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Design and Development of Micro-Power Generating Device for Biomedical Applications of Lab-on-a-Disc.

Joseph K, Ibrahim F, Cho J, Thio TH, Al-Faqheri W, Madou M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We have successfully demonstrated that at the spinning speed of 800 revolutions per minute (RPM) the piezoelectric film-based generator is able to produce up to 24 microwatts using 6 sets of films and the magnetic induction-based generator is capable of producing up to 125 milliwatts using 6 stacks of coil.The heating system was able to achieve a temperature of 58.62 °C at 2200 RPM.This development of lab-on-a-disc micro power generators preserves the portability standards and enhances the future biomedical applications of centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Centre for Innovations in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
The development of micro-power generators for centrifugal microfluidic discs enhances the platform as a green point-of-care diagnostic system and eliminates the need for attaching external peripherals to the disc. In this work, we present micro-power generators that harvest energy from the disc's rotational movement to power biomedical applications on the disc. To implement these ideas, we developed two types of micro-power generators using piezoelectric films and an electromagnetic induction system. The piezoelectric-based generator takes advantage of the film's vibration during the disc's rotational motion, whereas the electromagnetic induction-based generator operates on the principle of current generation in stacks of coil exposed to varying magnetic flux. We have successfully demonstrated that at the spinning speed of 800 revolutions per minute (RPM) the piezoelectric film-based generator is able to produce up to 24 microwatts using 6 sets of films and the magnetic induction-based generator is capable of producing up to 125 milliwatts using 6 stacks of coil. As a proof of concept, a custom made localized heating system was constructed to test the capability of the magnetic induction-based generator. The heating system was able to achieve a temperature of 58.62 °C at 2200 RPM. This development of lab-on-a-disc micro power generators preserves the portability standards and enhances the future biomedical applications of centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

No MeSH data available.


The modular heating disc configuration and the integrated wireless temperature module.
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pone.0136519.g005: The modular heating disc configuration and the integrated wireless temperature module.

Mentions: To demonstrate the capability of the proposed micro-power generator, localized heating on the microfluidic CD was implemented in this work. A heating element was implemented to heat specific areas of the platform. In this experiment, a modular heating disc consisting of a heating element and wireless temperature monitor was stacked on top of the micro-power generator disc (Fig 5). The circuits on the two discs were connected using insulated 18 American Wire Gauge (AWG) copper wires (Fig 5B). The heating element was made from 40 AWG Nickel Chromium wire with resistance of 555 Ω, woven on a Pressure Sensitive Adhesive (PSA) film (Fig 5A). The heating element was electrically insulated with Kapton film which is able to withstand high temperature. To monitor the temperature change caused by the heating element, a digital temperature monitoring system was embedded onto the platform. The temperature monitoring system consists of an ADT7420 digital temperature sensor connected to an ATMEGA328PU microcontroller. Temperature readings were sampled every 240 milliseconds by the ADT7420 and sent to the microcontroller using Two-Wire-Interface (TWI) protocol. The microcontroller the processes the readings and wirelessly-transmits the temperature data to a remote temperature monitoring computer using a pair of ZigBee modules (see Fig 5B). A lithium polymer battery was used to power the microcontroller and the ZigBee module to ensure continuous data transmission. Temperature data received by the remote computer were monitored and recorded using RealTerm terminal program.


Design and Development of Micro-Power Generating Device for Biomedical Applications of Lab-on-a-Disc.

Joseph K, Ibrahim F, Cho J, Thio TH, Al-Faqheri W, Madou M - PLoS ONE (2015)

The modular heating disc configuration and the integrated wireless temperature module.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589339&req=5

pone.0136519.g005: The modular heating disc configuration and the integrated wireless temperature module.
Mentions: To demonstrate the capability of the proposed micro-power generator, localized heating on the microfluidic CD was implemented in this work. A heating element was implemented to heat specific areas of the platform. In this experiment, a modular heating disc consisting of a heating element and wireless temperature monitor was stacked on top of the micro-power generator disc (Fig 5). The circuits on the two discs were connected using insulated 18 American Wire Gauge (AWG) copper wires (Fig 5B). The heating element was made from 40 AWG Nickel Chromium wire with resistance of 555 Ω, woven on a Pressure Sensitive Adhesive (PSA) film (Fig 5A). The heating element was electrically insulated with Kapton film which is able to withstand high temperature. To monitor the temperature change caused by the heating element, a digital temperature monitoring system was embedded onto the platform. The temperature monitoring system consists of an ADT7420 digital temperature sensor connected to an ATMEGA328PU microcontroller. Temperature readings were sampled every 240 milliseconds by the ADT7420 and sent to the microcontroller using Two-Wire-Interface (TWI) protocol. The microcontroller the processes the readings and wirelessly-transmits the temperature data to a remote temperature monitoring computer using a pair of ZigBee modules (see Fig 5B). A lithium polymer battery was used to power the microcontroller and the ZigBee module to ensure continuous data transmission. Temperature data received by the remote computer were monitored and recorded using RealTerm terminal program.

Bottom Line: We have successfully demonstrated that at the spinning speed of 800 revolutions per minute (RPM) the piezoelectric film-based generator is able to produce up to 24 microwatts using 6 sets of films and the magnetic induction-based generator is capable of producing up to 125 milliwatts using 6 stacks of coil.The heating system was able to achieve a temperature of 58.62 °C at 2200 RPM.This development of lab-on-a-disc micro power generators preserves the portability standards and enhances the future biomedical applications of centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Centre for Innovations in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
The development of micro-power generators for centrifugal microfluidic discs enhances the platform as a green point-of-care diagnostic system and eliminates the need for attaching external peripherals to the disc. In this work, we present micro-power generators that harvest energy from the disc's rotational movement to power biomedical applications on the disc. To implement these ideas, we developed two types of micro-power generators using piezoelectric films and an electromagnetic induction system. The piezoelectric-based generator takes advantage of the film's vibration during the disc's rotational motion, whereas the electromagnetic induction-based generator operates on the principle of current generation in stacks of coil exposed to varying magnetic flux. We have successfully demonstrated that at the spinning speed of 800 revolutions per minute (RPM) the piezoelectric film-based generator is able to produce up to 24 microwatts using 6 sets of films and the magnetic induction-based generator is capable of producing up to 125 milliwatts using 6 stacks of coil. As a proof of concept, a custom made localized heating system was constructed to test the capability of the magnetic induction-based generator. The heating system was able to achieve a temperature of 58.62 °C at 2200 RPM. This development of lab-on-a-disc micro power generators preserves the portability standards and enhances the future biomedical applications of centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

No MeSH data available.