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Clarification of the Identity of the Tea Green Leafhopper Based on Morphological Comparison between Chinese and Japanese Specimens.

Qin D, Zhang L, Xiao Q, Dietrich C, Matsumura M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: This species has been variously identified as Empoasca vitis (Goëthe), Jacobiasca formosana (Paoli) and Empoasca onukii Matsuda in Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan, respectively.Recent study of DNA sequence data suggested that treatment of this pest as different species in these three adjacent regions is incorrect and that they were a single species; but the correct scientific name for the species has remained unclear.Consistent with the prior molecular evidence, morphological study shows that the male genital characters of Chinese specimens are the same as those of specimens from Japan, so the correct scientific name of tea green leafhopper in China is Empoasca (Matsumurasca) onukii Matsuda.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Protection Resources and Pest Management of the Ministry of Education, Entomological Museum, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China.

ABSTRACT
Tea green leafhopper is one of the most dominant pests in major tea production regions of East Asia. This species has been variously identified as Empoasca vitis (Goëthe), Jacobiasca formosana (Paoli) and Empoasca onukii Matsuda in Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan, respectively. Recent study of DNA sequence data suggested that treatment of this pest as different species in these three adjacent regions is incorrect and that they were a single species; but the correct scientific name for the species has remained unclear. Consistent with the prior molecular evidence, morphological study shows that the male genital characters of Chinese specimens are the same as those of specimens from Japan, so the correct scientific name of tea green leafhopper in China is Empoasca (Matsumurasca) onukii Matsuda.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Male genitalia of E. (M.) onukii (specimens from China).(A) Male genitalia, left lateral view. (B) Male pygofer, left lateral view. (C, D) Basal part of male pygofer, dorsal view. (E) Ventral pygofer appendage, left lateral view. (F) Anal tube and anal styli, left lateral view. (G, H) Aedeagus, left lateral view. (I) Aedeagus, dorsal view. (J) Connective. (K) Subgenital plate, ventral view. (L) Paramere. (M) Abdominal apodemes. Scale bars: (A)–(M) = 0.1 mm.
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pone.0139202.g005: Male genitalia of E. (M.) onukii (specimens from China).(A) Male genitalia, left lateral view. (B) Male pygofer, left lateral view. (C, D) Basal part of male pygofer, dorsal view. (E) Ventral pygofer appendage, left lateral view. (F) Anal tube and anal styli, left lateral view. (G, H) Aedeagus, left lateral view. (I) Aedeagus, dorsal view. (J) Connective. (K) Subgenital plate, ventral view. (L) Paramere. (M) Abdominal apodemes. Scale bars: (A)–(M) = 0.1 mm.

Mentions: Male basal abdominal apodemes parallel sided, rounded apically, usually surpassing midlength of segment V (Figs 4K and 5M). Pygofer in lateral view with posterior margin rounded, 12–15 stout setae along posterior margin, ventral appendage free from pygofer for most of length, smooth, in lateral view curved upward, apex acuminate and curved posteroventrad, reaching or slightly surpassing posterior margin of pygofer (Figs 4C, 5A, 5B and 5E); in dorsal view sinuate, subapex strongly narrowed and curved laterad, then mediad at apex; dorsum of pygofer with anterior margin sclerotized, bridge narrow to broad, transverse bar and horns well sclerotized, horns slightly curved laterad near apex (Figs 4D, 5C and 5D). Subgenital plates both together broader at base than pygofer in ventral aspect, in profile far exceeding pygofer, base prominently broadened with lamelliform basolateral projection, strongly narrowed distad, apical 1/4 curved dorsad; A-group setae (2–3) near base of plate, shorter than D-group, B-group setae (10–14) small, roughly uniseriate and scattered along dorsal margin in apical half, C-group setae (17–20) starting near 1/4 from base, arranged in double row and merging into single row apically, reaching apex of plate, D-group setae starting basad of C-group macrosetae, roughly biseriate basally with 4 irregular rows distally (Figs 4C, 4D, 4L, 5A and 5K). Paramere in lateral view sinuate, dentifer bowed dorsad, tapered apically, apex truncate, bearing 5–6 distinct teeth and not numerous setae and sensory pits in apical half (Figs 4E, 4F and 5L). Connective lamellate, nearly trapezoidal, slightly longer than maximum width, posterior margin thickened, anterior margin concave medially (Figs 4D, 4F and 5J). Aedeagus in lateral view with preatrium well developed, almost as long as shaft, shaft slender, tubular, straight, diverging from line of preatrium about 30°, with membranous flanges on dorsal side variable in shape, dorsoatrium absent but with pair of ligaments connecting to anal tube laterally, in ventral view aedeagus shaft and preatrium nearly broadened at atrium, gonopore apical (Figs 4C, 4F–4I, 5A and 5G–5I). Anal tube process well developed, in lateral view extended almost half distance to ventral margin of pygofer, smooth, arc-shaped and narrowed distally, apex blunt (Figs 4C, 4J, 5A and 5F).


Clarification of the Identity of the Tea Green Leafhopper Based on Morphological Comparison between Chinese and Japanese Specimens.

Qin D, Zhang L, Xiao Q, Dietrich C, Matsumura M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Male genitalia of E. (M.) onukii (specimens from China).(A) Male genitalia, left lateral view. (B) Male pygofer, left lateral view. (C, D) Basal part of male pygofer, dorsal view. (E) Ventral pygofer appendage, left lateral view. (F) Anal tube and anal styli, left lateral view. (G, H) Aedeagus, left lateral view. (I) Aedeagus, dorsal view. (J) Connective. (K) Subgenital plate, ventral view. (L) Paramere. (M) Abdominal apodemes. Scale bars: (A)–(M) = 0.1 mm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589377&req=5

pone.0139202.g005: Male genitalia of E. (M.) onukii (specimens from China).(A) Male genitalia, left lateral view. (B) Male pygofer, left lateral view. (C, D) Basal part of male pygofer, dorsal view. (E) Ventral pygofer appendage, left lateral view. (F) Anal tube and anal styli, left lateral view. (G, H) Aedeagus, left lateral view. (I) Aedeagus, dorsal view. (J) Connective. (K) Subgenital plate, ventral view. (L) Paramere. (M) Abdominal apodemes. Scale bars: (A)–(M) = 0.1 mm.
Mentions: Male basal abdominal apodemes parallel sided, rounded apically, usually surpassing midlength of segment V (Figs 4K and 5M). Pygofer in lateral view with posterior margin rounded, 12–15 stout setae along posterior margin, ventral appendage free from pygofer for most of length, smooth, in lateral view curved upward, apex acuminate and curved posteroventrad, reaching or slightly surpassing posterior margin of pygofer (Figs 4C, 5A, 5B and 5E); in dorsal view sinuate, subapex strongly narrowed and curved laterad, then mediad at apex; dorsum of pygofer with anterior margin sclerotized, bridge narrow to broad, transverse bar and horns well sclerotized, horns slightly curved laterad near apex (Figs 4D, 5C and 5D). Subgenital plates both together broader at base than pygofer in ventral aspect, in profile far exceeding pygofer, base prominently broadened with lamelliform basolateral projection, strongly narrowed distad, apical 1/4 curved dorsad; A-group setae (2–3) near base of plate, shorter than D-group, B-group setae (10–14) small, roughly uniseriate and scattered along dorsal margin in apical half, C-group setae (17–20) starting near 1/4 from base, arranged in double row and merging into single row apically, reaching apex of plate, D-group setae starting basad of C-group macrosetae, roughly biseriate basally with 4 irregular rows distally (Figs 4C, 4D, 4L, 5A and 5K). Paramere in lateral view sinuate, dentifer bowed dorsad, tapered apically, apex truncate, bearing 5–6 distinct teeth and not numerous setae and sensory pits in apical half (Figs 4E, 4F and 5L). Connective lamellate, nearly trapezoidal, slightly longer than maximum width, posterior margin thickened, anterior margin concave medially (Figs 4D, 4F and 5J). Aedeagus in lateral view with preatrium well developed, almost as long as shaft, shaft slender, tubular, straight, diverging from line of preatrium about 30°, with membranous flanges on dorsal side variable in shape, dorsoatrium absent but with pair of ligaments connecting to anal tube laterally, in ventral view aedeagus shaft and preatrium nearly broadened at atrium, gonopore apical (Figs 4C, 4F–4I, 5A and 5G–5I). Anal tube process well developed, in lateral view extended almost half distance to ventral margin of pygofer, smooth, arc-shaped and narrowed distally, apex blunt (Figs 4C, 4J, 5A and 5F).

Bottom Line: This species has been variously identified as Empoasca vitis (Goëthe), Jacobiasca formosana (Paoli) and Empoasca onukii Matsuda in Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan, respectively.Recent study of DNA sequence data suggested that treatment of this pest as different species in these three adjacent regions is incorrect and that they were a single species; but the correct scientific name for the species has remained unclear.Consistent with the prior molecular evidence, morphological study shows that the male genital characters of Chinese specimens are the same as those of specimens from Japan, so the correct scientific name of tea green leafhopper in China is Empoasca (Matsumurasca) onukii Matsuda.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Protection Resources and Pest Management of the Ministry of Education, Entomological Museum, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China.

ABSTRACT
Tea green leafhopper is one of the most dominant pests in major tea production regions of East Asia. This species has been variously identified as Empoasca vitis (Goëthe), Jacobiasca formosana (Paoli) and Empoasca onukii Matsuda in Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan, respectively. Recent study of DNA sequence data suggested that treatment of this pest as different species in these three adjacent regions is incorrect and that they were a single species; but the correct scientific name for the species has remained unclear. Consistent with the prior molecular evidence, morphological study shows that the male genital characters of Chinese specimens are the same as those of specimens from Japan, so the correct scientific name of tea green leafhopper in China is Empoasca (Matsumurasca) onukii Matsuda.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus