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Genomics for greater efficiency in pigeonpea hybrid breeding.

Saxena RK, Saxena KB, Pazhamala LT, Patel K, Parupalli S, Sameerkumar CV, Varshney RK - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Besides this, there are other routine breeding activities which are labor oriented and need more resources.These include breeding and maintenance of new fertility restorers and maintainer lines, diversification of cytoplasm, and incorporation of biotic and abiotic stress resistances.Marker based seed purity assessment, identification of heterotic groups; selection of new fertility restorers are few areas which have already been initiated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics , Patancheru, India.

ABSTRACT
Cytoplasmic genic male sterility (CGMS) based hybrid technology has demonstrated its immense potential in increasing the productivity of various crops, including pigeonpea. This technology has shown promise for breaking the long-standing yield stagnation in pigeonpea. There are difficulties in commercial hybrid seed production due to non-availability of field-oriented technologies such as time-bound assessment of genetic purity of hybrid seeds. Besides this, there are other routine breeding activities which are labor oriented and need more resources. These include breeding and maintenance of new fertility restorers and maintainer lines, diversification of cytoplasm, and incorporation of biotic and abiotic stress resistances. The recent progress in genomics research could accelerate the existing traditional efforts to strengthen the hybrid breeding technology. Marker based seed purity assessment, identification of heterotic groups; selection of new fertility restorers are few areas which have already been initiated. In this paper efforts have been made to identify critical areas and opportunities where genomics can play a leading role and assist breeders in accelerating various activities related to breeding and commercialization of pigeonpea hybrids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trends in pigeonpea yield from year 1961 to year 2013.
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Figure 1: Trends in pigeonpea yield from year 1961 to year 2013.

Mentions: Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh] is an important pulse crop of rainfed and semi-arid regions of Asia, Africa and the Caribbean islands. India accounts for over 85% of the global area of 4.6 million hectares (Table 1). Globally, it is grown under low input environments, primarily as an intercrop with early maturing cereals. Pigeonpea is a major protein supplement for small holding farming families. Pigeonpea is also known for improving soil nutrition by fixing atmospheric nitrogen, releasing soil-bound phosphorus and recycling micro-nutrients. Its extensive root mass and leaf fall are known for improving soil structure and water infiltration in the soil (Saxena, 2008). Pigeonpea varietal improvement program started in India in 1931 with selection from landraces for traits such as seed size, fusarium wilt, plant type, and yield (Ramanujam and Singh, 1981). During this period over 100 pigeonpea cultivars have been released in India (http://www.iipr.res.in/aicrp.html); but the crop productivity remained stagnant (Figure 1). This is a matter of concern in view of increasing population and reducing per capita availability of protein that led to malnutrition among growing children and women, in particular. Considering the above mentioned constraints, new scientific approaches and tools are needed to raise the productivity of this important pulse crop. In this context, cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)-based hybrid technology was developed and the world’s first pigeonpea commercial hybrid namely; ICPH 2671 was released, with 46% yield advantage in farmers’ field (Saxena et al., 2013). This is considered a milestone in the history of pulse breeding so far. In order to popularize hybrids, it is necessary that new high yielding hybrids are bred for different climatic conditions. Besides this, the technology be made grower-friendly. In this regard the new developments in genomics science can be of great help. Beyond doubt, integration of genomics with breeding can enhance the pace of breeding new widely adopted hybrids. The genomics science can be effectively used in the selection of heterotic hybrid male and female parents, incorporation of resistances and stability in the performance, assessment of purity of hybrids and their parents. In this paper, an effort has been made to highlight the potential role that genomics can play in accelerating the pace of hybrid breeding in pigeonpea (Figure 2).


Genomics for greater efficiency in pigeonpea hybrid breeding.

Saxena RK, Saxena KB, Pazhamala LT, Patel K, Parupalli S, Sameerkumar CV, Varshney RK - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Trends in pigeonpea yield from year 1961 to year 2013.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589649&req=5

Figure 1: Trends in pigeonpea yield from year 1961 to year 2013.
Mentions: Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh] is an important pulse crop of rainfed and semi-arid regions of Asia, Africa and the Caribbean islands. India accounts for over 85% of the global area of 4.6 million hectares (Table 1). Globally, it is grown under low input environments, primarily as an intercrop with early maturing cereals. Pigeonpea is a major protein supplement for small holding farming families. Pigeonpea is also known for improving soil nutrition by fixing atmospheric nitrogen, releasing soil-bound phosphorus and recycling micro-nutrients. Its extensive root mass and leaf fall are known for improving soil structure and water infiltration in the soil (Saxena, 2008). Pigeonpea varietal improvement program started in India in 1931 with selection from landraces for traits such as seed size, fusarium wilt, plant type, and yield (Ramanujam and Singh, 1981). During this period over 100 pigeonpea cultivars have been released in India (http://www.iipr.res.in/aicrp.html); but the crop productivity remained stagnant (Figure 1). This is a matter of concern in view of increasing population and reducing per capita availability of protein that led to malnutrition among growing children and women, in particular. Considering the above mentioned constraints, new scientific approaches and tools are needed to raise the productivity of this important pulse crop. In this context, cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)-based hybrid technology was developed and the world’s first pigeonpea commercial hybrid namely; ICPH 2671 was released, with 46% yield advantage in farmers’ field (Saxena et al., 2013). This is considered a milestone in the history of pulse breeding so far. In order to popularize hybrids, it is necessary that new high yielding hybrids are bred for different climatic conditions. Besides this, the technology be made grower-friendly. In this regard the new developments in genomics science can be of great help. Beyond doubt, integration of genomics with breeding can enhance the pace of breeding new widely adopted hybrids. The genomics science can be effectively used in the selection of heterotic hybrid male and female parents, incorporation of resistances and stability in the performance, assessment of purity of hybrids and their parents. In this paper, an effort has been made to highlight the potential role that genomics can play in accelerating the pace of hybrid breeding in pigeonpea (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Besides this, there are other routine breeding activities which are labor oriented and need more resources.These include breeding and maintenance of new fertility restorers and maintainer lines, diversification of cytoplasm, and incorporation of biotic and abiotic stress resistances.Marker based seed purity assessment, identification of heterotic groups; selection of new fertility restorers are few areas which have already been initiated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics , Patancheru, India.

ABSTRACT
Cytoplasmic genic male sterility (CGMS) based hybrid technology has demonstrated its immense potential in increasing the productivity of various crops, including pigeonpea. This technology has shown promise for breaking the long-standing yield stagnation in pigeonpea. There are difficulties in commercial hybrid seed production due to non-availability of field-oriented technologies such as time-bound assessment of genetic purity of hybrid seeds. Besides this, there are other routine breeding activities which are labor oriented and need more resources. These include breeding and maintenance of new fertility restorers and maintainer lines, diversification of cytoplasm, and incorporation of biotic and abiotic stress resistances. The recent progress in genomics research could accelerate the existing traditional efforts to strengthen the hybrid breeding technology. Marker based seed purity assessment, identification of heterotic groups; selection of new fertility restorers are few areas which have already been initiated. In this paper efforts have been made to identify critical areas and opportunities where genomics can play a leading role and assist breeders in accelerating various activities related to breeding and commercialization of pigeonpea hybrids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus