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Distribution and Feeding Behavior of Omorgus suberosus (Coleoptera: Trogidae) in Lepidochelys olivacea Turtle Nests.

Baena ML, Escobar F, Halffter G, García-Chávez JH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: O. suberosus adults and larvae exhibited an aggregated pattern at both turtle nest densities; however, aggregation was greater in areas of low nest density, where we found the highest proportion of damaged eggs.Under laboratory conditions, the beetles quickly damaged both dead eggs and a mixture of live and dead eggs, but were found to consume live eggs more slowly.We intend to apply these results when making decisions regarding the L. olivacea nests on La Escobilla Beach, one of the most important sites for the conservation of this species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas, Universidad Veracruzana (IIB-UV), Xalapa, Veracruz, México.

ABSTRACT
Omorgus suberosus (Fabricius, 1775) has been identified as a potential predator of the eggs of the turtle Lepidochelys olivacea (Eschscholtz, 1829) on one of the main turtle nesting beaches in the world, La Escobilla in Oaxaca, Mexico. This study presents an analysis of the spatio-temporal distribution of the beetle on this beach (in areas of high and low density of L. olivacea nests over two arrival seasons) and an evaluation, under laboratory conditions, of the probability of damage to the turtle eggs by this beetle. O. suberosus adults and larvae exhibited an aggregated pattern at both turtle nest densities; however, aggregation was greater in areas of low nest density, where we found the highest proportion of damaged eggs. Also, there were fluctuations in the temporal distribution of the adult beetles following the arrival of the turtles on the beach. Under laboratory conditions, the beetles quickly damaged both dead eggs and a mixture of live and dead eggs, but were found to consume live eggs more slowly. This suggests that O. suberosus may be recycling organic material; however, its consumption of live eggs may be sufficient in some cases to interrupt the incubation period of the turtle. We intend to apply these results when making decisions regarding the L. olivacea nests on La Escobilla Beach, one of the most important sites for the conservation of this species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between the frequency of O. suberosus larvae and adults in L. olivacea nests on La Escobilla Beach, Oaxaca, Mexico.The solid line represents the values expected according to the ANCOVA. The dotted lines represent the standard error along the regression line.
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pone.0139538.g003: Relationship between the frequency of O. suberosus larvae and adults in L. olivacea nests on La Escobilla Beach, Oaxaca, Mexico.The solid line represents the values expected according to the ANCOVA. The dotted lines represent the standard error along the regression line.

Mentions: We found that the frequency of adult O. suberosus in the turtle nests was related to the frequency of larvae (Fig 3); however, this was independent of nest density since, and according to the contrast analysis, neither the Y–intercept nor the slope of either density differed significantly (t = 0.629, p = 0.5 for the intercept; t = 1.08, p = 0.28 for the slope).


Distribution and Feeding Behavior of Omorgus suberosus (Coleoptera: Trogidae) in Lepidochelys olivacea Turtle Nests.

Baena ML, Escobar F, Halffter G, García-Chávez JH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relationship between the frequency of O. suberosus larvae and adults in L. olivacea nests on La Escobilla Beach, Oaxaca, Mexico.The solid line represents the values expected according to the ANCOVA. The dotted lines represent the standard error along the regression line.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589367&req=5

pone.0139538.g003: Relationship between the frequency of O. suberosus larvae and adults in L. olivacea nests on La Escobilla Beach, Oaxaca, Mexico.The solid line represents the values expected according to the ANCOVA. The dotted lines represent the standard error along the regression line.
Mentions: We found that the frequency of adult O. suberosus in the turtle nests was related to the frequency of larvae (Fig 3); however, this was independent of nest density since, and according to the contrast analysis, neither the Y–intercept nor the slope of either density differed significantly (t = 0.629, p = 0.5 for the intercept; t = 1.08, p = 0.28 for the slope).

Bottom Line: O. suberosus adults and larvae exhibited an aggregated pattern at both turtle nest densities; however, aggregation was greater in areas of low nest density, where we found the highest proportion of damaged eggs.Under laboratory conditions, the beetles quickly damaged both dead eggs and a mixture of live and dead eggs, but were found to consume live eggs more slowly.We intend to apply these results when making decisions regarding the L. olivacea nests on La Escobilla Beach, one of the most important sites for the conservation of this species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas, Universidad Veracruzana (IIB-UV), Xalapa, Veracruz, México.

ABSTRACT
Omorgus suberosus (Fabricius, 1775) has been identified as a potential predator of the eggs of the turtle Lepidochelys olivacea (Eschscholtz, 1829) on one of the main turtle nesting beaches in the world, La Escobilla in Oaxaca, Mexico. This study presents an analysis of the spatio-temporal distribution of the beetle on this beach (in areas of high and low density of L. olivacea nests over two arrival seasons) and an evaluation, under laboratory conditions, of the probability of damage to the turtle eggs by this beetle. O. suberosus adults and larvae exhibited an aggregated pattern at both turtle nest densities; however, aggregation was greater in areas of low nest density, where we found the highest proportion of damaged eggs. Also, there were fluctuations in the temporal distribution of the adult beetles following the arrival of the turtles on the beach. Under laboratory conditions, the beetles quickly damaged both dead eggs and a mixture of live and dead eggs, but were found to consume live eggs more slowly. This suggests that O. suberosus may be recycling organic material; however, its consumption of live eggs may be sufficient in some cases to interrupt the incubation period of the turtle. We intend to apply these results when making decisions regarding the L. olivacea nests on La Escobilla Beach, one of the most important sites for the conservation of this species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus