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Effects of landscape matrix on population connectivity of an arboreal mammal, Petaurus breviceps.

Malekian M, Cooper SJ, Saint KM, Lancaster ML, Taylor AC, Carthew SM - Ecol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we examine the effects of landscape matrix on population structure of the sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps) in a fragmented landscape in southeastern South Australia.We found evidence for female philopatry and restricted dispersal distances for females relative to males, suggesting there is male-biased dispersal.The permeability of a cleared agricultural matrix to dispersing gliders was significantly higher than that of a pine matrix, with the gliders dispersing shorter distances across the latter.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Natural Resources Isfahan University of Technology Isfahan 84156-83111 Iran ; School of Biological Sciences The University of Adelaide Adelaide SA 5005 Australia ; Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity The University of Adelaide Adelaide SA 5005 Australia.

ABSTRACT
Ongoing habitat loss and fragmentation is considered a threat to biodiversity as it can create small, isolated populations that are at increased risk of extinction. Tree-dependent species are predicted to be highly sensitive to forest and woodland loss and fragmentation, but few studies have tested the influence of different types of landscape matrix on gene flow and population structure of arboreal species. Here, we examine the effects of landscape matrix on population structure of the sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps) in a fragmented landscape in southeastern South Australia. We collected 250 individuals across 12 native Eucalyptus forest remnants surrounded by cleared agricultural land or exotic Pinus radiata plantations and a large continuous eucalypt forest. Fifteen microsatellite loci were genotyped and analyzed to infer levels of population differentiation and dispersal. Genetic differentiation among most forest patches was evident. We found evidence for female philopatry and restricted dispersal distances for females relative to males, suggesting there is male-biased dispersal. Among the environmental variables, spatial variables including geographic location, minimum distance to neighboring patch, and degree of isolation were the most important in explaining genetic variation. The permeability of a cleared agricultural matrix to dispersing gliders was significantly higher than that of a pine matrix, with the gliders dispersing shorter distances across the latter. Our results added to previous findings for other species of restricted dispersal and connectivity due to habitat fragmentation in the same region, providing valuable information for the development of strategies to improve the connectivity of populations in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

RDAs showing the contribution of spatial and habitat components to genetic structure in Peturus breviceps, for the (A) full model and (B) partial model controlled for habitat variables. Open circles are allele frequencies of each patch displayed in the RDA space, and the vectors show how explainable variables fall along that RDA space and crosses are centroids of environmental variables. DN, minimum distance to neighboring patch; DI, degree of isolation; PS, patch size; PSH, percentage of suitable habitat.
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ece31675-fig-0003: RDAs showing the contribution of spatial and habitat components to genetic structure in Peturus breviceps, for the (A) full model and (B) partial model controlled for habitat variables. Open circles are allele frequencies of each patch displayed in the RDA space, and the vectors show how explainable variables fall along that RDA space and crosses are centroids of environmental variables. DN, minimum distance to neighboring patch; DI, degree of isolation; PS, patch size; PSH, percentage of suitable habitat.

Mentions: A significant relationship between genetic variation and the spatial variables was revealed by the full model of RDA (P = 0.001, Fig. 3A). When the analysis was controlled for habitat variables, we also found a significant association between genetic variation and the spatial variables (P = 0.015, Fig. 3B). Comparing the full model with the partial models indicated that the spatial variables explained 74.1% of the total explainable genetic variance. Habitat variables explained 20.3% of the total variance and spatial and habitat variables had a joint effect of 5.6% on genetic variance. Among the three spatial variables, geographic location showed the longest vector along each RDA axis, explaining 46% of genetic variation (Fig. 3B).


Effects of landscape matrix on population connectivity of an arboreal mammal, Petaurus breviceps.

Malekian M, Cooper SJ, Saint KM, Lancaster ML, Taylor AC, Carthew SM - Ecol Evol (2015)

RDAs showing the contribution of spatial and habitat components to genetic structure in Peturus breviceps, for the (A) full model and (B) partial model controlled for habitat variables. Open circles are allele frequencies of each patch displayed in the RDA space, and the vectors show how explainable variables fall along that RDA space and crosses are centroids of environmental variables. DN, minimum distance to neighboring patch; DI, degree of isolation; PS, patch size; PSH, percentage of suitable habitat.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588655&req=5

ece31675-fig-0003: RDAs showing the contribution of spatial and habitat components to genetic structure in Peturus breviceps, for the (A) full model and (B) partial model controlled for habitat variables. Open circles are allele frequencies of each patch displayed in the RDA space, and the vectors show how explainable variables fall along that RDA space and crosses are centroids of environmental variables. DN, minimum distance to neighboring patch; DI, degree of isolation; PS, patch size; PSH, percentage of suitable habitat.
Mentions: A significant relationship between genetic variation and the spatial variables was revealed by the full model of RDA (P = 0.001, Fig. 3A). When the analysis was controlled for habitat variables, we also found a significant association between genetic variation and the spatial variables (P = 0.015, Fig. 3B). Comparing the full model with the partial models indicated that the spatial variables explained 74.1% of the total explainable genetic variance. Habitat variables explained 20.3% of the total variance and spatial and habitat variables had a joint effect of 5.6% on genetic variance. Among the three spatial variables, geographic location showed the longest vector along each RDA axis, explaining 46% of genetic variation (Fig. 3B).

Bottom Line: Here, we examine the effects of landscape matrix on population structure of the sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps) in a fragmented landscape in southeastern South Australia.We found evidence for female philopatry and restricted dispersal distances for females relative to males, suggesting there is male-biased dispersal.The permeability of a cleared agricultural matrix to dispersing gliders was significantly higher than that of a pine matrix, with the gliders dispersing shorter distances across the latter.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Natural Resources Isfahan University of Technology Isfahan 84156-83111 Iran ; School of Biological Sciences The University of Adelaide Adelaide SA 5005 Australia ; Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity The University of Adelaide Adelaide SA 5005 Australia.

ABSTRACT
Ongoing habitat loss and fragmentation is considered a threat to biodiversity as it can create small, isolated populations that are at increased risk of extinction. Tree-dependent species are predicted to be highly sensitive to forest and woodland loss and fragmentation, but few studies have tested the influence of different types of landscape matrix on gene flow and population structure of arboreal species. Here, we examine the effects of landscape matrix on population structure of the sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps) in a fragmented landscape in southeastern South Australia. We collected 250 individuals across 12 native Eucalyptus forest remnants surrounded by cleared agricultural land or exotic Pinus radiata plantations and a large continuous eucalypt forest. Fifteen microsatellite loci were genotyped and analyzed to infer levels of population differentiation and dispersal. Genetic differentiation among most forest patches was evident. We found evidence for female philopatry and restricted dispersal distances for females relative to males, suggesting there is male-biased dispersal. Among the environmental variables, spatial variables including geographic location, minimum distance to neighboring patch, and degree of isolation were the most important in explaining genetic variation. The permeability of a cleared agricultural matrix to dispersing gliders was significantly higher than that of a pine matrix, with the gliders dispersing shorter distances across the latter. Our results added to previous findings for other species of restricted dispersal and connectivity due to habitat fragmentation in the same region, providing valuable information for the development of strategies to improve the connectivity of populations in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus