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Metabolic risk score and cancer risk: pooled analysis of seven cohorts.

Stocks T, Bjørge T, Ulmer H, Manjer J, Häggström C, Nagel G, Engeland A, Johansen D, Hallmans G, Selmer R, Concin H, Tretli S, Jonsson H, Stattin P - Int J Epidemiol (2015)

Bottom Line: We weighted those factors equally into a standardized metabolic risk score [MRS, mean = 0, standard deviation (SD) = 1], with an individual's level indicated as SDs from the sex- and cohort-specific means.All statistical tests were two-sided.In men, risk per SD MRS was increased by 43% (95% confidence interval: 27-61) for renal cell cancer, 43% (16-76) for liver cancer, 29% (20-38) for colon cancer, 27% (5-54) for oesophageal cancer, 20% (9-31) for rectal cancer, 19% (4-37) for leukaemias, 15% (1-30) for oral cancer and 10% (2-19) for bladder cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases, Genetic Epidemiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden, tanja.stocks@med.lu.se.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hazard ratio (HR, black line) and 95% confidence interval (shaded area) of cancer incidence (A) (n cases = 21 593) and cancer mortality (B) (n cases = 8572) in men, and cancer incidence (C) (n cases = 14 348) and cancer mortality (D) (n cases = 4405) in women, by the metabolic risk score (mean = 0, SD = 1). Models were derived from restricted cubic spline regression, with knots placed at percentiles 5, 35, 65 and 95. Attained age was used as timescale, and models were stratified by cohort and birth year and adjusted for baseline age and smoking status. HRs were corrected for a regression dilution ratio of 0.69 for metabolic risk score by exp(log(HR)/0.69). Participants with values more extreme than ± 3 SD were excluded from the analyses (n excluded ≤ 1845). P-value LR test, linear-spline, refers to likelihood-ratio tests of the linear model nested in a model with addition of splines.
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dyv001-F1: Hazard ratio (HR, black line) and 95% confidence interval (shaded area) of cancer incidence (A) (n cases = 21 593) and cancer mortality (B) (n cases = 8572) in men, and cancer incidence (C) (n cases = 14 348) and cancer mortality (D) (n cases = 4405) in women, by the metabolic risk score (mean = 0, SD = 1). Models were derived from restricted cubic spline regression, with knots placed at percentiles 5, 35, 65 and 95. Attained age was used as timescale, and models were stratified by cohort and birth year and adjusted for baseline age and smoking status. HRs were corrected for a regression dilution ratio of 0.69 for metabolic risk score by exp(log(HR)/0.69). Participants with values more extreme than ± 3 SD were excluded from the analyses (n excluded ≤ 1845). P-value LR test, linear-spline, refers to likelihood-ratio tests of the linear model nested in a model with addition of splines.

Mentions: In spline models, the MRS was linearly and positively associated with incident cancer in both men and women (Figure 1). HRs per SD increment in MRS were 1.05 (95% CI: 1.03–1.08) in men and 1.08 (95% CI: 1.05–1.11) in women. The association was also linear and positive for cancer mortality in women, whereas in men the association was non-linear with no association observed for levels below the mean MRS level, but an increased risk for increasing MRS levels above the mean MRS level (Z = 0). The associations between continuous MRS and cancer incidence and mortality did not differ between Me-Can subcohorts in men or in women (Phet all ≥0.05).Figure 1.


Metabolic risk score and cancer risk: pooled analysis of seven cohorts.

Stocks T, Bjørge T, Ulmer H, Manjer J, Häggström C, Nagel G, Engeland A, Johansen D, Hallmans G, Selmer R, Concin H, Tretli S, Jonsson H, Stattin P - Int J Epidemiol (2015)

Hazard ratio (HR, black line) and 95% confidence interval (shaded area) of cancer incidence (A) (n cases = 21 593) and cancer mortality (B) (n cases = 8572) in men, and cancer incidence (C) (n cases = 14 348) and cancer mortality (D) (n cases = 4405) in women, by the metabolic risk score (mean = 0, SD = 1). Models were derived from restricted cubic spline regression, with knots placed at percentiles 5, 35, 65 and 95. Attained age was used as timescale, and models were stratified by cohort and birth year and adjusted for baseline age and smoking status. HRs were corrected for a regression dilution ratio of 0.69 for metabolic risk score by exp(log(HR)/0.69). Participants with values more extreme than ± 3 SD were excluded from the analyses (n excluded ≤ 1845). P-value LR test, linear-spline, refers to likelihood-ratio tests of the linear model nested in a model with addition of splines.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588859&req=5

dyv001-F1: Hazard ratio (HR, black line) and 95% confidence interval (shaded area) of cancer incidence (A) (n cases = 21 593) and cancer mortality (B) (n cases = 8572) in men, and cancer incidence (C) (n cases = 14 348) and cancer mortality (D) (n cases = 4405) in women, by the metabolic risk score (mean = 0, SD = 1). Models were derived from restricted cubic spline regression, with knots placed at percentiles 5, 35, 65 and 95. Attained age was used as timescale, and models were stratified by cohort and birth year and adjusted for baseline age and smoking status. HRs were corrected for a regression dilution ratio of 0.69 for metabolic risk score by exp(log(HR)/0.69). Participants with values more extreme than ± 3 SD were excluded from the analyses (n excluded ≤ 1845). P-value LR test, linear-spline, refers to likelihood-ratio tests of the linear model nested in a model with addition of splines.
Mentions: In spline models, the MRS was linearly and positively associated with incident cancer in both men and women (Figure 1). HRs per SD increment in MRS were 1.05 (95% CI: 1.03–1.08) in men and 1.08 (95% CI: 1.05–1.11) in women. The association was also linear and positive for cancer mortality in women, whereas in men the association was non-linear with no association observed for levels below the mean MRS level, but an increased risk for increasing MRS levels above the mean MRS level (Z = 0). The associations between continuous MRS and cancer incidence and mortality did not differ between Me-Can subcohorts in men or in women (Phet all ≥0.05).Figure 1.

Bottom Line: We weighted those factors equally into a standardized metabolic risk score [MRS, mean = 0, standard deviation (SD) = 1], with an individual's level indicated as SDs from the sex- and cohort-specific means.All statistical tests were two-sided.In men, risk per SD MRS was increased by 43% (95% confidence interval: 27-61) for renal cell cancer, 43% (16-76) for liver cancer, 29% (20-38) for colon cancer, 27% (5-54) for oesophageal cancer, 20% (9-31) for rectal cancer, 19% (4-37) for leukaemias, 15% (1-30) for oral cancer and 10% (2-19) for bladder cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases, Genetic Epidemiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden, tanja.stocks@med.lu.se.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus