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Correlation of pelvic incidence with radiographical parameters for acetabular retroversion: a retrospective radiological study.

Tiziani S, Gautier L, Farei-Campagna J, Osterhoff G, Jentzsch T, Nguyen-Kim TD, Werner CM - BMC Med Imaging (2015)

Bottom Line: We therefore hypothesised that these two factors might be part of a specific anatomical variant associated with degenerative changes.Whether this is of any clinical relevance remains, however, unknown.Acetabular retroversion is linked to PI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091, Zurich, Switzerland. simon.tiziani@uzh.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: Pelvic incidence (PI) has been linked to several degenerative processes within the spinopelvic system. Acetabular retroversion is a recognised risk factor for osteoarthritis of the hip. We therefore hypothesised that these two factors might be part of a specific anatomical variant associated with degenerative changes. This study was performed to clarify this issue.

Methods: The pelvic incidence was measured on 589 computertomographical data sets acquired between 2008 and 2010. For 220 patients a 2D rendering in an antero-posterior view of the CT data set was performed to evaluate the parameters of acetabular retroversion. Those included the prominence of the ischial spine sign (PRISS), the cross-over sign (COS) and the posterior wall sign (PWS). Between 477 and 478 hips were evaluated depending on the parameter of retroversion.

Results: The mean pelvic incidence was significantly lower in hips positive for the PRISS and the PWS. However, there were no significant differences between hips positive or negative for the COS.

Discussion: As hypothesised, the lower PI values in PWS and PRISS positive hips suggest a link between PI and retroversion of the acetabulum. Whether this is of any clinical relevance remains, however, unknown.

Conclusion: Acetabular retroversion is linked to PI. In hips where the prominence of the ischial spine sign and/or the posterior wall sign was present, the mean pelvic incidence value was lower.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a Pelvis with no radiographical signs of acetabular retroversion. b Antero-posterior view, showing the cross-over sign on the left side. c Pelvis with the prominence of the ischial spine sign. The arrow indicates the ischial spine projecting into the lower pelvis on the left side. d Showing the posterior wall sign in the left hip. The posterior wall projects more medially then the center of the femoral head
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Fig2: a Pelvis with no radiographical signs of acetabular retroversion. b Antero-posterior view, showing the cross-over sign on the left side. c Pelvis with the prominence of the ischial spine sign. The arrow indicates the ischial spine projecting into the lower pelvis on the left side. d Showing the posterior wall sign in the left hip. The posterior wall projects more medially then the center of the femoral head

Mentions: The PI is the sum of the pelvic tilt and the sacral slope. It is measured by finding the mid-point between the femoral heads, followed by measuring the angle between the line from this midpoint to the middle of the upper edge of S1 in the sagittal view, and a line perpendicular to the upper edge of S1 [21]. In all patients, the PI was measured using CT scans of the abdomen. For this reason PI had to be calculated as the mean of the angles resulting from connecting the middle of the upper edge of S1 and the centres of the femoral heads on both sides rather then the mid-point of their joining line.


Correlation of pelvic incidence with radiographical parameters for acetabular retroversion: a retrospective radiological study.

Tiziani S, Gautier L, Farei-Campagna J, Osterhoff G, Jentzsch T, Nguyen-Kim TD, Werner CM - BMC Med Imaging (2015)

a Pelvis with no radiographical signs of acetabular retroversion. b Antero-posterior view, showing the cross-over sign on the left side. c Pelvis with the prominence of the ischial spine sign. The arrow indicates the ischial spine projecting into the lower pelvis on the left side. d Showing the posterior wall sign in the left hip. The posterior wall projects more medially then the center of the femoral head
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4589032&req=5

Fig2: a Pelvis with no radiographical signs of acetabular retroversion. b Antero-posterior view, showing the cross-over sign on the left side. c Pelvis with the prominence of the ischial spine sign. The arrow indicates the ischial spine projecting into the lower pelvis on the left side. d Showing the posterior wall sign in the left hip. The posterior wall projects more medially then the center of the femoral head
Mentions: The PI is the sum of the pelvic tilt and the sacral slope. It is measured by finding the mid-point between the femoral heads, followed by measuring the angle between the line from this midpoint to the middle of the upper edge of S1 in the sagittal view, and a line perpendicular to the upper edge of S1 [21]. In all patients, the PI was measured using CT scans of the abdomen. For this reason PI had to be calculated as the mean of the angles resulting from connecting the middle of the upper edge of S1 and the centres of the femoral heads on both sides rather then the mid-point of their joining line.

Bottom Line: We therefore hypothesised that these two factors might be part of a specific anatomical variant associated with degenerative changes.Whether this is of any clinical relevance remains, however, unknown.Acetabular retroversion is linked to PI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091, Zurich, Switzerland. simon.tiziani@uzh.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: Pelvic incidence (PI) has been linked to several degenerative processes within the spinopelvic system. Acetabular retroversion is a recognised risk factor for osteoarthritis of the hip. We therefore hypothesised that these two factors might be part of a specific anatomical variant associated with degenerative changes. This study was performed to clarify this issue.

Methods: The pelvic incidence was measured on 589 computertomographical data sets acquired between 2008 and 2010. For 220 patients a 2D rendering in an antero-posterior view of the CT data set was performed to evaluate the parameters of acetabular retroversion. Those included the prominence of the ischial spine sign (PRISS), the cross-over sign (COS) and the posterior wall sign (PWS). Between 477 and 478 hips were evaluated depending on the parameter of retroversion.

Results: The mean pelvic incidence was significantly lower in hips positive for the PRISS and the PWS. However, there were no significant differences between hips positive or negative for the COS.

Discussion: As hypothesised, the lower PI values in PWS and PRISS positive hips suggest a link between PI and retroversion of the acetabulum. Whether this is of any clinical relevance remains, however, unknown.

Conclusion: Acetabular retroversion is linked to PI. In hips where the prominence of the ischial spine sign and/or the posterior wall sign was present, the mean pelvic incidence value was lower.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus