Limits...
The impact of invasive cane toads on native wildlife in southern Australia.

Jolly CJ, Shine R, Greenlees MJ - Ecol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: The presence of cane toads was associated with lower faunal abundance and species richness, and a difference in species composition.The invasion of cane toads through temperate-zone Australia appears to have reduced populations of at least four anurophagous predators, facilitated other taxa, and decreased rates of scavenging.Our data identify a paradox: The impacts of cane toads are at least as devastating in southern Australia as in the tropics, yet we know far more about toad invasion in the sparsely populated wilderness areas of tropical Australia than in the densely populated southeastern seaboard.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences University of Sydney Sydney New South Wales 2006 Australia.

ABSTRACT
Commonly, invaders have different impacts in different places. The spread of cane toads (Rhinella marina: Bufonidae) has been devastating for native fauna in tropical Australia, but the toads' impact remains unstudied in temperate-zone Australia. We surveyed habitat characteristics and fauna in campgrounds along the central eastern coast of Australia, in eight sites that have been colonized by cane toads and another eight that have not. The presence of cane toads was associated with lower faunal abundance and species richness, and a difference in species composition. Populations of three species of large lizards (land mullets Bellatorias major, eastern water dragons Intellagama lesueurii, and lace monitors Varanus varius) and a snake (red-bellied blacksnake Pseudechis porphyriacus) were lower (by 84 to 100%) in areas with toads. The scarcity of scavenging lace monitors in toad-invaded areas translated into a 52% decrease in rates of carrion removal (based on camera traps at bait stations) and an increase (by 61%) in numbers of brush turkeys (Alectura lathami). The invasion of cane toads through temperate-zone Australia appears to have reduced populations of at least four anurophagous predators, facilitated other taxa, and decreased rates of scavenging. Our data identify a paradox: The impacts of cane toads are at least as devastating in southern Australia as in the tropics, yet we know far more about toad invasion in the sparsely populated wilderness areas of tropical Australia than in the densely populated southeastern seaboard.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A nonmetric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordination plot showing the composition of faunal assemblages sampled from toad‐present (solid circles) and toad‐absent (open circles) campground sites in northeastern New South Wales, Australia (stress = 0.13).
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588653&req=5

ece31657-fig-0003: A nonmetric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordination plot showing the composition of faunal assemblages sampled from toad‐present (solid circles) and toad‐absent (open circles) campground sites in northeastern New South Wales, Australia (stress = 0.13).

Mentions: We recorded 554 individual reptiles (of 14 species), 643 birds (of 10 species), and 250 mammals (of 10 species; see Supporting Information for Table S2). Combining counts for all native species, toad‐occupied areas contained 40% fewer animals (one‐way ANOVA: F1,14 = 6.20, P = 0.03; Fig. 2A) and 31% fewer species (F1,14 = 11.82, P = 0.004; Fig. 2B) than did areas without toads. The composition of faunal assemblages differed strongly between toad‐present and toad‐absent sites (ANOSIM: global R = 0.36, P = 0.005; 58% average dissimilarity; Fig. 3). Toad presence correlated with decreased abundances of three lizard species (lace monitors Varanus varius, Z = 3.35, P = 0.001; water dragons Intellagama lesueurii, Z = 3.03, P = 0.003; land mullets Bellatorias major, Kruskal–Wallis one‐way ANOVA: Z = 3.07, P = 0.002; Fig. 4A–C) and increased abundance of brush turkeys (Alectura lathami, Z = 2.28, P = 0.03; Fig. 4E). There was no overall difference in snake abundance between toad‐present and toad‐absent sites (MANOVA: Wilks' Lambda = 0.013, P = 0.67), but one species showed a significant effect: No red‐bellied blacksnakes Pseudechis porphyriacus were encountered in sites with toads, whereas they were found in most toad‐absent sites (Kruskal–Wallis one‐way ANOVA: Z = −2.14, P = 0.03; Fig. 4D).


The impact of invasive cane toads on native wildlife in southern Australia.

Jolly CJ, Shine R, Greenlees MJ - Ecol Evol (2015)

A nonmetric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordination plot showing the composition of faunal assemblages sampled from toad‐present (solid circles) and toad‐absent (open circles) campground sites in northeastern New South Wales, Australia (stress = 0.13).
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588653&req=5

ece31657-fig-0003: A nonmetric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordination plot showing the composition of faunal assemblages sampled from toad‐present (solid circles) and toad‐absent (open circles) campground sites in northeastern New South Wales, Australia (stress = 0.13).
Mentions: We recorded 554 individual reptiles (of 14 species), 643 birds (of 10 species), and 250 mammals (of 10 species; see Supporting Information for Table S2). Combining counts for all native species, toad‐occupied areas contained 40% fewer animals (one‐way ANOVA: F1,14 = 6.20, P = 0.03; Fig. 2A) and 31% fewer species (F1,14 = 11.82, P = 0.004; Fig. 2B) than did areas without toads. The composition of faunal assemblages differed strongly between toad‐present and toad‐absent sites (ANOSIM: global R = 0.36, P = 0.005; 58% average dissimilarity; Fig. 3). Toad presence correlated with decreased abundances of three lizard species (lace monitors Varanus varius, Z = 3.35, P = 0.001; water dragons Intellagama lesueurii, Z = 3.03, P = 0.003; land mullets Bellatorias major, Kruskal–Wallis one‐way ANOVA: Z = 3.07, P = 0.002; Fig. 4A–C) and increased abundance of brush turkeys (Alectura lathami, Z = 2.28, P = 0.03; Fig. 4E). There was no overall difference in snake abundance between toad‐present and toad‐absent sites (MANOVA: Wilks' Lambda = 0.013, P = 0.67), but one species showed a significant effect: No red‐bellied blacksnakes Pseudechis porphyriacus were encountered in sites with toads, whereas they were found in most toad‐absent sites (Kruskal–Wallis one‐way ANOVA: Z = −2.14, P = 0.03; Fig. 4D).

Bottom Line: The presence of cane toads was associated with lower faunal abundance and species richness, and a difference in species composition.The invasion of cane toads through temperate-zone Australia appears to have reduced populations of at least four anurophagous predators, facilitated other taxa, and decreased rates of scavenging.Our data identify a paradox: The impacts of cane toads are at least as devastating in southern Australia as in the tropics, yet we know far more about toad invasion in the sparsely populated wilderness areas of tropical Australia than in the densely populated southeastern seaboard.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences University of Sydney Sydney New South Wales 2006 Australia.

ABSTRACT
Commonly, invaders have different impacts in different places. The spread of cane toads (Rhinella marina: Bufonidae) has been devastating for native fauna in tropical Australia, but the toads' impact remains unstudied in temperate-zone Australia. We surveyed habitat characteristics and fauna in campgrounds along the central eastern coast of Australia, in eight sites that have been colonized by cane toads and another eight that have not. The presence of cane toads was associated with lower faunal abundance and species richness, and a difference in species composition. Populations of three species of large lizards (land mullets Bellatorias major, eastern water dragons Intellagama lesueurii, and lace monitors Varanus varius) and a snake (red-bellied blacksnake Pseudechis porphyriacus) were lower (by 84 to 100%) in areas with toads. The scarcity of scavenging lace monitors in toad-invaded areas translated into a 52% decrease in rates of carrion removal (based on camera traps at bait stations) and an increase (by 61%) in numbers of brush turkeys (Alectura lathami). The invasion of cane toads through temperate-zone Australia appears to have reduced populations of at least four anurophagous predators, facilitated other taxa, and decreased rates of scavenging. Our data identify a paradox: The impacts of cane toads are at least as devastating in southern Australia as in the tropics, yet we know far more about toad invasion in the sparsely populated wilderness areas of tropical Australia than in the densely populated southeastern seaboard.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus