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Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus.

Swamy PS, Hu H, Pattathil S, Maloney VJ, Xiao H, Xue LJ, Chung JD, Johnson VE, Zhu Y, Peter GF, Hahn MG, Mansfield SD, Harding SA, Tsai CJ - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later.Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process.Taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Stomatal responses of WT and transgenic leaves. (A) Stomatal conductance of mature leaves (LPI-15) under well-watered or drought conditions. Error bars are SD of n = 4–10 plants. Statistical significance of treatment effect was determined using the paired two-sample t-test (***P < 0.005; *P < 0.05). Asterisks above the bars are for treatment effects, and inside the bars are for transgenic effects. (B) Stomatal conductance of dark-acclimated mature leaves (LPI-10) in response to light. Error bars are SD of n = 5 control (WT and transgenic control) or transgenic (A1dYB9 and A1dEYB15) plants. Statistical significance was determined by repeated measures two-way ANOVA. ns, no significance based on the Student-Newman-Keuls post-hoc test.
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Figure 6: Stomatal responses of WT and transgenic leaves. (A) Stomatal conductance of mature leaves (LPI-15) under well-watered or drought conditions. Error bars are SD of n = 4–10 plants. Statistical significance of treatment effect was determined using the paired two-sample t-test (***P < 0.005; *P < 0.05). Asterisks above the bars are for treatment effects, and inside the bars are for transgenic effects. (B) Stomatal conductance of dark-acclimated mature leaves (LPI-10) in response to light. Error bars are SD of n = 5 control (WT and transgenic control) or transgenic (A1dYB9 and A1dEYB15) plants. Statistical significance was determined by repeated measures two-way ANOVA. ns, no significance based on the Student-Newman-Keuls post-hoc test.

Mentions: Next, whether another MT-dependent process—the dynamic opening and closing of stomata—might also be affected in the transgenic plants was investigated. Putative changes in MT stability of the guard cells due to tubulin perturbation would be expected to alter stomatal conductance in response to external stimuli. Drought stress is known to induce stomatal closure, as shown by the significant decrease of stomatal conductance in WT (Fig. 6). However, transgenic plants showed delayed stomatal closure in response to drought (Fig. 6A, Supplementary Fig. S5). This slowed response led to the prediction that stomatal opening would also be delayed in the transgenics. Indeed, the rate of stomatal opening in response to light was slower in the transgenics than in the controls, whereas the steady-state stomatal conductance remained similar between genotypes under dark-acclimated or light-saturated conditions (Fig. 6B). These results imply that tubulin PTM perturbation in transgenic poplar altered some MT-dependent aspect of the stomatal response to environmental cues.


Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus.

Swamy PS, Hu H, Pattathil S, Maloney VJ, Xiao H, Xue LJ, Chung JD, Johnson VE, Zhu Y, Peter GF, Hahn MG, Mansfield SD, Harding SA, Tsai CJ - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Stomatal responses of WT and transgenic leaves. (A) Stomatal conductance of mature leaves (LPI-15) under well-watered or drought conditions. Error bars are SD of n = 4–10 plants. Statistical significance of treatment effect was determined using the paired two-sample t-test (***P < 0.005; *P < 0.05). Asterisks above the bars are for treatment effects, and inside the bars are for transgenic effects. (B) Stomatal conductance of dark-acclimated mature leaves (LPI-10) in response to light. Error bars are SD of n = 5 control (WT and transgenic control) or transgenic (A1dYB9 and A1dEYB15) plants. Statistical significance was determined by repeated measures two-way ANOVA. ns, no significance based on the Student-Newman-Keuls post-hoc test.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 6: Stomatal responses of WT and transgenic leaves. (A) Stomatal conductance of mature leaves (LPI-15) under well-watered or drought conditions. Error bars are SD of n = 4–10 plants. Statistical significance of treatment effect was determined using the paired two-sample t-test (***P < 0.005; *P < 0.05). Asterisks above the bars are for treatment effects, and inside the bars are for transgenic effects. (B) Stomatal conductance of dark-acclimated mature leaves (LPI-10) in response to light. Error bars are SD of n = 5 control (WT and transgenic control) or transgenic (A1dYB9 and A1dEYB15) plants. Statistical significance was determined by repeated measures two-way ANOVA. ns, no significance based on the Student-Newman-Keuls post-hoc test.
Mentions: Next, whether another MT-dependent process—the dynamic opening and closing of stomata—might also be affected in the transgenic plants was investigated. Putative changes in MT stability of the guard cells due to tubulin perturbation would be expected to alter stomatal conductance in response to external stimuli. Drought stress is known to induce stomatal closure, as shown by the significant decrease of stomatal conductance in WT (Fig. 6). However, transgenic plants showed delayed stomatal closure in response to drought (Fig. 6A, Supplementary Fig. S5). This slowed response led to the prediction that stomatal opening would also be delayed in the transgenics. Indeed, the rate of stomatal opening in response to light was slower in the transgenics than in the controls, whereas the steady-state stomatal conductance remained similar between genotypes under dark-acclimated or light-saturated conditions (Fig. 6B). These results imply that tubulin PTM perturbation in transgenic poplar altered some MT-dependent aspect of the stomatal response to environmental cues.

Bottom Line: The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later.Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process.Taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA.

No MeSH data available.