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Design and Development of Micro-Power Generating Device for Biomedical Applications of Lab-on-a-Disc.

Joseph K, Ibrahim F, Cho J, Thio TH, Al-Faqheri W, Madou M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We have successfully demonstrated that at the spinning speed of 800 revolutions per minute (RPM) the piezoelectric film-based generator is able to produce up to 24 microwatts using 6 sets of films and the magnetic induction-based generator is capable of producing up to 125 milliwatts using 6 stacks of coil.The heating system was able to achieve a temperature of 58.62 °C at 2200 RPM.This development of lab-on-a-disc micro power generators preserves the portability standards and enhances the future biomedical applications of centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Centre for Innovations in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
The development of micro-power generators for centrifugal microfluidic discs enhances the platform as a green point-of-care diagnostic system and eliminates the need for attaching external peripherals to the disc. In this work, we present micro-power generators that harvest energy from the disc's rotational movement to power biomedical applications on the disc. To implement these ideas, we developed two types of micro-power generators using piezoelectric films and an electromagnetic induction system. The piezoelectric-based generator takes advantage of the film's vibration during the disc's rotational motion, whereas the electromagnetic induction-based generator operates on the principle of current generation in stacks of coil exposed to varying magnetic flux. We have successfully demonstrated that at the spinning speed of 800 revolutions per minute (RPM) the piezoelectric film-based generator is able to produce up to 24 microwatts using 6 sets of films and the magnetic induction-based generator is capable of producing up to 125 milliwatts using 6 stacks of coil. As a proof of concept, a custom made localized heating system was constructed to test the capability of the magnetic induction-based generator. The heating system was able to achieve a temperature of 58.62 °C at 2200 RPM. This development of lab-on-a-disc micro power generators preserves the portability standards and enhances the future biomedical applications of centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Frequency of the voltage generated in comparison with the calculated frequency from the spinning speed of the disc. The black line represents the linear fit of theoretical and experimental data with a linear regression value of R2 = 0.9974 (n = 16). (B) Generated voltage from two coils adjacent to each other with a 60° angle in between. 3D perspective chosen to represent the graph is to show the very minute phase difference between both coils’ outputs, approximately 1.016 ms. (C) The peak voltage generated from a single coil relative to the spinning speed (RPM). Output peak voltage illustrated by the moving average trend line of 2 periods. (D) Power generated relative to the spinning speed and the trendline illustrated with the moving average of 2 periods.
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pone.0136519.g007: (A) Frequency of the voltage generated in comparison with the calculated frequency from the spinning speed of the disc. The black line represents the linear fit of theoretical and experimental data with a linear regression value of R2 = 0.9974 (n = 16). (B) Generated voltage from two coils adjacent to each other with a 60° angle in between. 3D perspective chosen to represent the graph is to show the very minute phase difference between both coils’ outputs, approximately 1.016 ms. (C) The peak voltage generated from a single coil relative to the spinning speed (RPM). Output peak voltage illustrated by the moving average trend line of 2 periods. (D) Power generated relative to the spinning speed and the trendline illustrated with the moving average of 2 periods.

Mentions: The operational principle for this electromagnetic induction system is to control the power output by varying the spinning speed of the disc. In the experiment, the spinning speed contributes to the magnetic field change over time. The spinning speed contributes to the rate (ω) of the coil exposed to the “magnetic field”. The correlation of the spinning speed and the output voltage frequency are shown in Fig 7A. The generated output frequency using the six pairs of magnets results in six times the applied spinning frequency.


Design and Development of Micro-Power Generating Device for Biomedical Applications of Lab-on-a-Disc.

Joseph K, Ibrahim F, Cho J, Thio TH, Al-Faqheri W, Madou M - PLoS ONE (2015)

(A) Frequency of the voltage generated in comparison with the calculated frequency from the spinning speed of the disc. The black line represents the linear fit of theoretical and experimental data with a linear regression value of R2 = 0.9974 (n = 16). (B) Generated voltage from two coils adjacent to each other with a 60° angle in between. 3D perspective chosen to represent the graph is to show the very minute phase difference between both coils’ outputs, approximately 1.016 ms. (C) The peak voltage generated from a single coil relative to the spinning speed (RPM). Output peak voltage illustrated by the moving average trend line of 2 periods. (D) Power generated relative to the spinning speed and the trendline illustrated with the moving average of 2 periods.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589339&req=5

pone.0136519.g007: (A) Frequency of the voltage generated in comparison with the calculated frequency from the spinning speed of the disc. The black line represents the linear fit of theoretical and experimental data with a linear regression value of R2 = 0.9974 (n = 16). (B) Generated voltage from two coils adjacent to each other with a 60° angle in between. 3D perspective chosen to represent the graph is to show the very minute phase difference between both coils’ outputs, approximately 1.016 ms. (C) The peak voltage generated from a single coil relative to the spinning speed (RPM). Output peak voltage illustrated by the moving average trend line of 2 periods. (D) Power generated relative to the spinning speed and the trendline illustrated with the moving average of 2 periods.
Mentions: The operational principle for this electromagnetic induction system is to control the power output by varying the spinning speed of the disc. In the experiment, the spinning speed contributes to the magnetic field change over time. The spinning speed contributes to the rate (ω) of the coil exposed to the “magnetic field”. The correlation of the spinning speed and the output voltage frequency are shown in Fig 7A. The generated output frequency using the six pairs of magnets results in six times the applied spinning frequency.

Bottom Line: We have successfully demonstrated that at the spinning speed of 800 revolutions per minute (RPM) the piezoelectric film-based generator is able to produce up to 24 microwatts using 6 sets of films and the magnetic induction-based generator is capable of producing up to 125 milliwatts using 6 stacks of coil.The heating system was able to achieve a temperature of 58.62 °C at 2200 RPM.This development of lab-on-a-disc micro power generators preserves the portability standards and enhances the future biomedical applications of centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Centre for Innovations in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
The development of micro-power generators for centrifugal microfluidic discs enhances the platform as a green point-of-care diagnostic system and eliminates the need for attaching external peripherals to the disc. In this work, we present micro-power generators that harvest energy from the disc's rotational movement to power biomedical applications on the disc. To implement these ideas, we developed two types of micro-power generators using piezoelectric films and an electromagnetic induction system. The piezoelectric-based generator takes advantage of the film's vibration during the disc's rotational motion, whereas the electromagnetic induction-based generator operates on the principle of current generation in stacks of coil exposed to varying magnetic flux. We have successfully demonstrated that at the spinning speed of 800 revolutions per minute (RPM) the piezoelectric film-based generator is able to produce up to 24 microwatts using 6 sets of films and the magnetic induction-based generator is capable of producing up to 125 milliwatts using 6 stacks of coil. As a proof of concept, a custom made localized heating system was constructed to test the capability of the magnetic induction-based generator. The heating system was able to achieve a temperature of 58.62 °C at 2200 RPM. This development of lab-on-a-disc micro power generators preserves the portability standards and enhances the future biomedical applications of centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus