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Correlation between postpartum depression and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: Single center study.

Lee YJ, Yi SW, Ju DH, Lee SS, Sohn WS, Kim IJ - Obstet Gynecol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: One hundred sixty six women were assessed around 10th to 14th days after delivery in Gangneung Asan Hospital, Korea, from September 2011 to March 2012.Premenstrual dysphoric disorder was evaluated retrospectively and was defined as having more than 5 of the following 10 symptoms: breast tenderness, bloating, headache, peripheral edema (hand and foot), depressive symptoms, anger, irritability, anxiety, oversensitivity, and exaggerated mood swings.Among 143 women in the postpartum non-depression group, seven were determined to have PMS, yielding a prevalence rate of 4.9% (7/143).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To describe the prevalence and correlates of the postpartum depression and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

Methods: One hundred sixty six women were assessed around 10th to 14th days after delivery in Gangneung Asan Hospital, Korea, from September 2011 to March 2012. We checked their risk factors for postpartum depressive disorders using the Beck Depression Inventory and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder was evaluated retrospectively and was defined as having more than 5 of the following 10 symptoms: breast tenderness, bloating, headache, peripheral edema (hand and foot), depressive symptoms, anger, irritability, anxiety, oversensitivity, and exaggerated mood swings.

Results: The prevalence rate of postpartum depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale ≥10 and Beck Depression Inventory ≥10 was 13.9% (23/166). We found statistical differences (P<0.01) between the postpartum depression group and the postpartum non-depression group in smoking history, past history of psychiatric problems, and level of marital satisfaction. The prevalence rate of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) was 9% (15/166) and among 23 women in the postpartum depression group, eight were determined to have premenstrual dysphoric disorder, yielding a prevalence rate of 34.8% (8/23). Among 143 women in the postpartum non-depression group, seven were determined to have PMS, yielding a prevalence rate of 4.9% (7/143). A correlation between postpartum depression and PMS was thus found (P<0.01).

Conclusion: PMS appears to be associated with postpartum depression. This means that a hormone-related etiology appears to be one risk factor for postpartum depression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Diagram for the classification of women with postpartum depression and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). a)Ten to fourteen days after delivery; b)Breast tenderness, bloating, headache, peripheral edema (hand and foot), depression symptoms, anger, irritability, anxiety, oversensitivity, and exaggerated mood swings; In 5-7 days premenstruation, before pregnancy. EPDS, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale; BDI, Beck Depression Inventory.
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Figure 1: Diagram for the classification of women with postpartum depression and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). a)Ten to fourteen days after delivery; b)Breast tenderness, bloating, headache, peripheral edema (hand and foot), depression symptoms, anger, irritability, anxiety, oversensitivity, and exaggerated mood swings; In 5-7 days premenstruation, before pregnancy. EPDS, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale; BDI, Beck Depression Inventory.

Mentions: Fig. 1. shows the criteria used to identify PPD and PMDD in the index population. All 23 women with EPDS ≥10 also had a BDI score of over 10. Consequently, 23 women were determined to have PPD by the EPDS and BDI, making the prevalence rate of PPD 13.9% (23/166). The mean EPDS score was 11.86 in the EPDS ≥10 group and 3.35 in the EPDS <10 group. The mean BDI score was 19.00 in the BDI ≥10 group and 5.69 in the BDI <10 group.


Correlation between postpartum depression and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: Single center study.

Lee YJ, Yi SW, Ju DH, Lee SS, Sohn WS, Kim IJ - Obstet Gynecol Sci (2015)

Diagram for the classification of women with postpartum depression and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). a)Ten to fourteen days after delivery; b)Breast tenderness, bloating, headache, peripheral edema (hand and foot), depression symptoms, anger, irritability, anxiety, oversensitivity, and exaggerated mood swings; In 5-7 days premenstruation, before pregnancy. EPDS, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale; BDI, Beck Depression Inventory.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588839&req=5

Figure 1: Diagram for the classification of women with postpartum depression and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). a)Ten to fourteen days after delivery; b)Breast tenderness, bloating, headache, peripheral edema (hand and foot), depression symptoms, anger, irritability, anxiety, oversensitivity, and exaggerated mood swings; In 5-7 days premenstruation, before pregnancy. EPDS, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale; BDI, Beck Depression Inventory.
Mentions: Fig. 1. shows the criteria used to identify PPD and PMDD in the index population. All 23 women with EPDS ≥10 also had a BDI score of over 10. Consequently, 23 women were determined to have PPD by the EPDS and BDI, making the prevalence rate of PPD 13.9% (23/166). The mean EPDS score was 11.86 in the EPDS ≥10 group and 3.35 in the EPDS <10 group. The mean BDI score was 19.00 in the BDI ≥10 group and 5.69 in the BDI <10 group.

Bottom Line: One hundred sixty six women were assessed around 10th to 14th days after delivery in Gangneung Asan Hospital, Korea, from September 2011 to March 2012.Premenstrual dysphoric disorder was evaluated retrospectively and was defined as having more than 5 of the following 10 symptoms: breast tenderness, bloating, headache, peripheral edema (hand and foot), depressive symptoms, anger, irritability, anxiety, oversensitivity, and exaggerated mood swings.Among 143 women in the postpartum non-depression group, seven were determined to have PMS, yielding a prevalence rate of 4.9% (7/143).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To describe the prevalence and correlates of the postpartum depression and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

Methods: One hundred sixty six women were assessed around 10th to 14th days after delivery in Gangneung Asan Hospital, Korea, from September 2011 to March 2012. We checked their risk factors for postpartum depressive disorders using the Beck Depression Inventory and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder was evaluated retrospectively and was defined as having more than 5 of the following 10 symptoms: breast tenderness, bloating, headache, peripheral edema (hand and foot), depressive symptoms, anger, irritability, anxiety, oversensitivity, and exaggerated mood swings.

Results: The prevalence rate of postpartum depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale ≥10 and Beck Depression Inventory ≥10 was 13.9% (23/166). We found statistical differences (P<0.01) between the postpartum depression group and the postpartum non-depression group in smoking history, past history of psychiatric problems, and level of marital satisfaction. The prevalence rate of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) was 9% (15/166) and among 23 women in the postpartum depression group, eight were determined to have premenstrual dysphoric disorder, yielding a prevalence rate of 34.8% (8/23). Among 143 women in the postpartum non-depression group, seven were determined to have PMS, yielding a prevalence rate of 4.9% (7/143). A correlation between postpartum depression and PMS was thus found (P<0.01).

Conclusion: PMS appears to be associated with postpartum depression. This means that a hormone-related etiology appears to be one risk factor for postpartum depression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus