Limits...
Isotopic partitioning by small mammals in the subnivium.

Calandra I, Labonne G, Mathieu O, Henttonen H, Lévêque J, Milloux MJ, Renvoisé É, Montuire S, Navarro N - Ecol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: We analyzed the isotopic composition of ever-growing incisors from species of voles and lemmings in northern Finland trapped in the spring and autumn.We found that resources appear to be reasonably partitioned and largely congruent with phylogeny.Our results reveal that winter resource use can be inferred from the tooth isotopic composition of rodents sampled in the spring, when trapping can be conducted, and that resources appear to be partitioned via competition under the snow.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: GEGENAA - EA 3795 Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne Reims France.

ABSTRACT
In the Arctic, food limitation is one of the driving factors behind small mammal population fluctuations. Active throughout the year, voles and lemmings (arvicoline rodents) are central prey in arctic food webs. Snow cover, however, makes the estimation of their winter diet challenging. We analyzed the isotopic composition of ever-growing incisors from species of voles and lemmings in northern Finland trapped in the spring and autumn. We found that resources appear to be reasonably partitioned and largely congruent with phylogeny. Our results reveal that winter resource use can be inferred from the tooth isotopic composition of rodents sampled in the spring, when trapping can be conducted, and that resources appear to be partitioned via competition under the snow.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Review of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopic compositions (in ‰) of plant types. The ranges for mosses are based on Nadelhoffer et al. (1996), Brooks et al. (1997), McLeman (2006), and Loisel et al. (2009). Ranges for other plant types are summarized from Ben‐David et al. (2001) and Drucker et al. (2010, 2012). gram = graminoids. (B–D) Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of the teeth studied. Black symbols for specimens trapped in spring; white symbols for autumn. (B) Lemmini: Lemmus lemmus (squares) and Myopus schisticolor (diamonds). (C) Clethrionomyini: Myodes glareolus (upright triangles), M. rufocanus (inverted triangles) and M. rutilus (stars). (D) Arvicolini: Microtus agrestis (pentagons) and M. oeconomus (octagons). Note that (A) and (B–D) are not drawn in the same isotopic space.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588660&req=5

ece31653-fig-0001: (A) Review of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopic compositions (in ‰) of plant types. The ranges for mosses are based on Nadelhoffer et al. (1996), Brooks et al. (1997), McLeman (2006), and Loisel et al. (2009). Ranges for other plant types are summarized from Ben‐David et al. (2001) and Drucker et al. (2010, 2012). gram = graminoids. (B–D) Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of the teeth studied. Black symbols for specimens trapped in spring; white symbols for autumn. (B) Lemmini: Lemmus lemmus (squares) and Myopus schisticolor (diamonds). (C) Clethrionomyini: Myodes glareolus (upright triangles), M. rufocanus (inverted triangles) and M. rutilus (stars). (D) Arvicolini: Microtus agrestis (pentagons) and M. oeconomus (octagons). Note that (A) and (B–D) are not drawn in the same isotopic space.

Mentions: Samples of plants probably consumed by Finnish arvicolines were collected from Lapland (mostly from Kilpisjärvi; Table S2), in July 2012. The food pellets fed to the laboratory animals were also included in the analyses. We also included reviews by Ben‐David et al. (2001) and Drucker et al. (2010, 2012) and reviewed the literature on mosses (see Fig. 1A). The shift from one trophic level to the next is classically thought to be approximately +3‰ in δ15N (e.g., Ben‐David and Flaherty 2012).


Isotopic partitioning by small mammals in the subnivium.

Calandra I, Labonne G, Mathieu O, Henttonen H, Lévêque J, Milloux MJ, Renvoisé É, Montuire S, Navarro N - Ecol Evol (2015)

(A) Review of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopic compositions (in ‰) of plant types. The ranges for mosses are based on Nadelhoffer et al. (1996), Brooks et al. (1997), McLeman (2006), and Loisel et al. (2009). Ranges for other plant types are summarized from Ben‐David et al. (2001) and Drucker et al. (2010, 2012). gram = graminoids. (B–D) Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of the teeth studied. Black symbols for specimens trapped in spring; white symbols for autumn. (B) Lemmini: Lemmus lemmus (squares) and Myopus schisticolor (diamonds). (C) Clethrionomyini: Myodes glareolus (upright triangles), M. rufocanus (inverted triangles) and M. rutilus (stars). (D) Arvicolini: Microtus agrestis (pentagons) and M. oeconomus (octagons). Note that (A) and (B–D) are not drawn in the same isotopic space.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588660&req=5

ece31653-fig-0001: (A) Review of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopic compositions (in ‰) of plant types. The ranges for mosses are based on Nadelhoffer et al. (1996), Brooks et al. (1997), McLeman (2006), and Loisel et al. (2009). Ranges for other plant types are summarized from Ben‐David et al. (2001) and Drucker et al. (2010, 2012). gram = graminoids. (B–D) Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of the teeth studied. Black symbols for specimens trapped in spring; white symbols for autumn. (B) Lemmini: Lemmus lemmus (squares) and Myopus schisticolor (diamonds). (C) Clethrionomyini: Myodes glareolus (upright triangles), M. rufocanus (inverted triangles) and M. rutilus (stars). (D) Arvicolini: Microtus agrestis (pentagons) and M. oeconomus (octagons). Note that (A) and (B–D) are not drawn in the same isotopic space.
Mentions: Samples of plants probably consumed by Finnish arvicolines were collected from Lapland (mostly from Kilpisjärvi; Table S2), in July 2012. The food pellets fed to the laboratory animals were also included in the analyses. We also included reviews by Ben‐David et al. (2001) and Drucker et al. (2010, 2012) and reviewed the literature on mosses (see Fig. 1A). The shift from one trophic level to the next is classically thought to be approximately +3‰ in δ15N (e.g., Ben‐David and Flaherty 2012).

Bottom Line: We analyzed the isotopic composition of ever-growing incisors from species of voles and lemmings in northern Finland trapped in the spring and autumn.We found that resources appear to be reasonably partitioned and largely congruent with phylogeny.Our results reveal that winter resource use can be inferred from the tooth isotopic composition of rodents sampled in the spring, when trapping can be conducted, and that resources appear to be partitioned via competition under the snow.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: GEGENAA - EA 3795 Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne Reims France.

ABSTRACT
In the Arctic, food limitation is one of the driving factors behind small mammal population fluctuations. Active throughout the year, voles and lemmings (arvicoline rodents) are central prey in arctic food webs. Snow cover, however, makes the estimation of their winter diet challenging. We analyzed the isotopic composition of ever-growing incisors from species of voles and lemmings in northern Finland trapped in the spring and autumn. We found that resources appear to be reasonably partitioned and largely congruent with phylogeny. Our results reveal that winter resource use can be inferred from the tooth isotopic composition of rodents sampled in the spring, when trapping can be conducted, and that resources appear to be partitioned via competition under the snow.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus