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The association of sleep-disordered breathing with high cerebral pulsatility might not be related to diffuse small vessel disease. A pilot study.

Castillo PR, Del Brutto OH, Andrade Mde L, Zambrano M, Nader JA - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Bottom Line: The middle cerebral artery pulsatility index was increased in persons with moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing compared with persons who had none-to-mild sleep-disordered breathing (mean [SD] 1.11 [0.12] vs. 1.3 [0.23], P = .01).No significant differences were found in the prevalence of moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities across groups of sleep-disordered breathing (P = .40) or in the mean apnea/hypopnea index across groups of persons with none-to-mild or moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities (P = .16).This pilot study shows that moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing correlates with cerebral pulsatility, but such association might be independent of diffuse small vessel disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL, 32224, USA. castillo.pablo@mayo.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: In a population-based sampling study conducted in community-dwelling older adults living in rural Ecuador, we aimed to assess the relation among sleep-disordered breathing, cerebral pulsatility index, and diffuse small vessel disease.

Methods: Of 25 participants, 9 (36%) had moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing, characterized by an apnea/hypopnea index ≥15 per hour, and 10 (40%) had moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities, graded according to the modified Fazekas scale. Mean (SD) pulsatility index in the middle cerebral artery was 1.18 (0.19) and positively correlated with the apnea/hypopnea index (R = .445, P = .03, [Pearson's correlation coefficient]). The middle cerebral artery pulsatility index was increased in persons with moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing compared with persons who had none-to-mild sleep-disordered breathing (mean [SD] 1.11 [0.12] vs. 1.3 [0.23], P = .01). No significant differences were found in the prevalence of moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities across groups of sleep-disordered breathing (P = .40) or in the mean apnea/hypopnea index across groups of persons with none-to-mild or moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities (P = .16).

Conclusions: This pilot study shows that moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing correlates with cerebral pulsatility, but such association might be independent of diffuse small vessel disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (TR/TE/TI = 9000/120/2500 ms). Both images show severe white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin according to the modified Fazekas scale. Of note is the extension of periventricular lesions into the subcortical white matter and large confluent subcortical foci
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Fig1: Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (TR/TE/TI = 9000/120/2500 ms). Both images show severe white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin according to the modified Fazekas scale. Of note is the extension of periventricular lesions into the subcortical white matter and large confluent subcortical foci

Mentions: As previously detailed, the neuroimaging studies were performed with use of a Philips Intera 1.5T MRI machine (Philips Healthcare) at the Hospital-Clínica Kennedy, Guayaquil [10]. For the current study, the primary focus was on white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) of presumed vascular origin, defined as lesions appearing hyperintense on T2-weighted images that remained bright on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (without cavitation) and graded into mild, moderate, and severe according to the modified Fazekas scale [11]. Mild cases present with periventricular caps or thin lesions and punctate hyperintensities in subcortical white matter. In moderate cases, there is a smooth periventricular halo, and subcortical foci begin to merge. Severe cases are characterized by extension of periventricular lesions into the subcortical white matter and large confluent subcortical foci (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


The association of sleep-disordered breathing with high cerebral pulsatility might not be related to diffuse small vessel disease. A pilot study.

Castillo PR, Del Brutto OH, Andrade Mde L, Zambrano M, Nader JA - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (TR/TE/TI = 9000/120/2500 ms). Both images show severe white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin according to the modified Fazekas scale. Of note is the extension of periventricular lesions into the subcortical white matter and large confluent subcortical foci
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588689&req=5

Fig1: Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (TR/TE/TI = 9000/120/2500 ms). Both images show severe white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin according to the modified Fazekas scale. Of note is the extension of periventricular lesions into the subcortical white matter and large confluent subcortical foci
Mentions: As previously detailed, the neuroimaging studies were performed with use of a Philips Intera 1.5T MRI machine (Philips Healthcare) at the Hospital-Clínica Kennedy, Guayaquil [10]. For the current study, the primary focus was on white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) of presumed vascular origin, defined as lesions appearing hyperintense on T2-weighted images that remained bright on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (without cavitation) and graded into mild, moderate, and severe according to the modified Fazekas scale [11]. Mild cases present with periventricular caps or thin lesions and punctate hyperintensities in subcortical white matter. In moderate cases, there is a smooth periventricular halo, and subcortical foci begin to merge. Severe cases are characterized by extension of periventricular lesions into the subcortical white matter and large confluent subcortical foci (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The middle cerebral artery pulsatility index was increased in persons with moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing compared with persons who had none-to-mild sleep-disordered breathing (mean [SD] 1.11 [0.12] vs. 1.3 [0.23], P = .01).No significant differences were found in the prevalence of moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities across groups of sleep-disordered breathing (P = .40) or in the mean apnea/hypopnea index across groups of persons with none-to-mild or moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities (P = .16).This pilot study shows that moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing correlates with cerebral pulsatility, but such association might be independent of diffuse small vessel disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL, 32224, USA. castillo.pablo@mayo.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: In a population-based sampling study conducted in community-dwelling older adults living in rural Ecuador, we aimed to assess the relation among sleep-disordered breathing, cerebral pulsatility index, and diffuse small vessel disease.

Methods: Of 25 participants, 9 (36%) had moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing, characterized by an apnea/hypopnea index ≥15 per hour, and 10 (40%) had moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities, graded according to the modified Fazekas scale. Mean (SD) pulsatility index in the middle cerebral artery was 1.18 (0.19) and positively correlated with the apnea/hypopnea index (R = .445, P = .03, [Pearson's correlation coefficient]). The middle cerebral artery pulsatility index was increased in persons with moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing compared with persons who had none-to-mild sleep-disordered breathing (mean [SD] 1.11 [0.12] vs. 1.3 [0.23], P = .01). No significant differences were found in the prevalence of moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities across groups of sleep-disordered breathing (P = .40) or in the mean apnea/hypopnea index across groups of persons with none-to-mild or moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities (P = .16).

Conclusions: This pilot study shows that moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing correlates with cerebral pulsatility, but such association might be independent of diffuse small vessel disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus