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A Prospective Controlled Trial of an Electronic Hand Hygiene Reminder System.

Ellison RT, Barysauskas CM, Rundensteiner EA, Wang D, Barton B - Open Forum Infect Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: Background.  The use of electronic hand hygiene reminder systems has been proposed as an approach to improve hand hygiene compliance among healthcare workers, although information on efficacy is limited.Results.  In the test ICU, the mean number of hand hygiene events increased from 1538 per day at baseline to 1911 per day (24% increase) with the use of a combination of room entry/exit chimes, real-time displays of hand hygiene activity, and manager reports (P < .001); in addition, the ratio of hand hygiene to room entry/exit events also increased from 26.1% to 36.6% (40% increase, P < .001).The performance returned to baseline (1473 hand hygiene events per day) during the follow-up phase.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Department of Medicine.

ABSTRACT
Background.  The use of electronic hand hygiene reminder systems has been proposed as an approach to improve hand hygiene compliance among healthcare workers, although information on efficacy is limited. We prospectively assessed whether hand hygiene activities among healthcare workers could be increased using an electronic hand hygiene monitoring and reminder system. Methods.  A prospective controlled clinical trial was conducted in 2 medical intensive care units (ICUs) at an academic medical center with comparable patient populations, healthcare staff, and physical layout. Hand hygiene activity was monitored concurrently in both ICUs, and the reminder system was installed in the test ICU. The reminder system was tested during 3 administered phases including: room entry/exit chimes, display of real-time hand hygiene activity, and a combination of the 2. Results.  In the test ICU, the mean number of hand hygiene events increased from 1538 per day at baseline to 1911 per day (24% increase) with the use of a combination of room entry/exit chimes, real-time displays of hand hygiene activity, and manager reports (P < .001); in addition, the ratio of hand hygiene to room entry/exit events also increased from 26.1% to 36.6% (40% increase, P < .001). The performance returned to baseline (1473 hand hygiene events per day) during the follow-up phase. There was no significant change in hand hygiene activity in the control ICU during the course of the trial. Conclusions.  In an ICU setting, an electronic hand hygiene reminder system that provided real-time feedback on overall unit-wide hand hygiene performance significantly increased hand hygiene activity.

No MeSH data available.


Real-time hand hygiene activity screensaver that was installed on 5 computer terminals within the test intensive care unit (ICU), which would be visible to the staff when computer terminals were not in use.
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OFV121F1: Real-time hand hygiene activity screensaver that was installed on 5 computer terminals within the test intensive care unit (ICU), which would be visible to the staff when computer terminals were not in use.

Mentions: Electronic hand hygiene alcohol/soap dispensers were installed at all locations used by staff for hand hygiene within each ICU. Doorway entry/exit monitors were installed at the entrance of all patient rooms within the test ICU (n = 16) and programmed to provide a soft chime reminder on room entry/exit. Doorway entry/exit monitors were also installed at the entrance of 5 of 15 patient rooms within the control ICU without the programmed chime reminder to allow for the comparison of room entry/exit events in comparable room locations between the 2 ICUs. Every dispenser and doorway entry/exit monitor communicated through a wireless network to an electronic database, which collected the date and time of each dispense and room entry/exit event. In addition, the use of active complex event processing allowed for a continuous real-time display of the proportion of the total number of hand hygiene dispenser activations and room entry/exit events for the preceding 60 minutes. The system updated the display approximately 5 to 10 seconds after each event (dispenser activation or room entry/exit event), but it did not capture the identity of the individual responsible for each event. The continuous real-time rate of hand hygiene activity was displayed as a “screensaver” on 5 centrally located computers in the test ICU (Figure 1).Figure 1.


A Prospective Controlled Trial of an Electronic Hand Hygiene Reminder System.

Ellison RT, Barysauskas CM, Rundensteiner EA, Wang D, Barton B - Open Forum Infect Dis (2015)

Real-time hand hygiene activity screensaver that was installed on 5 computer terminals within the test intensive care unit (ICU), which would be visible to the staff when computer terminals were not in use.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589647&req=5

OFV121F1: Real-time hand hygiene activity screensaver that was installed on 5 computer terminals within the test intensive care unit (ICU), which would be visible to the staff when computer terminals were not in use.
Mentions: Electronic hand hygiene alcohol/soap dispensers were installed at all locations used by staff for hand hygiene within each ICU. Doorway entry/exit monitors were installed at the entrance of all patient rooms within the test ICU (n = 16) and programmed to provide a soft chime reminder on room entry/exit. Doorway entry/exit monitors were also installed at the entrance of 5 of 15 patient rooms within the control ICU without the programmed chime reminder to allow for the comparison of room entry/exit events in comparable room locations between the 2 ICUs. Every dispenser and doorway entry/exit monitor communicated through a wireless network to an electronic database, which collected the date and time of each dispense and room entry/exit event. In addition, the use of active complex event processing allowed for a continuous real-time display of the proportion of the total number of hand hygiene dispenser activations and room entry/exit events for the preceding 60 minutes. The system updated the display approximately 5 to 10 seconds after each event (dispenser activation or room entry/exit event), but it did not capture the identity of the individual responsible for each event. The continuous real-time rate of hand hygiene activity was displayed as a “screensaver” on 5 centrally located computers in the test ICU (Figure 1).Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Background.  The use of electronic hand hygiene reminder systems has been proposed as an approach to improve hand hygiene compliance among healthcare workers, although information on efficacy is limited.Results.  In the test ICU, the mean number of hand hygiene events increased from 1538 per day at baseline to 1911 per day (24% increase) with the use of a combination of room entry/exit chimes, real-time displays of hand hygiene activity, and manager reports (P < .001); in addition, the ratio of hand hygiene to room entry/exit events also increased from 26.1% to 36.6% (40% increase, P < .001).The performance returned to baseline (1473 hand hygiene events per day) during the follow-up phase.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Department of Medicine.

ABSTRACT
Background.  The use of electronic hand hygiene reminder systems has been proposed as an approach to improve hand hygiene compliance among healthcare workers, although information on efficacy is limited. We prospectively assessed whether hand hygiene activities among healthcare workers could be increased using an electronic hand hygiene monitoring and reminder system. Methods.  A prospective controlled clinical trial was conducted in 2 medical intensive care units (ICUs) at an academic medical center with comparable patient populations, healthcare staff, and physical layout. Hand hygiene activity was monitored concurrently in both ICUs, and the reminder system was installed in the test ICU. The reminder system was tested during 3 administered phases including: room entry/exit chimes, display of real-time hand hygiene activity, and a combination of the 2. Results.  In the test ICU, the mean number of hand hygiene events increased from 1538 per day at baseline to 1911 per day (24% increase) with the use of a combination of room entry/exit chimes, real-time displays of hand hygiene activity, and manager reports (P < .001); in addition, the ratio of hand hygiene to room entry/exit events also increased from 26.1% to 36.6% (40% increase, P < .001). The performance returned to baseline (1473 hand hygiene events per day) during the follow-up phase. There was no significant change in hand hygiene activity in the control ICU during the course of the trial. Conclusions.  In an ICU setting, an electronic hand hygiene reminder system that provided real-time feedback on overall unit-wide hand hygiene performance significantly increased hand hygiene activity.

No MeSH data available.