour such as attachment, spreading and proliferation.The aim is to establish the potent manipulations, which are simple and easy to employ in the clinical conditions for nerve regeneration and repair.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine, Division of Surgery & Interventional Science, University College London, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
There is a high clinical demand for new smart biomaterials, which stimulate neuronal cell proliferation, migration and increase cell-material interaction to facilitate nerve regeneration across these critical-sized defects. This article briefly reviews several up-to-date published studies using Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid peptide sequence, nanocomposite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanoparticle and nanofibrous scaffolds as promising strategies to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration by influencing cellular behaviour such as attachment, spreading and proliferation. The aim is to establish the potent manipulations, which are simple and easy to employ in the clinical conditions for nerve regeneration and repair.

No MeSH data available.