Limits...
Anti-Plaque Efficacy of Herbal and 0.2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate Mouthwash: A Comparative Study.

Prasad KA, John S, Deepika V, Dwijendra KS, Reddy BR, Chincholi S - J Int Oral Health (2015)

Bottom Line: There was no significant difference in the gingival index (GI) and plaque index (PI) scores of the pre-rinsing scores of three groups and mean age of subjects in the three age groups, suggesting selected population for the three groups was homogenous.The difference of post rinsing PI and GI scores between Group A and Group B were statistically non-significant, which means anti-gingivitis and plaque inhibiting properties are similar for both.Within the limitations of this study chlorhexidine gluconate and herbal mouthwash (Hiora) showed similar anti plaque activity with latter showing no side effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Professor, Department of Periodontics, MNR Dental College and Hospital, Sangareddy, Telangana, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Mouthwashes are an adjunct to, not a substitute for, regular brushing and flossing. Chlorohexidine is cationic bis-biguanide broad spectrum antiseptic with both anti-plaque and antibacterial properties. It has side-effects like brownish discoloration of teeth and dorsum of the tongue, taste perturbation, oral mucosal ulceration, etc. To compare the antiplaque efficacy of herbal and chlorohexidine gluconate mouthwash.

Materials and methods: A double-blinded parallel, randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in the Department of Periodontics, MNR Dental College. Totally 100 preclinical dental students were randomized into three groups (0.2% chlorohexidine, Saline and herbal mouthwash). All the groups were made to refrain from their regular mechanical oral hygiene measures and were asked to rinse with given respective mouthwashes for 4 days. The gingival and plaque scores are evaluated on 1(st) day, and 5(th) day, and differences were compared statistically.

Results: There was no significant difference in the gingival index (GI) and plaque index (PI) scores of the pre-rinsing scores of three groups and mean age of subjects in the three age groups, suggesting selected population for the three groups was homogenous. Mean GI and PI scores at the post rinsing stage were least for the Group A, followed by B and C. The difference of post rinsing PI and GI scores between Group A and Group B were statistically non-significant, which means anti-gingivitis and plaque inhibiting properties are similar for both.

Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study chlorhexidine gluconate and herbal mouthwash (Hiora) showed similar anti plaque activity with latter showing no side effects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pre rinse clinical picture.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588801&req=5

Figure 1: Pre rinse clinical picture.

Mentions: Based on the analysis of plaque re-growth studies, gingival index (GI) and plaque index (PI) index score differences were analyzed in three samples for which 150 students were included to provide sufficient sample size for detection. Materials used were chlorhexidine mouthwash (Rexidine, Warren Group, India), herbal mouthwash (Hiora, Himalaya, India), Saline, dispensing bottles, measuring cups and disclosing agent (Alphaplacr, DPI, India), scalars and polishing cups. Indices recorded were GI8 on all teeth except third molars with four sites per tooth-mesial, distal, facial/buccal and palatal/lingual and PI.9 Systematically healthy subjects with GI<1, at the time of examination, presence of 20 teeth with minimum of 5 teeth were enrolled in the study. Subjects with severe mal-aligned teeth, orthodontic appliances, fixed partial denture, removable partial denture, tobacco chewers, smokers and those individuals medically compromised were excluded. Study design: At the beginning of the study the GI and PI scores were recorded in order to assess the oral hygiene status of the subjects. All the recordings were done by the same examiner, the baseline scores were brought down near to 0 by supragingival scaling and polishing and it was confirmed with the of disclosing agent (Figures 1 and 2). Intra oral photographs were taken. Subjects were randomly allocated via simple random sampling technique (lottery method) to the three groups and were asked to refrain from mechanical plaque control (tooth brushing and flossing) but to rinse with mouthwashes as per prescribed therapeutic dose for 5 days. 10 ml of 0.2% chlorhexidine, 5 ml of Hiora and Saline were assigned to Group A, Group B, Group C respectively for rinsing twice daily for 1 min for 5 days. GI and PI scores were recorded by same examiner who was unaware of the mouthwashes, on the 6th day. Statistical comparison of GI and PI scores was done post rinsing for all the three groups by ANOVA and Student’s t-test using disclosing agent for PI. Side effects were evaluated from all the subjects by means of a questionnaire and clinical examination. Questionnaire included yes/no for pain, burning sensation, pruritus, dryness of mouth, taste disturbance, discoloration of teeth, feeling of bitter taste in mouth. The subjects were asked to evaluate the severity of side effects by rating them as mild, moderate or severe. With respect to taste disturbance, subjects were asked to specify which taste (salt, sour, bitter, sweet) had altered in perception.10 In clinical evaluation, the severity of soft tissue irritation, rated as none, change in color, desquamation or presence of aphthae. Discolorations were recorded as absent/present and if present, further classified as mild, moderate or severe (Figure 3). Photographs were taken of those who showed staining of teeth at the end of the study and thorough scaling and polishing was done for them. Subjects were then asked to return their normal oral hygiene measures after the completion of study period.


Anti-Plaque Efficacy of Herbal and 0.2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate Mouthwash: A Comparative Study.

Prasad KA, John S, Deepika V, Dwijendra KS, Reddy BR, Chincholi S - J Int Oral Health (2015)

Pre rinse clinical picture.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588801&req=5

Figure 1: Pre rinse clinical picture.
Mentions: Based on the analysis of plaque re-growth studies, gingival index (GI) and plaque index (PI) index score differences were analyzed in three samples for which 150 students were included to provide sufficient sample size for detection. Materials used were chlorhexidine mouthwash (Rexidine, Warren Group, India), herbal mouthwash (Hiora, Himalaya, India), Saline, dispensing bottles, measuring cups and disclosing agent (Alphaplacr, DPI, India), scalars and polishing cups. Indices recorded were GI8 on all teeth except third molars with four sites per tooth-mesial, distal, facial/buccal and palatal/lingual and PI.9 Systematically healthy subjects with GI<1, at the time of examination, presence of 20 teeth with minimum of 5 teeth were enrolled in the study. Subjects with severe mal-aligned teeth, orthodontic appliances, fixed partial denture, removable partial denture, tobacco chewers, smokers and those individuals medically compromised were excluded. Study design: At the beginning of the study the GI and PI scores were recorded in order to assess the oral hygiene status of the subjects. All the recordings were done by the same examiner, the baseline scores were brought down near to 0 by supragingival scaling and polishing and it was confirmed with the of disclosing agent (Figures 1 and 2). Intra oral photographs were taken. Subjects were randomly allocated via simple random sampling technique (lottery method) to the three groups and were asked to refrain from mechanical plaque control (tooth brushing and flossing) but to rinse with mouthwashes as per prescribed therapeutic dose for 5 days. 10 ml of 0.2% chlorhexidine, 5 ml of Hiora and Saline were assigned to Group A, Group B, Group C respectively for rinsing twice daily for 1 min for 5 days. GI and PI scores were recorded by same examiner who was unaware of the mouthwashes, on the 6th day. Statistical comparison of GI and PI scores was done post rinsing for all the three groups by ANOVA and Student’s t-test using disclosing agent for PI. Side effects were evaluated from all the subjects by means of a questionnaire and clinical examination. Questionnaire included yes/no for pain, burning sensation, pruritus, dryness of mouth, taste disturbance, discoloration of teeth, feeling of bitter taste in mouth. The subjects were asked to evaluate the severity of side effects by rating them as mild, moderate or severe. With respect to taste disturbance, subjects were asked to specify which taste (salt, sour, bitter, sweet) had altered in perception.10 In clinical evaluation, the severity of soft tissue irritation, rated as none, change in color, desquamation or presence of aphthae. Discolorations were recorded as absent/present and if present, further classified as mild, moderate or severe (Figure 3). Photographs were taken of those who showed staining of teeth at the end of the study and thorough scaling and polishing was done for them. Subjects were then asked to return their normal oral hygiene measures after the completion of study period.

Bottom Line: There was no significant difference in the gingival index (GI) and plaque index (PI) scores of the pre-rinsing scores of three groups and mean age of subjects in the three age groups, suggesting selected population for the three groups was homogenous.The difference of post rinsing PI and GI scores between Group A and Group B were statistically non-significant, which means anti-gingivitis and plaque inhibiting properties are similar for both.Within the limitations of this study chlorhexidine gluconate and herbal mouthwash (Hiora) showed similar anti plaque activity with latter showing no side effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Professor, Department of Periodontics, MNR Dental College and Hospital, Sangareddy, Telangana, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Mouthwashes are an adjunct to, not a substitute for, regular brushing and flossing. Chlorohexidine is cationic bis-biguanide broad spectrum antiseptic with both anti-plaque and antibacterial properties. It has side-effects like brownish discoloration of teeth and dorsum of the tongue, taste perturbation, oral mucosal ulceration, etc. To compare the antiplaque efficacy of herbal and chlorohexidine gluconate mouthwash.

Materials and methods: A double-blinded parallel, randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in the Department of Periodontics, MNR Dental College. Totally 100 preclinical dental students were randomized into three groups (0.2% chlorohexidine, Saline and herbal mouthwash). All the groups were made to refrain from their regular mechanical oral hygiene measures and were asked to rinse with given respective mouthwashes for 4 days. The gingival and plaque scores are evaluated on 1(st) day, and 5(th) day, and differences were compared statistically.

Results: There was no significant difference in the gingival index (GI) and plaque index (PI) scores of the pre-rinsing scores of three groups and mean age of subjects in the three age groups, suggesting selected population for the three groups was homogenous. Mean GI and PI scores at the post rinsing stage were least for the Group A, followed by B and C. The difference of post rinsing PI and GI scores between Group A and Group B were statistically non-significant, which means anti-gingivitis and plaque inhibiting properties are similar for both.

Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study chlorhexidine gluconate and herbal mouthwash (Hiora) showed similar anti plaque activity with latter showing no side effects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus