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Mass spectrometric identification and toxicity assessment of degraded products of aflatoxin B1 and B2 by Corymbia citriodora aqueous extracts.

Iram W, Anjum T, Iqbal M, Ghaffar A, Abbas M - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Results indicated that C. citriodora leaf extract(s) more effectively degrade AFB1 and AFB2 i.e. 95.21% and 92.95% respectively than C. citriodora branch extract, under optimized conditions.Toxicity of these degraded products was significantly reduced as compared to that of parent compounds because of the removal of double bond in the terminal furan ring.The biological toxicity of degraded toxin was further analyzed by brine shrimps bioassay, which showed that only 17.5% mortality in larvae was recorded as compared to untreated toxin where 92.5% mortality was observed after 96hr of incubation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Agricultural Sciences, University of the Punjab, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT
This study explores the detoxification potential of Corymbia citriodora plant extracts against aflatoxin B1 and B2 (AFB1; 100 μg L(-1) and AFB2; 50 μg L(-1)) in In vitro and In vivo assays. Detoxification was qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by TLC and HPLC, respectively. The study was carried out by using different parameters of optimal temperature, pH and incubation time period. Results indicated that C. citriodora leaf extract(s) more effectively degrade AFB1 and AFB2 i.e. 95.21% and 92.95% respectively than C. citriodora branch extract, under optimized conditions. The structural elucidation of degraded toxin products was done by LCMS/MS analysis. Ten degraded products of AFB1 and AFB2 and their fragmentation pathways were proposed based on molecular formulas and MS/MS spectra. Toxicity of these degraded products was significantly reduced as compared to that of parent compounds because of the removal of double bond in the terminal furan ring. The biological toxicity of degraded toxin was further analyzed by brine shrimps bioassay, which showed that only 17.5% mortality in larvae was recorded as compared to untreated toxin where 92.5% mortality was observed after 96hr of incubation. Therefore, our finding suggests that C. citriodora leaf extract can be used as an effective tool for the detoxification of aflatoxins.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MS/MS Spectra and fragmentation pathway of degraded product with 311.17 m/z.
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f3: MS/MS Spectra and fragmentation pathway of degraded product with 311.17 m/z.

Mentions: The degradation product C17H10O6 (with 311.17 m/z) formed by the loss of two hydrogen atoms from AFB1. The DBE of C17H10O6 was 13 which was one more than AFB1. The fragmentation pathway was different from that of AFB1. The precursor ion yielded a series of product ions which are represented by 293.17 [M-H2O]+, 267.17 [M-CO2]+, 253.17 [M-C2H2O2]+, 279.17 [M-CH4O]+, 251.08 [M-C2H4O2]+, 223.08 [M-C3H4O3]+ and 209.08 [M-C3H2O4]+ (Fig. 3).


Mass spectrometric identification and toxicity assessment of degraded products of aflatoxin B1 and B2 by Corymbia citriodora aqueous extracts.

Iram W, Anjum T, Iqbal M, Ghaffar A, Abbas M - Sci Rep (2015)

MS/MS Spectra and fragmentation pathway of degraded product with 311.17 m/z.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589780&req=5

f3: MS/MS Spectra and fragmentation pathway of degraded product with 311.17 m/z.
Mentions: The degradation product C17H10O6 (with 311.17 m/z) formed by the loss of two hydrogen atoms from AFB1. The DBE of C17H10O6 was 13 which was one more than AFB1. The fragmentation pathway was different from that of AFB1. The precursor ion yielded a series of product ions which are represented by 293.17 [M-H2O]+, 267.17 [M-CO2]+, 253.17 [M-C2H2O2]+, 279.17 [M-CH4O]+, 251.08 [M-C2H4O2]+, 223.08 [M-C3H4O3]+ and 209.08 [M-C3H2O4]+ (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Results indicated that C. citriodora leaf extract(s) more effectively degrade AFB1 and AFB2 i.e. 95.21% and 92.95% respectively than C. citriodora branch extract, under optimized conditions.Toxicity of these degraded products was significantly reduced as compared to that of parent compounds because of the removal of double bond in the terminal furan ring.The biological toxicity of degraded toxin was further analyzed by brine shrimps bioassay, which showed that only 17.5% mortality in larvae was recorded as compared to untreated toxin where 92.5% mortality was observed after 96hr of incubation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Agricultural Sciences, University of the Punjab, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT
This study explores the detoxification potential of Corymbia citriodora plant extracts against aflatoxin B1 and B2 (AFB1; 100 μg L(-1) and AFB2; 50 μg L(-1)) in In vitro and In vivo assays. Detoxification was qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by TLC and HPLC, respectively. The study was carried out by using different parameters of optimal temperature, pH and incubation time period. Results indicated that C. citriodora leaf extract(s) more effectively degrade AFB1 and AFB2 i.e. 95.21% and 92.95% respectively than C. citriodora branch extract, under optimized conditions. The structural elucidation of degraded toxin products was done by LCMS/MS analysis. Ten degraded products of AFB1 and AFB2 and their fragmentation pathways were proposed based on molecular formulas and MS/MS spectra. Toxicity of these degraded products was significantly reduced as compared to that of parent compounds because of the removal of double bond in the terminal furan ring. The biological toxicity of degraded toxin was further analyzed by brine shrimps bioassay, which showed that only 17.5% mortality in larvae was recorded as compared to untreated toxin where 92.5% mortality was observed after 96hr of incubation. Therefore, our finding suggests that C. citriodora leaf extract can be used as an effective tool for the detoxification of aflatoxins.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus