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Lack of evolution in a leaf beetle that lives on two contrasting host plants.

Gould K, Wilson P - Ecol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: Males did not prefer to mate with females from E. trichocalyx.Females from E. crassifolium did prefer males from E. trichocalyx over males from E. crassifolium, but did not lay more eggs as a result of these matings.We conclude that the beetle populations we studied have not differentiated based on their host plants and may not have even adapted to the better host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology California State University Northridge California 91330-8303.

ABSTRACT
The interactions between plant-eating insects and their hosts have shaped both the insects and the plants, driving evolution of plant defenses and insect specialization. The leaf beetle Trirhabda eriodictyonis (Chrysomelidae) lives on two shrubs with differing defenses: Eriodictyon crassifolium has hairy leaves, whereas E. trichocalyx has resinous leaves. We tested whether these beetles have differentiated onto the two host plants, and if not, whether the beetles prefer the better host plant and prefer mates who are from that host plant. In feeding tests, adult beetles strongly preferred eating E. trichocalyx regardless of which host they came from. In addition, females laid more eggs if they ate E. trichocalyx than E. crassifolium. So, E. trichocalyx is generally the better host. However, beetle mate preference was not in line with food choice. Males did not prefer to mate with females from E. trichocalyx. Females from E. crassifolium did prefer males from E. trichocalyx over males from E. crassifolium, but did not lay more eggs as a result of these matings. We conclude that the beetle populations we studied have not differentiated based on their host plants and may not have even adapted to the better host. Although to humans these host plant defenses differ dramatically, signs that they have caused evolution in the beetles are lacking. The case of T. eriodictyonis stands counter to many other studies that have seen the differentiation of ecotypes and/or adaptive coordination of an herbivore's life cycle based on host plant differences.

No MeSH data available.


Mating preferences. (A) Males attempted to mate in about half the mating trials, with no difference among treatments (G32 = 1.914, P = 0.119). (B) Females on Eriodictyon trichocalyx did not show a preference in potential mates, but females on Eriodictyon crassifolium accepted mating advances from far more Eriodictyon trichocalyx males than Eriodictyon crassifolium males (G32 = 10.305, P = 0.005).
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ece31658-fig-0003: Mating preferences. (A) Males attempted to mate in about half the mating trials, with no difference among treatments (G32 = 1.914, P = 0.119). (B) Females on Eriodictyon trichocalyx did not show a preference in potential mates, but females on Eriodictyon crassifolium accepted mating advances from far more Eriodictyon trichocalyx males than Eriodictyon crassifolium males (G32 = 10.305, P = 0.005).

Mentions: Males tried to mate with about half of the females they were paired with, regardless of treatment (Fig. 3A, G32 = 1.914, P = 0.119). Females were not so catholic in choosing to accept or reject males (Fig. 3B: G32 = 10.305, P = 0.007). Females feeding on E. trichocalyx showed no preference for males from one plant species or the other, but females living on hairy E. crassifolium were almost twice as likely to accept the mating advances of a male if he had lived and fed on sticky E. trichocalyx than if he had fed on E. crassifolium (Tukey‐like comparison, Q = 3.635, four groups, P = 0.005). Of the 51 pairs in which the male and female were both from E. crassifolium, 37% of attempted matings were successful; however, when the female was from E. crassifolium and the male from E. trichocalyx, 78% of attempted matings succeeded.


Lack of evolution in a leaf beetle that lives on two contrasting host plants.

Gould K, Wilson P - Ecol Evol (2015)

Mating preferences. (A) Males attempted to mate in about half the mating trials, with no difference among treatments (G32 = 1.914, P = 0.119). (B) Females on Eriodictyon trichocalyx did not show a preference in potential mates, but females on Eriodictyon crassifolium accepted mating advances from far more Eriodictyon trichocalyx males than Eriodictyon crassifolium males (G32 = 10.305, P = 0.005).
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588663&req=5

ece31658-fig-0003: Mating preferences. (A) Males attempted to mate in about half the mating trials, with no difference among treatments (G32 = 1.914, P = 0.119). (B) Females on Eriodictyon trichocalyx did not show a preference in potential mates, but females on Eriodictyon crassifolium accepted mating advances from far more Eriodictyon trichocalyx males than Eriodictyon crassifolium males (G32 = 10.305, P = 0.005).
Mentions: Males tried to mate with about half of the females they were paired with, regardless of treatment (Fig. 3A, G32 = 1.914, P = 0.119). Females were not so catholic in choosing to accept or reject males (Fig. 3B: G32 = 10.305, P = 0.007). Females feeding on E. trichocalyx showed no preference for males from one plant species or the other, but females living on hairy E. crassifolium were almost twice as likely to accept the mating advances of a male if he had lived and fed on sticky E. trichocalyx than if he had fed on E. crassifolium (Tukey‐like comparison, Q = 3.635, four groups, P = 0.005). Of the 51 pairs in which the male and female were both from E. crassifolium, 37% of attempted matings were successful; however, when the female was from E. crassifolium and the male from E. trichocalyx, 78% of attempted matings succeeded.

Bottom Line: Males did not prefer to mate with females from E. trichocalyx.Females from E. crassifolium did prefer males from E. trichocalyx over males from E. crassifolium, but did not lay more eggs as a result of these matings.We conclude that the beetle populations we studied have not differentiated based on their host plants and may not have even adapted to the better host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology California State University Northridge California 91330-8303.

ABSTRACT
The interactions between plant-eating insects and their hosts have shaped both the insects and the plants, driving evolution of plant defenses and insect specialization. The leaf beetle Trirhabda eriodictyonis (Chrysomelidae) lives on two shrubs with differing defenses: Eriodictyon crassifolium has hairy leaves, whereas E. trichocalyx has resinous leaves. We tested whether these beetles have differentiated onto the two host plants, and if not, whether the beetles prefer the better host plant and prefer mates who are from that host plant. In feeding tests, adult beetles strongly preferred eating E. trichocalyx regardless of which host they came from. In addition, females laid more eggs if they ate E. trichocalyx than E. crassifolium. So, E. trichocalyx is generally the better host. However, beetle mate preference was not in line with food choice. Males did not prefer to mate with females from E. trichocalyx. Females from E. crassifolium did prefer males from E. trichocalyx over males from E. crassifolium, but did not lay more eggs as a result of these matings. We conclude that the beetle populations we studied have not differentiated based on their host plants and may not have even adapted to the better host. Although to humans these host plant defenses differ dramatically, signs that they have caused evolution in the beetles are lacking. The case of T. eriodictyonis stands counter to many other studies that have seen the differentiation of ecotypes and/or adaptive coordination of an herbivore's life cycle based on host plant differences.

No MeSH data available.