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Exercise for Hypertension: A Prescription Update Integrating Existing Recommendations with Emerging Research.

Pescatello LS, MacDonald HV, Lamberti L, Johnson BT - Curr. Hypertens. Rep. (2015)

Bottom Line: Hypertension is the most common, costly, and preventable cardiovascular disease risk factor.Yet, these recommendations differ in the components of the Frequency, Intensity, Time, and Type (FITT) principle of exercise prescription (Ex Rx); the evidence upon which they are based is only of fair methodological quality; and the individual studies upon which they are based generally do not include people with hypertension, which are some of the limitations in this literature.The purposes of this review are to (1) overview the professional exercise recommendations for hypertension in terms of the FITT principle of Ex Rx; (2) discuss new and emerging research related to Ex Rx for hypertension; and (3) present an updated FITT Ex Rx for adults with hypertension that integrates the existing recommendations with this new and emerging research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, College of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, 2095 Hillside Rd, U-1110, Storrs, CT, 06269-1110, USA. Linda.Pescatello@uconn.edu.

ABSTRACT
Hypertension is the most common, costly, and preventable cardiovascular disease risk factor. Numerous professional organizations and committees recommend exercise as initial lifestyle therapy to prevent, treat, and control hypertension. Yet, these recommendations differ in the components of the Frequency, Intensity, Time, and Type (FITT) principle of exercise prescription (Ex Rx); the evidence upon which they are based is only of fair methodological quality; and the individual studies upon which they are based generally do not include people with hypertension, which are some of the limitations in this literature. The purposes of this review are to (1) overview the professional exercise recommendations for hypertension in terms of the FITT principle of Ex Rx; (2) discuss new and emerging research related to Ex Rx for hypertension; and (3) present an updated FITT Ex Rx for adults with hypertension that integrates the existing recommendations with this new and emerging research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Linear regression of the average blood pressure change from baseline following low, moderate, and vigorous intensity exercise. SBP systolic blood pressure. DBP diastolic blood pressure. VO2max maximum oxygen consumption. Black diamond suit indicates SBP, y = -14.9x + 14.0, R2 = 0.998. Black square indicates DBP, y = -5.9x–0.3, R2 = 0.969 (ps < 0.01). Adapted from reference [42]
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Fig2: Linear regression of the average blood pressure change from baseline following low, moderate, and vigorous intensity exercise. SBP systolic blood pressure. DBP diastolic blood pressure. VO2max maximum oxygen consumption. Black diamond suit indicates SBP, y = -14.9x + 14.0, R2 = 0.998. Black square indicates DBP, y = -5.9x–0.3, R2 = 0.969 (ps < 0.01). Adapted from reference [42]

Mentions: Eicher and colleagues [42] examined the antihypertensive effects of three bouts of acute aerobic exercise performed at light (40 % VO2max), moderate (60 % VO2max), and vigorous (a graded maximal exercise stress test to exhaustion or 100 % VO2max) intensity aerobic exercise among 45 middle aged, overweight men with pre- to stage 1 hypertension who were monitored in the laboratory and under ambulatory conditions. Eicher et al. [42] found that for each 10 % increase in relative VO2max, SBP decreased 1.5 mmHg (y = -14.9x + 14.0, R2 = 0.998) and DBP 0.6 mmHg (y = -5.9x–0.3, R2 = 0.969) over the course of the day time hours (Fig. 2). These findings suggest more vigorous levels of acute physical exertion lower BP to greater levels than lower levels of physical exertion among adults with hypertension who are willing and able to tolerate more intense levels of exercise.Fig. 2


Exercise for Hypertension: A Prescription Update Integrating Existing Recommendations with Emerging Research.

Pescatello LS, MacDonald HV, Lamberti L, Johnson BT - Curr. Hypertens. Rep. (2015)

Linear regression of the average blood pressure change from baseline following low, moderate, and vigorous intensity exercise. SBP systolic blood pressure. DBP diastolic blood pressure. VO2max maximum oxygen consumption. Black diamond suit indicates SBP, y = -14.9x + 14.0, R2 = 0.998. Black square indicates DBP, y = -5.9x–0.3, R2 = 0.969 (ps < 0.01). Adapted from reference [42]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589552&req=5

Fig2: Linear regression of the average blood pressure change from baseline following low, moderate, and vigorous intensity exercise. SBP systolic blood pressure. DBP diastolic blood pressure. VO2max maximum oxygen consumption. Black diamond suit indicates SBP, y = -14.9x + 14.0, R2 = 0.998. Black square indicates DBP, y = -5.9x–0.3, R2 = 0.969 (ps < 0.01). Adapted from reference [42]
Mentions: Eicher and colleagues [42] examined the antihypertensive effects of three bouts of acute aerobic exercise performed at light (40 % VO2max), moderate (60 % VO2max), and vigorous (a graded maximal exercise stress test to exhaustion or 100 % VO2max) intensity aerobic exercise among 45 middle aged, overweight men with pre- to stage 1 hypertension who were monitored in the laboratory and under ambulatory conditions. Eicher et al. [42] found that for each 10 % increase in relative VO2max, SBP decreased 1.5 mmHg (y = -14.9x + 14.0, R2 = 0.998) and DBP 0.6 mmHg (y = -5.9x–0.3, R2 = 0.969) over the course of the day time hours (Fig. 2). These findings suggest more vigorous levels of acute physical exertion lower BP to greater levels than lower levels of physical exertion among adults with hypertension who are willing and able to tolerate more intense levels of exercise.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Hypertension is the most common, costly, and preventable cardiovascular disease risk factor.Yet, these recommendations differ in the components of the Frequency, Intensity, Time, and Type (FITT) principle of exercise prescription (Ex Rx); the evidence upon which they are based is only of fair methodological quality; and the individual studies upon which they are based generally do not include people with hypertension, which are some of the limitations in this literature.The purposes of this review are to (1) overview the professional exercise recommendations for hypertension in terms of the FITT principle of Ex Rx; (2) discuss new and emerging research related to Ex Rx for hypertension; and (3) present an updated FITT Ex Rx for adults with hypertension that integrates the existing recommendations with this new and emerging research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, College of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, 2095 Hillside Rd, U-1110, Storrs, CT, 06269-1110, USA. Linda.Pescatello@uconn.edu.

ABSTRACT
Hypertension is the most common, costly, and preventable cardiovascular disease risk factor. Numerous professional organizations and committees recommend exercise as initial lifestyle therapy to prevent, treat, and control hypertension. Yet, these recommendations differ in the components of the Frequency, Intensity, Time, and Type (FITT) principle of exercise prescription (Ex Rx); the evidence upon which they are based is only of fair methodological quality; and the individual studies upon which they are based generally do not include people with hypertension, which are some of the limitations in this literature. The purposes of this review are to (1) overview the professional exercise recommendations for hypertension in terms of the FITT principle of Ex Rx; (2) discuss new and emerging research related to Ex Rx for hypertension; and (3) present an updated FITT Ex Rx for adults with hypertension that integrates the existing recommendations with this new and emerging research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus