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Molecular detection of vector-borne agents in dogs from ten provinces of China.

Xu D, Zhang J, Shi Z, Song C, Zheng X, Zhang Y, Hao Y, Dong H, Wei L, El-Mahallawy HS, Kelly P, Xiong W, Wang H, Li J, Zhang X, Gu J, Wang C - Parasit Vectors (2015)

Bottom Line: The qPCRs for Anaplasma spp., Dirofilaria immitis and Leishmania spp. were negative for all blood samples, ticks and lice.At least one vector-borne agent was found in dogs from 5 of the 10 provinces investigated in this study.Our study confirms that B. vogeli, B. gibsoni, H. canis, and E. canis occur in China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou University College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009, P. R. China. xuda910502@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although many vector-borne agents are potential zoonoses and cause substantial morbidity and mortality in dogs worldwide, there are limited data on these organisms in dogs of China.

Methods: Quantitative PCRs for vector-borne agents were performed to investigate their prevalences in convenience whole blood samples obtained from 1114 dogs from 21 veterinary clinics and a commercial dog breeding facility in ten provinces of China. In addition, the PCRs were performed on 146 Rhipicephalus sanguineus senso lato and 37 Linognathus setosus collected from dogs in the commercial dog breeding facility.

Results: DNAs of Babesia gibsoni and B. vogeli (1.2 %), Ehrlichia canis (1.3 %), Hepatozoon canis (1.8 %) and Theileria orientalis (0.1 %) or a closely related organism were detected in the bloods of the dogs studied, and Babesia vogeli (3.4 %) and Ehrlichia canis (4.1 %) in R. sanguineus senso lato. The qPCRs for Anaplasma spp., Dirofilaria immitis and Leishmania spp. were negative for all blood samples, ticks and lice. At least one vector-borne agent was found in dogs from 5 of the 10 provinces investigated in this study. Overall, 4.4 % (49/1117) of the dogs studied were positive for at least one vector-borne agent with the prevalence being highest in the commercial breeding colony (24/97; 24.7 %).

Conclusions: Our study confirms that B. vogeli, B. gibsoni, H. canis, and E. canis occur in China. Also, we present evidence that T. orientalis or a closely related organism can infect dogs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalences of 4 vector-borne agents in 10 provinces of China. Dog blood samples (1114) were collected from ten provinces (in bisque) of China. The prevalences are shown for Babesia vogeli (red), B. gibsoni (black), Hepatozoon canis (green) and Ehrlichia canis (blue) in different colors
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Fig1: Prevalences of 4 vector-borne agents in 10 provinces of China. Dog blood samples (1114) were collected from ten provinces (in bisque) of China. The prevalences are shown for Babesia vogeli (red), B. gibsoni (black), Hepatozoon canis (green) and Ehrlichia canis (blue) in different colors

Mentions: Between November 2012 and February 2014, convenience whole blood samples were collected in EDTA by veterinarians who volunteered to participate (Table 1, Fig. 1). The dogs sampled in Taixing, Jiangsu province, were apparently healthy animals in a commercial dog breeding facility: convenience samples of ticks and lice were also collected from these dogs. The remaining dogs in the study were those attending 21 local veterinary clinics for routine health checks, vaccinations and for various conditions. Veterinarians were asked to comment on the presence or absence of ectoparasites on the dogs sampled.Table 1


Molecular detection of vector-borne agents in dogs from ten provinces of China.

Xu D, Zhang J, Shi Z, Song C, Zheng X, Zhang Y, Hao Y, Dong H, Wei L, El-Mahallawy HS, Kelly P, Xiong W, Wang H, Li J, Zhang X, Gu J, Wang C - Parasit Vectors (2015)

Prevalences of 4 vector-borne agents in 10 provinces of China. Dog blood samples (1114) were collected from ten provinces (in bisque) of China. The prevalences are shown for Babesia vogeli (red), B. gibsoni (black), Hepatozoon canis (green) and Ehrlichia canis (blue) in different colors
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589947&req=5

Fig1: Prevalences of 4 vector-borne agents in 10 provinces of China. Dog blood samples (1114) were collected from ten provinces (in bisque) of China. The prevalences are shown for Babesia vogeli (red), B. gibsoni (black), Hepatozoon canis (green) and Ehrlichia canis (blue) in different colors
Mentions: Between November 2012 and February 2014, convenience whole blood samples were collected in EDTA by veterinarians who volunteered to participate (Table 1, Fig. 1). The dogs sampled in Taixing, Jiangsu province, were apparently healthy animals in a commercial dog breeding facility: convenience samples of ticks and lice were also collected from these dogs. The remaining dogs in the study were those attending 21 local veterinary clinics for routine health checks, vaccinations and for various conditions. Veterinarians were asked to comment on the presence or absence of ectoparasites on the dogs sampled.Table 1

Bottom Line: The qPCRs for Anaplasma spp., Dirofilaria immitis and Leishmania spp. were negative for all blood samples, ticks and lice.At least one vector-borne agent was found in dogs from 5 of the 10 provinces investigated in this study.Our study confirms that B. vogeli, B. gibsoni, H. canis, and E. canis occur in China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou University College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009, P. R. China. xuda910502@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although many vector-borne agents are potential zoonoses and cause substantial morbidity and mortality in dogs worldwide, there are limited data on these organisms in dogs of China.

Methods: Quantitative PCRs for vector-borne agents were performed to investigate their prevalences in convenience whole blood samples obtained from 1114 dogs from 21 veterinary clinics and a commercial dog breeding facility in ten provinces of China. In addition, the PCRs were performed on 146 Rhipicephalus sanguineus senso lato and 37 Linognathus setosus collected from dogs in the commercial dog breeding facility.

Results: DNAs of Babesia gibsoni and B. vogeli (1.2 %), Ehrlichia canis (1.3 %), Hepatozoon canis (1.8 %) and Theileria orientalis (0.1 %) or a closely related organism were detected in the bloods of the dogs studied, and Babesia vogeli (3.4 %) and Ehrlichia canis (4.1 %) in R. sanguineus senso lato. The qPCRs for Anaplasma spp., Dirofilaria immitis and Leishmania spp. were negative for all blood samples, ticks and lice. At least one vector-borne agent was found in dogs from 5 of the 10 provinces investigated in this study. Overall, 4.4 % (49/1117) of the dogs studied were positive for at least one vector-borne agent with the prevalence being highest in the commercial breeding colony (24/97; 24.7 %).

Conclusions: Our study confirms that B. vogeli, B. gibsoni, H. canis, and E. canis occur in China. Also, we present evidence that T. orientalis or a closely related organism can infect dogs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus