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Symbiosis dependent accumulation of primary metabolites in arbuscule-containing cells.

Gaude N, Bortfeld S, Erban A, Kopka J, Krajinski F - BMC Plant Biol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Here we describe the analysis of metabolite pools in arbuscule-containing cells, which are the site of nutrient transfer between AM fungus and host plant.High levels of the amino acids, aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine, were observed in arbuscule-containing cells.Elevated amounts of sucrose and the steady-state of hexose levels indicated a direct assimilation of monosaccharides by the fungal partner.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476, Potsdam, Germany. Gaude@mpimp-golm.mpg.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is characterized by the presence of different symbiotic structures and stages within a root system. Therefore tools allowing the analysis of molecular changes at a cellular level are required to reveal insight into arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis development and functioning.

Results: Here we describe the analysis of metabolite pools in arbuscule-containing cells, which are the site of nutrient transfer between AM fungus and host plant. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) combined with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-EI/TOF-MS) enabled the analysis of primary metabolite levels,which might be of plant or fungal origin, within these cells.

Conclusions: High levels of the amino acids, aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine, were observed in arbuscule-containing cells. Elevated amounts of sucrose and the steady-state of hexose levels indicated a direct assimilation of monosaccharides by the fungal partner.

No MeSH data available.


Polar primary metabolites which accumulate at least 2-fold in arbuscule containing cells of mycorrhizal roots (myc+) compared to cortex cells of non-mycorrhizal roots (myc-) of Medicago truncatula. Proteinogenic amino acids (black bars), polyols (grey bars) and disaccharides (light grey bars) are highlighted (cf., Additional file 2: Table S1). Yet non-identified metabolites are named by an identifier code of the GolmMetabolome Database (http://gmd.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/)
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Fig2: Polar primary metabolites which accumulate at least 2-fold in arbuscule containing cells of mycorrhizal roots (myc+) compared to cortex cells of non-mycorrhizal roots (myc-) of Medicago truncatula. Proteinogenic amino acids (black bars), polyols (grey bars) and disaccharides (light grey bars) are highlighted (cf., Additional file 2: Table S1). Yet non-identified metabolites are named by an identifier code of the GolmMetabolome Database (http://gmd.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/)

Mentions: In total, 13,638 arbuscule containing cells (arb) and 12,560 cortical cells (cor) were isolated and subjected to GC-EI/TOF-MS analysis. GC-MS measurements revealed a clear difference in the metabolite composition between both cell types (Fig. 2). This indicated that GC-EI/TOF-MS-mediated analysis of primary metabolites is feasible in LMD-isolated cells and the applied method is sensitive enough to analyse limited root material.Fig. 2


Symbiosis dependent accumulation of primary metabolites in arbuscule-containing cells.

Gaude N, Bortfeld S, Erban A, Kopka J, Krajinski F - BMC Plant Biol. (2015)

Polar primary metabolites which accumulate at least 2-fold in arbuscule containing cells of mycorrhizal roots (myc+) compared to cortex cells of non-mycorrhizal roots (myc-) of Medicago truncatula. Proteinogenic amino acids (black bars), polyols (grey bars) and disaccharides (light grey bars) are highlighted (cf., Additional file 2: Table S1). Yet non-identified metabolites are named by an identifier code of the GolmMetabolome Database (http://gmd.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590214&req=5

Fig2: Polar primary metabolites which accumulate at least 2-fold in arbuscule containing cells of mycorrhizal roots (myc+) compared to cortex cells of non-mycorrhizal roots (myc-) of Medicago truncatula. Proteinogenic amino acids (black bars), polyols (grey bars) and disaccharides (light grey bars) are highlighted (cf., Additional file 2: Table S1). Yet non-identified metabolites are named by an identifier code of the GolmMetabolome Database (http://gmd.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/)
Mentions: In total, 13,638 arbuscule containing cells (arb) and 12,560 cortical cells (cor) were isolated and subjected to GC-EI/TOF-MS analysis. GC-MS measurements revealed a clear difference in the metabolite composition between both cell types (Fig. 2). This indicated that GC-EI/TOF-MS-mediated analysis of primary metabolites is feasible in LMD-isolated cells and the applied method is sensitive enough to analyse limited root material.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Here we describe the analysis of metabolite pools in arbuscule-containing cells, which are the site of nutrient transfer between AM fungus and host plant.High levels of the amino acids, aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine, were observed in arbuscule-containing cells.Elevated amounts of sucrose and the steady-state of hexose levels indicated a direct assimilation of monosaccharides by the fungal partner.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476, Potsdam, Germany. Gaude@mpimp-golm.mpg.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is characterized by the presence of different symbiotic structures and stages within a root system. Therefore tools allowing the analysis of molecular changes at a cellular level are required to reveal insight into arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis development and functioning.

Results: Here we describe the analysis of metabolite pools in arbuscule-containing cells, which are the site of nutrient transfer between AM fungus and host plant. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) combined with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-EI/TOF-MS) enabled the analysis of primary metabolite levels,which might be of plant or fungal origin, within these cells.

Conclusions: High levels of the amino acids, aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine, were observed in arbuscule-containing cells. Elevated amounts of sucrose and the steady-state of hexose levels indicated a direct assimilation of monosaccharides by the fungal partner.

No MeSH data available.