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Contamination of Dentist's Hands with and without Finger Rings.

Naeem A, Saluja SA, Krishna D, Shitanshu M, Arun S, Taseer B - J Int Oral Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Disease prevention is better than its cure.Dentists 20 with rings and 20 without rings were considered.In the present study potentially pathogenic microorganisms were more frequent in dentists who wore finger rings under gloves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Senior Lecturer, Department of Prosthodontics, Career Post Graduate Institute of Dental Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Disease prevention is better than its cure. The role of healthcare worker's hand in the transmission and spread of an infectious disease to the patient is well acknowledged. Indeed, the hands of a health care worker can easily pick potentially pathogenic bacteria and fungi from hand touch surfaces before wearing of gloves. For these microorganisms to multiply rapidly, a moist environment present underneath the gloves acts a good cultivating media. It is also reported that the multiplication rate also increases several folds with the duration of glove use.

Materials and methods: Dentists 20 with rings and 20 without rings were considered. Skin samples from the hand soon after professional hand cleaning and glove disposal were collected. The occurrence of potentially pathogenic fungi and bacteria were examined and investigated disposal were collected. The occurrence of potentially pathogenic fungi and bacteria were examined and investigated with biochemical and cultural laboratory tests.

Results: Bacteria and fungi were significantly more frequent in dentist's hand with rings than those without rings. 63% versus 37% (bacterial prevalence), among the isolated potentially pathogenic microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans.

Conclusion: In the present study potentially pathogenic microorganisms were more frequent in dentists who wore finger rings under gloves.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sample after 48 h.
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Figure 2: Sample after 48 h.

Mentions: Skin samples were collected in the middle of the working day from the dominant hand soon after glove removal and professional hand cleaning. Sterile swabs previously moistened with tubes containing 1 ml of sterile saline solution (0.9% w/v NaCl) were gently rubbed over the complete ventral surface of the hand and around the periphery of finger ring sample. Swabs were immediately transferred onto the plates containing mannitol salt agar and sabouraud dextrose agar plates were incubated aerobically at 28°C and 37°C for 48 h (Figures 1 and 2). Isolates recovered from cultures were preliminarily subjected to microbiological procedures and were identified using BioMerieux equipment, UK. The laboratory procedures were made by courtesy of the Department of Microbiology, Career Medical College, Lucknow. Prevalence of potential pathogenic microorganisms with and without rings was assessed and differences were statistically analyzed.


Contamination of Dentist's Hands with and without Finger Rings.

Naeem A, Saluja SA, Krishna D, Shitanshu M, Arun S, Taseer B - J Int Oral Health (2015)

Sample after 48 h.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588775&req=5

Figure 2: Sample after 48 h.
Mentions: Skin samples were collected in the middle of the working day from the dominant hand soon after glove removal and professional hand cleaning. Sterile swabs previously moistened with tubes containing 1 ml of sterile saline solution (0.9% w/v NaCl) were gently rubbed over the complete ventral surface of the hand and around the periphery of finger ring sample. Swabs were immediately transferred onto the plates containing mannitol salt agar and sabouraud dextrose agar plates were incubated aerobically at 28°C and 37°C for 48 h (Figures 1 and 2). Isolates recovered from cultures were preliminarily subjected to microbiological procedures and were identified using BioMerieux equipment, UK. The laboratory procedures were made by courtesy of the Department of Microbiology, Career Medical College, Lucknow. Prevalence of potential pathogenic microorganisms with and without rings was assessed and differences were statistically analyzed.

Bottom Line: Disease prevention is better than its cure.Dentists 20 with rings and 20 without rings were considered.In the present study potentially pathogenic microorganisms were more frequent in dentists who wore finger rings under gloves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Senior Lecturer, Department of Prosthodontics, Career Post Graduate Institute of Dental Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Disease prevention is better than its cure. The role of healthcare worker's hand in the transmission and spread of an infectious disease to the patient is well acknowledged. Indeed, the hands of a health care worker can easily pick potentially pathogenic bacteria and fungi from hand touch surfaces before wearing of gloves. For these microorganisms to multiply rapidly, a moist environment present underneath the gloves acts a good cultivating media. It is also reported that the multiplication rate also increases several folds with the duration of glove use.

Materials and methods: Dentists 20 with rings and 20 without rings were considered. Skin samples from the hand soon after professional hand cleaning and glove disposal were collected. The occurrence of potentially pathogenic fungi and bacteria were examined and investigated disposal were collected. The occurrence of potentially pathogenic fungi and bacteria were examined and investigated with biochemical and cultural laboratory tests.

Results: Bacteria and fungi were significantly more frequent in dentist's hand with rings than those without rings. 63% versus 37% (bacterial prevalence), among the isolated potentially pathogenic microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans.

Conclusion: In the present study potentially pathogenic microorganisms were more frequent in dentists who wore finger rings under gloves.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus