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Effect of Media Usage Selection on Social Mobilization Speed: Facebook vs E-Mail.

Wang J, Madnick S, Li X, Alstott J, Velu C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We include other factors that may influence mobilization speed (gender, age, timing, and homophily of information source) in our model as control variables in order to isolate the effect of such factors.We show that, in this experiment, although more people used e-mail to recruit, the mobilization speed of Facebook users was faster than that of those that used e-mail.After controlling for other factors, we show that Facebook users were 1.84 times more likely to register compared to e-mail users in the next period if they have not done so at any point in time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Management Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China.

ABSTRACT
Social mobilization is a process that enlists a large number of people to achieve a goal within a limited time, especially through the use of social media. There is increasing interest in understanding the factors that affect the speed of social mobilization. Based on the Langley Knights competition data set, we analyzed the differences in mobilization speed between users of Facebook and e-mail. We include other factors that may influence mobilization speed (gender, age, timing, and homophily of information source) in our model as control variables in order to isolate the effect of such factors. We show that, in this experiment, although more people used e-mail to recruit, the mobilization speed of Facebook users was faster than that of those that used e-mail. We were also able to measure and show that the mobilization speed for Facebook users was on average seven times faster compared to e-mail before controlling for other factors. After controlling for other factors, we show that Facebook users were 1.84 times more likely to register compared to e-mail users in the next period if they have not done so at any point in time. This finding could provide useful insights for future social mobilization efforts.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The cumulative proportion of non-registration among Facebook users decreases faster than that among e-mail users, which indicates that users of Facebook were mobilized faster than users of e-mail.The dashed curve estimates the cumulative proportion of Facebook users (the solid curve estimates e-mail users) who have not registered for the competition.
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pone.0134811.g002: The cumulative proportion of non-registration among Facebook users decreases faster than that among e-mail users, which indicates that users of Facebook were mobilized faster than users of e-mail.The dashed curve estimates the cumulative proportion of Facebook users (the solid curve estimates e-mail users) who have not registered for the competition.

Mentions: The corresponding Kaplan-Meier type survival curve which plots the cumulative proportion of non-registration among Facebook and e-mail users respectively over time is shown in Fig 2. Among e-mail users, the cumulative proportion of people who have not registered for the competition decreases slower than that among Facebook users. Therefore, the analysis shown in Fig 2 also supports our key result that users of Facebook were mobilized faster than users of e-mail. However, as noted above, there are other traits influencing the mobilization speed, such as gender, age, etc. The goal of our study was to understand the mobilization speed difference between Facebook and e-mail, after controlling for other confounding factors which we turn to in the next section.


Effect of Media Usage Selection on Social Mobilization Speed: Facebook vs E-Mail.

Wang J, Madnick S, Li X, Alstott J, Velu C - PLoS ONE (2015)

The cumulative proportion of non-registration among Facebook users decreases faster than that among e-mail users, which indicates that users of Facebook were mobilized faster than users of e-mail.The dashed curve estimates the cumulative proportion of Facebook users (the solid curve estimates e-mail users) who have not registered for the competition.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589319&req=5

pone.0134811.g002: The cumulative proportion of non-registration among Facebook users decreases faster than that among e-mail users, which indicates that users of Facebook were mobilized faster than users of e-mail.The dashed curve estimates the cumulative proportion of Facebook users (the solid curve estimates e-mail users) who have not registered for the competition.
Mentions: The corresponding Kaplan-Meier type survival curve which plots the cumulative proportion of non-registration among Facebook and e-mail users respectively over time is shown in Fig 2. Among e-mail users, the cumulative proportion of people who have not registered for the competition decreases slower than that among Facebook users. Therefore, the analysis shown in Fig 2 also supports our key result that users of Facebook were mobilized faster than users of e-mail. However, as noted above, there are other traits influencing the mobilization speed, such as gender, age, etc. The goal of our study was to understand the mobilization speed difference between Facebook and e-mail, after controlling for other confounding factors which we turn to in the next section.

Bottom Line: We include other factors that may influence mobilization speed (gender, age, timing, and homophily of information source) in our model as control variables in order to isolate the effect of such factors.We show that, in this experiment, although more people used e-mail to recruit, the mobilization speed of Facebook users was faster than that of those that used e-mail.After controlling for other factors, we show that Facebook users were 1.84 times more likely to register compared to e-mail users in the next period if they have not done so at any point in time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Management Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China.

ABSTRACT
Social mobilization is a process that enlists a large number of people to achieve a goal within a limited time, especially through the use of social media. There is increasing interest in understanding the factors that affect the speed of social mobilization. Based on the Langley Knights competition data set, we analyzed the differences in mobilization speed between users of Facebook and e-mail. We include other factors that may influence mobilization speed (gender, age, timing, and homophily of information source) in our model as control variables in order to isolate the effect of such factors. We show that, in this experiment, although more people used e-mail to recruit, the mobilization speed of Facebook users was faster than that of those that used e-mail. We were also able to measure and show that the mobilization speed for Facebook users was on average seven times faster compared to e-mail before controlling for other factors. After controlling for other factors, we show that Facebook users were 1.84 times more likely to register compared to e-mail users in the next period if they have not done so at any point in time. This finding could provide useful insights for future social mobilization efforts.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus