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Cuticular waxes in alpine meadow plants: climate effect inferred from latitude gradient in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

Guo Y, Guo N, He Y, Gao J - Ecol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: The average chain length of n-alkanes in both plant and soil linearly increased with increased temperature, whereas reduced with increased aridity index.No significant correlation could be observed between mean annual precipitation and mean precipitation from June to August and the cuticular wax amounts and average chain length.Our results suggest that the survival of some alpine plants in specific environments might be depended on their abilities in adjusting wax deposition on plant leaves, and the alpine meadow plants as a whole respond to climate change, benefiting the stability of alpine meadow ecosystem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Agronomy and Biotechnology Southwest University Chongqing 400716 China.

ABSTRACT
Alpine meadow ecosystems are susceptible to climate changes. Still, climate impact on cuticular wax in alpine meadow plants is poorly understood. Assessing the variations of cuticular wax in alpine meadow plants across different latitudes might be useful for predicting how they may respond to climate change. We studied nine alpine meadows in a climate gradient in the east side of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, with mean annual temperature ranging from -7.7 to 3.2°C. In total, 42 plant species were analyzed for cuticular wax, averaged 16 plant species in each meadow. Only four plant species could be observed in all sampling meadows, including Kobresia humilis,Potentilla nivea,Anaphalis lacteal, and Leontopodium nanum. The amounts of wax compositions and total cuticular wax in the four plant species varied among sampling meadows, but no significant correlation could be observed between them and temperature, precipitation, and aridity index based on plant species level. To analyze the variations of cuticular wax on community level, we averaged the amounts of n-alkanes, aliphatic acids, primary alcohols, and total cuticular wax across all investigated plant species in each sampling site. The mean annual temperature, mean temperature in July, and aridity index were significantly correlated with the averaged amounts of wax compositions and total cuticular wax. The average chain length of n-alkanes in both plant and soil linearly increased with increased temperature, whereas reduced with increased aridity index. No significant correlation could be observed between mean annual precipitation and mean precipitation from June to August and the cuticular wax amounts and average chain length. Our results suggest that the survival of some alpine plants in specific environments might be depended on their abilities in adjusting wax deposition on plant leaves, and the alpine meadow plants as a whole respond to climate change, benefiting the stability of alpine meadow ecosystem.

No MeSH data available.


Relationship between aridity index and carbon preference index and average chain length of n‐alkane across plants and soils in alpine meadows along latitude gradients.
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ece31677-fig-0008: Relationship between aridity index and carbon preference index and average chain length of n‐alkane across plants and soils in alpine meadows along latitude gradients.

Mentions: The ACL and CPI of n‐alkane in plants were calculated across all investigated plant species in each sampling area. The ACL in plants ranged from 28.95 to 29.44, and strong positive linear correlation was observed between ACL and the estimated mean annual temperature and mean temperature in July (Fig. 6). The CPI in plants increased from 6.93 to 7.51 when mean annual temperatures increased from −7.7 to −4.3°C, then decreased first to 6.57 at 0°C, and followed by an increase to 9.53 at 3.2°C, showing significant cubic correlation (R2 = 0.784, P < 0.05). The CPI and ACL in soil ranged from 3.25 to 5.82 and 27.21 to 27.58, respectively, relatively lower than in plants. The CPI in soil linearly decreased, whereas the ACL increased with increased temperatures. There existed no significant relationship between CPI and ACL in plants and soils and mean annual precipitation and mean precipitation from June to August (Fig. 7). The CPI linearly increased, whereas the ACL decreased with increased aridity index except for insignificant relationship between aridity and CPI in plants (Fig. 8).


Cuticular waxes in alpine meadow plants: climate effect inferred from latitude gradient in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

Guo Y, Guo N, He Y, Gao J - Ecol Evol (2015)

Relationship between aridity index and carbon preference index and average chain length of n‐alkane across plants and soils in alpine meadows along latitude gradients.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588662&req=5

ece31677-fig-0008: Relationship between aridity index and carbon preference index and average chain length of n‐alkane across plants and soils in alpine meadows along latitude gradients.
Mentions: The ACL and CPI of n‐alkane in plants were calculated across all investigated plant species in each sampling area. The ACL in plants ranged from 28.95 to 29.44, and strong positive linear correlation was observed between ACL and the estimated mean annual temperature and mean temperature in July (Fig. 6). The CPI in plants increased from 6.93 to 7.51 when mean annual temperatures increased from −7.7 to −4.3°C, then decreased first to 6.57 at 0°C, and followed by an increase to 9.53 at 3.2°C, showing significant cubic correlation (R2 = 0.784, P < 0.05). The CPI and ACL in soil ranged from 3.25 to 5.82 and 27.21 to 27.58, respectively, relatively lower than in plants. The CPI in soil linearly decreased, whereas the ACL increased with increased temperatures. There existed no significant relationship between CPI and ACL in plants and soils and mean annual precipitation and mean precipitation from June to August (Fig. 7). The CPI linearly increased, whereas the ACL decreased with increased aridity index except for insignificant relationship between aridity and CPI in plants (Fig. 8).

Bottom Line: The average chain length of n-alkanes in both plant and soil linearly increased with increased temperature, whereas reduced with increased aridity index.No significant correlation could be observed between mean annual precipitation and mean precipitation from June to August and the cuticular wax amounts and average chain length.Our results suggest that the survival of some alpine plants in specific environments might be depended on their abilities in adjusting wax deposition on plant leaves, and the alpine meadow plants as a whole respond to climate change, benefiting the stability of alpine meadow ecosystem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Agronomy and Biotechnology Southwest University Chongqing 400716 China.

ABSTRACT
Alpine meadow ecosystems are susceptible to climate changes. Still, climate impact on cuticular wax in alpine meadow plants is poorly understood. Assessing the variations of cuticular wax in alpine meadow plants across different latitudes might be useful for predicting how they may respond to climate change. We studied nine alpine meadows in a climate gradient in the east side of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, with mean annual temperature ranging from -7.7 to 3.2°C. In total, 42 plant species were analyzed for cuticular wax, averaged 16 plant species in each meadow. Only four plant species could be observed in all sampling meadows, including Kobresia humilis,Potentilla nivea,Anaphalis lacteal, and Leontopodium nanum. The amounts of wax compositions and total cuticular wax in the four plant species varied among sampling meadows, but no significant correlation could be observed between them and temperature, precipitation, and aridity index based on plant species level. To analyze the variations of cuticular wax on community level, we averaged the amounts of n-alkanes, aliphatic acids, primary alcohols, and total cuticular wax across all investigated plant species in each sampling site. The mean annual temperature, mean temperature in July, and aridity index were significantly correlated with the averaged amounts of wax compositions and total cuticular wax. The average chain length of n-alkanes in both plant and soil linearly increased with increased temperature, whereas reduced with increased aridity index. No significant correlation could be observed between mean annual precipitation and mean precipitation from June to August and the cuticular wax amounts and average chain length. Our results suggest that the survival of some alpine plants in specific environments might be depended on their abilities in adjusting wax deposition on plant leaves, and the alpine meadow plants as a whole respond to climate change, benefiting the stability of alpine meadow ecosystem.

No MeSH data available.