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Germline Modification and Engineering in Avian Species.

Lee HJ, Lee HC, Han JY - Mol. Cells (2015)

Bottom Line: The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models.In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased.Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Production of genome-edited animals using germline-competent cells and genetic modification tools has provided opportunities for investigation of biological mechanisms in various organisms. The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models. In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased. Furthermore, germline chimera production through long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has facilitated research on production of genome-edited chickens. Thus, use of avian germline modification is promising for development of novel avian models for research of disease control and various biological mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chicken PGC migration and settlement during embryonic development. Avian PGCs are dispersed at stage X and move to the germinal crescent at HH stage 4. They then undergo circulation via extra-embryonic blood vessels until settlement in embryonic gonads at HH stage 17. The figure is modified from Nieuwkoop and Sutasurya(1979).
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f1-molce-38-9-743: Chicken PGC migration and settlement during embryonic development. Avian PGCs are dispersed at stage X and move to the germinal crescent at HH stage 4. They then undergo circulation via extra-embryonic blood vessels until settlement in embryonic gonads at HH stage 17. The figure is modified from Nieuwkoop and Sutasurya(1979).

Mentions: To overcome the low germline transmission efficiency of blastodermal cells, primordial germ cells (PGCs), the precursors to germ cells, derived from various embryonic stages have been used in avian species (Chang et al., 1997; Han et al., 2002; Naito et al., 1994; Ono et al., 1998; Park et al., 2003a; 2003b; Tajima et al., 1993). Avian PGCs have a unique development system in terms of origin, specification, proliferation, and differentiation (Tsunekawa et al., 2000). Avian PGCs are dispersed at stage X immediately after oviposition and move to the germinal crescent at Hamburger and Hamilton (HH) stage 4 (Hamburger and Hamilton, 1992). Then, the PGCs enter the circulation via extra-embryonic blood vessels until settling in embryonic gonads at HH stage 17 (Fig. 1) (Nieuwkoop and Sutasurya, 1979). Previous works reported that PGCs isolated from each developmental stage show higher germline transmission efficiency (11.3–95.8%) than that of blastodermal cells when introduced into the bloodstream of recipient embryos (Naito et al., 1994; Tajima et al., 1993).


Germline Modification and Engineering in Avian Species.

Lee HJ, Lee HC, Han JY - Mol. Cells (2015)

Chicken PGC migration and settlement during embryonic development. Avian PGCs are dispersed at stage X and move to the germinal crescent at HH stage 4. They then undergo circulation via extra-embryonic blood vessels until settlement in embryonic gonads at HH stage 17. The figure is modified from Nieuwkoop and Sutasurya(1979).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588716&req=5

f1-molce-38-9-743: Chicken PGC migration and settlement during embryonic development. Avian PGCs are dispersed at stage X and move to the germinal crescent at HH stage 4. They then undergo circulation via extra-embryonic blood vessels until settlement in embryonic gonads at HH stage 17. The figure is modified from Nieuwkoop and Sutasurya(1979).
Mentions: To overcome the low germline transmission efficiency of blastodermal cells, primordial germ cells (PGCs), the precursors to germ cells, derived from various embryonic stages have been used in avian species (Chang et al., 1997; Han et al., 2002; Naito et al., 1994; Ono et al., 1998; Park et al., 2003a; 2003b; Tajima et al., 1993). Avian PGCs have a unique development system in terms of origin, specification, proliferation, and differentiation (Tsunekawa et al., 2000). Avian PGCs are dispersed at stage X immediately after oviposition and move to the germinal crescent at Hamburger and Hamilton (HH) stage 4 (Hamburger and Hamilton, 1992). Then, the PGCs enter the circulation via extra-embryonic blood vessels until settling in embryonic gonads at HH stage 17 (Fig. 1) (Nieuwkoop and Sutasurya, 1979). Previous works reported that PGCs isolated from each developmental stage show higher germline transmission efficiency (11.3–95.8%) than that of blastodermal cells when introduced into the bloodstream of recipient embryos (Naito et al., 1994; Tajima et al., 1993).

Bottom Line: The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models.In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased.Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Production of genome-edited animals using germline-competent cells and genetic modification tools has provided opportunities for investigation of biological mechanisms in various organisms. The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models. In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased. Furthermore, germline chimera production through long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has facilitated research on production of genome-edited chickens. Thus, use of avian germline modification is promising for development of novel avian models for research of disease control and various biological mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus