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Gradual Reduction in Sodium Content in Cooked Ham, with Corresponding Change in Sensorial Properties Measured by Sensory Evaluation and a Multimodal Machine Vision System.

Greiff K, Mathiassen JR, Misimi E, Hersleth M, Aursand IG - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The multimodal machine vision system showed changes in lightness, as a function of reduced salt content.Compared to the reference ham (3.4% salt), a replacement of Na(+)-ions by K(+)-ions of 25% gave no significant changes in WHC, moisture, pH, expressed moisture, the sensory profile attributes or the surface lightness and shininess.A further reduction of salt down to 1.7-1.4% salt, led to a decrease in WHC and an increase in expressible moisture.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: SINTEF Fisheries and Aquaculture, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Biotechnology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

ABSTRACT
The European diet today generally contains too much sodium (Na(+)). A partial substitution of NaCl by KCl has shown to be a promising method for reducing sodium content. The aim of this work was to investigate the sensorial changes of cooked ham with reduced sodium content. Traditional sensorial evaluation and objective multimodal machine vision were used. The salt content in the hams was decreased from 3.4% to 1.4%, and 25% of the Na(+) was replaced by K(+). The salt reduction had highest influence on the sensory attributes salty taste, after taste, tenderness, hardness and color hue. The multimodal machine vision system showed changes in lightness, as a function of reduced salt content. Compared to the reference ham (3.4% salt), a replacement of Na(+)-ions by K(+)-ions of 25% gave no significant changes in WHC, moisture, pH, expressed moisture, the sensory profile attributes or the surface lightness and shininess. A further reduction of salt down to 1.7-1.4% salt, led to a decrease in WHC and an increase in expressible moisture.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustration of the components of light interacting with the imaged raw material, imaged using parallel polarizers (left), crossed polarizers (middle) and the difference between the two (right).
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pone.0137805.g001: Illustration of the components of light interacting with the imaged raw material, imaged using parallel polarizers (left), crossed polarizers (middle) and the difference between the two (right).

Mentions: The experiment sought to separately image the subsurface color and the surface color of the ham slices, in order to separately image the light that was scattered in the subsurface from the light that was directly reflected off the surface. Subsurface imaging revealed the bulk color of the ham near the surface, whereas surface imaging revealed the surface roughness, shininess and other effects such as "mother-of-pearl" appearance commonly seen in some hams. To separate the subsurface from the surface image, two images were acquired–an image I∥ with LED and camera polarizers oriented parallel to each other, and an image I⊥ with the polarizers oriented perpendicular to each other. Image I∥ will image both the subsurface and the surface components, whereas 0049⊥ will image the subsurface components only, and hence the difference I∥—I⊥ between the two images will image only the surface components of the light. This principle of light interactions as a function of polarization state is illustrated in images in Fig 1.


Gradual Reduction in Sodium Content in Cooked Ham, with Corresponding Change in Sensorial Properties Measured by Sensory Evaluation and a Multimodal Machine Vision System.

Greiff K, Mathiassen JR, Misimi E, Hersleth M, Aursand IG - PLoS ONE (2015)

Illustration of the components of light interacting with the imaged raw material, imaged using parallel polarizers (left), crossed polarizers (middle) and the difference between the two (right).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589381&req=5

pone.0137805.g001: Illustration of the components of light interacting with the imaged raw material, imaged using parallel polarizers (left), crossed polarizers (middle) and the difference between the two (right).
Mentions: The experiment sought to separately image the subsurface color and the surface color of the ham slices, in order to separately image the light that was scattered in the subsurface from the light that was directly reflected off the surface. Subsurface imaging revealed the bulk color of the ham near the surface, whereas surface imaging revealed the surface roughness, shininess and other effects such as "mother-of-pearl" appearance commonly seen in some hams. To separate the subsurface from the surface image, two images were acquired–an image I∥ with LED and camera polarizers oriented parallel to each other, and an image I⊥ with the polarizers oriented perpendicular to each other. Image I∥ will image both the subsurface and the surface components, whereas 0049⊥ will image the subsurface components only, and hence the difference I∥—I⊥ between the two images will image only the surface components of the light. This principle of light interactions as a function of polarization state is illustrated in images in Fig 1.

Bottom Line: The multimodal machine vision system showed changes in lightness, as a function of reduced salt content.Compared to the reference ham (3.4% salt), a replacement of Na(+)-ions by K(+)-ions of 25% gave no significant changes in WHC, moisture, pH, expressed moisture, the sensory profile attributes or the surface lightness and shininess.A further reduction of salt down to 1.7-1.4% salt, led to a decrease in WHC and an increase in expressible moisture.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: SINTEF Fisheries and Aquaculture, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Biotechnology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

ABSTRACT
The European diet today generally contains too much sodium (Na(+)). A partial substitution of NaCl by KCl has shown to be a promising method for reducing sodium content. The aim of this work was to investigate the sensorial changes of cooked ham with reduced sodium content. Traditional sensorial evaluation and objective multimodal machine vision were used. The salt content in the hams was decreased from 3.4% to 1.4%, and 25% of the Na(+) was replaced by K(+). The salt reduction had highest influence on the sensory attributes salty taste, after taste, tenderness, hardness and color hue. The multimodal machine vision system showed changes in lightness, as a function of reduced salt content. Compared to the reference ham (3.4% salt), a replacement of Na(+)-ions by K(+)-ions of 25% gave no significant changes in WHC, moisture, pH, expressed moisture, the sensory profile attributes or the surface lightness and shininess. A further reduction of salt down to 1.7-1.4% salt, led to a decrease in WHC and an increase in expressible moisture.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus