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Nitric oxide induces the alternative oxidase pathway in Arabidopsis seedlings deprived of inorganic phosphate.

Royo B, Moran JF, Ratcliffe RG, Gupta KJ - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: The effects of the phosphate supply on growth, the production of NO, respiration, the AOX level and the production of superoxide were compared for wild-type (WT) seedlings and the nitrate reductase double mutant nia.Phosphate deprivation increased NO production in WT roots, and the AOX level and the capacity of the alternative pathway to consume electrons in WT seedlings; whereas the same treatment failed to stimulate NO production and AOX expression in the nia mutant, and the plants had an altered growth phenotype.It is concluded that NO is required for the induction of the AOX pathway when seedlings are grown under phosphate-limiting conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, South Park Road, Oxford OX1 3RB, UK Institute of Agrobiotechnology, IdAB-CSIC-Public University of Navarre-Government of Navarre, Avda. Pamplona 123, E-31192, Mutilva, Navarre, Spain.

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Effect of Pi supply on root growth of Arabidopsis seedlings. (A) Representative images of WT and nia seedlings grown on a medium containing 0 or 1mM Pi at 8 d (upper row) and 15 d (lower row) after germination. For the GSNO treatment, 200 µM GSNO was added to the growth medium. (B) Length of WT and nia plants grown with or without Pi at 8 and 15 d after germination (n=32). Means with different letters are significantly different (one-way ANOVA, P<0.05).
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Figure 1: Effect of Pi supply on root growth of Arabidopsis seedlings. (A) Representative images of WT and nia seedlings grown on a medium containing 0 or 1mM Pi at 8 d (upper row) and 15 d (lower row) after germination. For the GSNO treatment, 200 µM GSNO was added to the growth medium. (B) Length of WT and nia plants grown with or without Pi at 8 and 15 d after germination (n=32). Means with different letters are significantly different (one-way ANOVA, P<0.05).

Mentions: Omitting Pi from the growth medium reduced the total Pi content of both WT and nia seedlings, showing that the treatment was sufficient to cause the onset of P-deficiency (Supplementary Fig. S1). The overall growth of WT seedlings was unaffected by the absence of Pi from the growth medium over 15 d, with no significant difference in size between plants grown on media containing 0 or 1mM Pi (Fig. 1). In contrast the growth of the nia mutants was significantly slower after 8 d in the absence of external Pi, and the effect was even more marked after 15 d (Fig. 1). Measurements of root/shoot ratios showed that omitting Pi from the growth medium increased the ratio for WT plants at days 8 and 15, but had no effect on the nia seedlings by day 15 (Supplementary Fig. S2). Thus the nia mutant is more sensitive to Pi deprivation than the WT plant, indicating the impairment of mechanisms that could contribute to adaptation to low Pi in the mutant.


Nitric oxide induces the alternative oxidase pathway in Arabidopsis seedlings deprived of inorganic phosphate.

Royo B, Moran JF, Ratcliffe RG, Gupta KJ - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Effect of Pi supply on root growth of Arabidopsis seedlings. (A) Representative images of WT and nia seedlings grown on a medium containing 0 or 1mM Pi at 8 d (upper row) and 15 d (lower row) after germination. For the GSNO treatment, 200 µM GSNO was added to the growth medium. (B) Length of WT and nia plants grown with or without Pi at 8 and 15 d after germination (n=32). Means with different letters are significantly different (one-way ANOVA, P<0.05).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588884&req=5

Figure 1: Effect of Pi supply on root growth of Arabidopsis seedlings. (A) Representative images of WT and nia seedlings grown on a medium containing 0 or 1mM Pi at 8 d (upper row) and 15 d (lower row) after germination. For the GSNO treatment, 200 µM GSNO was added to the growth medium. (B) Length of WT and nia plants grown with or without Pi at 8 and 15 d after germination (n=32). Means with different letters are significantly different (one-way ANOVA, P<0.05).
Mentions: Omitting Pi from the growth medium reduced the total Pi content of both WT and nia seedlings, showing that the treatment was sufficient to cause the onset of P-deficiency (Supplementary Fig. S1). The overall growth of WT seedlings was unaffected by the absence of Pi from the growth medium over 15 d, with no significant difference in size between plants grown on media containing 0 or 1mM Pi (Fig. 1). In contrast the growth of the nia mutants was significantly slower after 8 d in the absence of external Pi, and the effect was even more marked after 15 d (Fig. 1). Measurements of root/shoot ratios showed that omitting Pi from the growth medium increased the ratio for WT plants at days 8 and 15, but had no effect on the nia seedlings by day 15 (Supplementary Fig. S2). Thus the nia mutant is more sensitive to Pi deprivation than the WT plant, indicating the impairment of mechanisms that could contribute to adaptation to low Pi in the mutant.

Bottom Line: The effects of the phosphate supply on growth, the production of NO, respiration, the AOX level and the production of superoxide were compared for wild-type (WT) seedlings and the nitrate reductase double mutant nia.Phosphate deprivation increased NO production in WT roots, and the AOX level and the capacity of the alternative pathway to consume electrons in WT seedlings; whereas the same treatment failed to stimulate NO production and AOX expression in the nia mutant, and the plants had an altered growth phenotype.It is concluded that NO is required for the induction of the AOX pathway when seedlings are grown under phosphate-limiting conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, South Park Road, Oxford OX1 3RB, UK Institute of Agrobiotechnology, IdAB-CSIC-Public University of Navarre-Government of Navarre, Avda. Pamplona 123, E-31192, Mutilva, Navarre, Spain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus