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Macroecology of North American suckers (Catostomidae): tests of Bergmann's and Rapoport's rules.

Jacquemin SJ, Doll JC - Ecol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: Particularly within the Catostominae subfamily, two tribes reflected strong support for Rapoport's rule while two suggested a pattern was present.Conversely, Bergmann's rule was not supported in Catostomidae.This study provides additional information regarding the pervasiveness of these "rules" by expanding inferences in freshwater fishes and specifically addressing the potential for these macroecological patterns to play a role in the distribution of the understudied group Catostomidae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences Wright State University - Lake Campus Celina Ohio 45822.

ABSTRACT
Discerning spatial macroecological patterns in freshwater fishes has broad implications for community assembly, ecosystem dynamics, management, and conservation. This study explores the potential interspecific covariation of geographic range (Rapoport's rule) and body size (Bergmann's rule) with latitude in North American sucker fishes (Cypriniformes: Catostomidae). While numerous tests of Rapoport's and Bergmann's rules are documented in the literature, comparatively few of these studies have specifically tested for these patterns, and none have incorporated information reflecting shared ancestry into analyses of North American freshwater fish through a hierarchical model. This study utilized a hierarchical modeling approach with Bayesian inference to evaluate the role that evolution has played in shaping these distributional corollaries. Rapoport's rule was supported at the tribe level but not across family and subfamily groupings. Particularly within the Catostominae subfamily, two tribes reflected strong support for Rapoport's rule while two suggested a pattern was present. Conversely, Bergmann's rule was not supported in Catostomidae. This study provides additional information regarding the pervasiveness of these "rules" by expanding inferences in freshwater fishes and specifically addressing the potential for these macroecological patterns to play a role in the distribution of the understudied group Catostomidae.

No MeSH data available.


Subfamily level coefficients for the effect of areal range size. Solid points are the medians of the posterior distribution, and error bars represent the bounds of the 95% credible intervals. Violin plots represent the probability mass associated with the coefficient value. The widest cross‐sectional width of the violin plots represents the coefficient value with the highest likelihood. The horizontal dashed line corresponds to an effect of 0.
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ece31637-fig-0002: Subfamily level coefficients for the effect of areal range size. Solid points are the medians of the posterior distribution, and error bars represent the bounds of the 95% credible intervals. Violin plots represent the probability mass associated with the coefficient value. The widest cross‐sectional width of the violin plots represents the coefficient value with the highest likelihood. The horizontal dashed line corresponds to an effect of 0.

Mentions: Interestingly, subfamily level coefficients for the effect of geographic range size (μ1k) were not consistent across subfamilies (Fig. 2). All three subfamilies resulted in 95% credible intervals that overlapped zero (Fig. 2). However, the subfamily Catostominae resulted in 90% credible intervals (0.014–4.234) that did not overlap zero, suggesting a positive effect.


Macroecology of North American suckers (Catostomidae): tests of Bergmann's and Rapoport's rules.

Jacquemin SJ, Doll JC - Ecol Evol (2015)

Subfamily level coefficients for the effect of areal range size. Solid points are the medians of the posterior distribution, and error bars represent the bounds of the 95% credible intervals. Violin plots represent the probability mass associated with the coefficient value. The widest cross‐sectional width of the violin plots represents the coefficient value with the highest likelihood. The horizontal dashed line corresponds to an effect of 0.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588661&req=5

ece31637-fig-0002: Subfamily level coefficients for the effect of areal range size. Solid points are the medians of the posterior distribution, and error bars represent the bounds of the 95% credible intervals. Violin plots represent the probability mass associated with the coefficient value. The widest cross‐sectional width of the violin plots represents the coefficient value with the highest likelihood. The horizontal dashed line corresponds to an effect of 0.
Mentions: Interestingly, subfamily level coefficients for the effect of geographic range size (μ1k) were not consistent across subfamilies (Fig. 2). All three subfamilies resulted in 95% credible intervals that overlapped zero (Fig. 2). However, the subfamily Catostominae resulted in 90% credible intervals (0.014–4.234) that did not overlap zero, suggesting a positive effect.

Bottom Line: Particularly within the Catostominae subfamily, two tribes reflected strong support for Rapoport's rule while two suggested a pattern was present.Conversely, Bergmann's rule was not supported in Catostomidae.This study provides additional information regarding the pervasiveness of these "rules" by expanding inferences in freshwater fishes and specifically addressing the potential for these macroecological patterns to play a role in the distribution of the understudied group Catostomidae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences Wright State University - Lake Campus Celina Ohio 45822.

ABSTRACT
Discerning spatial macroecological patterns in freshwater fishes has broad implications for community assembly, ecosystem dynamics, management, and conservation. This study explores the potential interspecific covariation of geographic range (Rapoport's rule) and body size (Bergmann's rule) with latitude in North American sucker fishes (Cypriniformes: Catostomidae). While numerous tests of Rapoport's and Bergmann's rules are documented in the literature, comparatively few of these studies have specifically tested for these patterns, and none have incorporated information reflecting shared ancestry into analyses of North American freshwater fish through a hierarchical model. This study utilized a hierarchical modeling approach with Bayesian inference to evaluate the role that evolution has played in shaping these distributional corollaries. Rapoport's rule was supported at the tribe level but not across family and subfamily groupings. Particularly within the Catostominae subfamily, two tribes reflected strong support for Rapoport's rule while two suggested a pattern was present. Conversely, Bergmann's rule was not supported in Catostomidae. This study provides additional information regarding the pervasiveness of these "rules" by expanding inferences in freshwater fishes and specifically addressing the potential for these macroecological patterns to play a role in the distribution of the understudied group Catostomidae.

No MeSH data available.