Limits...
Germline Modification and Engineering in Avian Species.

Lee HJ, Lee HC, Han JY - Mol. Cells (2015)

Bottom Line: The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models.In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased.Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Production of genome-edited animals using germline-competent cells and genetic modification tools has provided opportunities for investigation of biological mechanisms in various organisms. The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models. In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased. Furthermore, germline chimera production through long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has facilitated research on production of genome-edited chickens. Thus, use of avian germline modification is promising for development of novel avian models for research of disease control and various biological mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of germline chimera production using long-term cultured, germline-competent PGCs. Long-term cultured PGCs derived from Korean Oge (KO) (i/i; black feather) are transplanted into blood vessels of stage 14–17 White Leghorn (WL) embryos (I/I; white feather). Sexually matured germline chimeras (I and i) are crossed with KO (i/i). Feather color distinguishes donor PGC-derived progeny (i/i) from the WL/KO hybrid (I/i).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588716&req=5

f2-molce-38-9-743: Schematic representation of germline chimera production using long-term cultured, germline-competent PGCs. Long-term cultured PGCs derived from Korean Oge (KO) (i/i; black feather) are transplanted into blood vessels of stage 14–17 White Leghorn (WL) embryos (I/I; white feather). Sexually matured germline chimeras (I and i) are crossed with KO (i/i). Feather color distinguishes donor PGC-derived progeny (i/i) from the WL/KO hybrid (I/i).

Mentions: Both ESCs and EGCs, however, still showed low germline transmission efficiency. To overcome this problem, researchers used in vitro PGC cultures. Park et al. (2003b) reported that PGCs isolated from embryonic gonads (stage 28) and cultured for 5 or 10 days showed relatively high germline competency (0.9–56.5%). Recently, McGrew and our group reported a chicken PGC in vitro culture system using basic FGF medium. The PGCs proliferated in an unlimited manner in vitro, expressed germness-related genes—including chicken vasa homolog, deleted in azoospermia-like, POUV, SOX2, NANOG and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (CMYC)—and exhibited telomerase activity and unique migratory characteristics when injected into recipient embryos. Furthermore, compared with other germline competent cell lines, they showed markedly higher germline transmission ability when transplanted into recipient embryos (12.5–82.6%) (Fig. 2) (Choi et al., 2010; Macdonald et al., 2010).


Germline Modification and Engineering in Avian Species.

Lee HJ, Lee HC, Han JY - Mol. Cells (2015)

Schematic representation of germline chimera production using long-term cultured, germline-competent PGCs. Long-term cultured PGCs derived from Korean Oge (KO) (i/i; black feather) are transplanted into blood vessels of stage 14–17 White Leghorn (WL) embryos (I/I; white feather). Sexually matured germline chimeras (I and i) are crossed with KO (i/i). Feather color distinguishes donor PGC-derived progeny (i/i) from the WL/KO hybrid (I/i).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588716&req=5

f2-molce-38-9-743: Schematic representation of germline chimera production using long-term cultured, germline-competent PGCs. Long-term cultured PGCs derived from Korean Oge (KO) (i/i; black feather) are transplanted into blood vessels of stage 14–17 White Leghorn (WL) embryos (I/I; white feather). Sexually matured germline chimeras (I and i) are crossed with KO (i/i). Feather color distinguishes donor PGC-derived progeny (i/i) from the WL/KO hybrid (I/i).
Mentions: Both ESCs and EGCs, however, still showed low germline transmission efficiency. To overcome this problem, researchers used in vitro PGC cultures. Park et al. (2003b) reported that PGCs isolated from embryonic gonads (stage 28) and cultured for 5 or 10 days showed relatively high germline competency (0.9–56.5%). Recently, McGrew and our group reported a chicken PGC in vitro culture system using basic FGF medium. The PGCs proliferated in an unlimited manner in vitro, expressed germness-related genes—including chicken vasa homolog, deleted in azoospermia-like, POUV, SOX2, NANOG and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (CMYC)—and exhibited telomerase activity and unique migratory characteristics when injected into recipient embryos. Furthermore, compared with other germline competent cell lines, they showed markedly higher germline transmission ability when transplanted into recipient embryos (12.5–82.6%) (Fig. 2) (Choi et al., 2010; Macdonald et al., 2010).

Bottom Line: The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models.In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased.Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Production of genome-edited animals using germline-competent cells and genetic modification tools has provided opportunities for investigation of biological mechanisms in various organisms. The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models. In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased. Furthermore, germline chimera production through long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has facilitated research on production of genome-edited chickens. Thus, use of avian germline modification is promising for development of novel avian models for research of disease control and various biological mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus