Limits...
Mind the gap: treefalls as drivers of parental trade-offs.

Rojas B - Ecol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: Other factors associated with the invasion of fresh tree-fall gaps such as animal breeding adaptations have been largely neglected.I found that rearing sites are occupied sooner and tadpoles deposited at higher rates in fresh gaps than in the closed forest, but that the rate of cannibalism is also much greater in the former.These results highlight the importance of studying the earliest stages of invasions in order to have a better understanding of the composition of communities in disturbed ecosystems at later successional stages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological and Environmental Science Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions University of Jyvaskyla PO Box 35 Jyväskylä 40014 Finland ; Centre for Integrative Ecology School of Life and Environmental Sciences Deakin University at Waurn Ponds Pigdons Road Geelong Vic. 3217 Australia.

ABSTRACT
Tree-fall gaps are small-scale disturbances whose formation, colonization, and role in forest dynamics are well documented, but whose effects on animal ecology are still greatly overlooked, except for studies comparing species richness of gaps 6+ months old to that in the closed canopy. Other factors associated with the invasion of fresh tree-fall gaps such as animal breeding adaptations have been largely neglected. I studied the immediate (within hours and days) arrival of the poison frog Dendrobates tinctorius in new tree-fall gaps to examine the dynamics of their invasion in relation to tadpole rearing. I found that rearing sites are occupied sooner and tadpoles deposited at higher rates in fresh gaps than in the closed forest, but that the rate of cannibalism is also much greater in the former. This suggests that invading new tree-fall gaps can be the best parental decision when parents arrive early because they get access to fresh, high-quality resources, but it could be to the detriment of the offspring if parents arrive late, because of overcrowding and cannibalism. These results highlight the importance of studying the earliest stages of invasions in order to have a better understanding of the composition of communities in disturbed ecosystems at later successional stages.

No MeSH data available.


Difference in latency to occupancy (time taken until first tadpole was deposited) between bowls placed in the closed forest and bowls placed in fresh tree‐fall gaps. Boxes show the median and the 25th and 75th percentiles of data distribution. Vertical lines indicate data range, and filled and open circles denote extremes and outliers in data distribution, respectively.
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ece31648-fig-0002: Difference in latency to occupancy (time taken until first tadpole was deposited) between bowls placed in the closed forest and bowls placed in fresh tree‐fall gaps. Boxes show the median and the 25th and 75th percentiles of data distribution. Vertical lines indicate data range, and filled and open circles denote extremes and outliers in data distribution, respectively.

Mentions: Bowls placed within fresh tree‐fall gaps were occupied significantly sooner (within 3 days) than bowls in the closed forest (Cox hazard regression. Location: coef = 1.557 ± 0.606, z = 2.57, P = 0.01; Table 1; Fig. 2). Furthermore, tadpoles were deposited at a significantly higher rate in bowls located within fresh gaps than in those located in the closed forest (effect = 0.750 ± 0.256, t = 2.932, P = 0.013; Table 1; Fig. 3). Bowls within fresh gaps also reached a higher maximum (effect = 1.144 ± 0.348, z = 3.287, P = 0.001) and average (effect = 4.508 ± 1.748, t = 2.579, P = 0.023) number of tadpoles than bowls in the closed forest (Fig. 4).


Mind the gap: treefalls as drivers of parental trade-offs.

Rojas B - Ecol Evol (2015)

Difference in latency to occupancy (time taken until first tadpole was deposited) between bowls placed in the closed forest and bowls placed in fresh tree‐fall gaps. Boxes show the median and the 25th and 75th percentiles of data distribution. Vertical lines indicate data range, and filled and open circles denote extremes and outliers in data distribution, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588652&req=5

ece31648-fig-0002: Difference in latency to occupancy (time taken until first tadpole was deposited) between bowls placed in the closed forest and bowls placed in fresh tree‐fall gaps. Boxes show the median and the 25th and 75th percentiles of data distribution. Vertical lines indicate data range, and filled and open circles denote extremes and outliers in data distribution, respectively.
Mentions: Bowls placed within fresh tree‐fall gaps were occupied significantly sooner (within 3 days) than bowls in the closed forest (Cox hazard regression. Location: coef = 1.557 ± 0.606, z = 2.57, P = 0.01; Table 1; Fig. 2). Furthermore, tadpoles were deposited at a significantly higher rate in bowls located within fresh gaps than in those located in the closed forest (effect = 0.750 ± 0.256, t = 2.932, P = 0.013; Table 1; Fig. 3). Bowls within fresh gaps also reached a higher maximum (effect = 1.144 ± 0.348, z = 3.287, P = 0.001) and average (effect = 4.508 ± 1.748, t = 2.579, P = 0.023) number of tadpoles than bowls in the closed forest (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: Other factors associated with the invasion of fresh tree-fall gaps such as animal breeding adaptations have been largely neglected.I found that rearing sites are occupied sooner and tadpoles deposited at higher rates in fresh gaps than in the closed forest, but that the rate of cannibalism is also much greater in the former.These results highlight the importance of studying the earliest stages of invasions in order to have a better understanding of the composition of communities in disturbed ecosystems at later successional stages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological and Environmental Science Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions University of Jyvaskyla PO Box 35 Jyväskylä 40014 Finland ; Centre for Integrative Ecology School of Life and Environmental Sciences Deakin University at Waurn Ponds Pigdons Road Geelong Vic. 3217 Australia.

ABSTRACT
Tree-fall gaps are small-scale disturbances whose formation, colonization, and role in forest dynamics are well documented, but whose effects on animal ecology are still greatly overlooked, except for studies comparing species richness of gaps 6+ months old to that in the closed canopy. Other factors associated with the invasion of fresh tree-fall gaps such as animal breeding adaptations have been largely neglected. I studied the immediate (within hours and days) arrival of the poison frog Dendrobates tinctorius in new tree-fall gaps to examine the dynamics of their invasion in relation to tadpole rearing. I found that rearing sites are occupied sooner and tadpoles deposited at higher rates in fresh gaps than in the closed forest, but that the rate of cannibalism is also much greater in the former. This suggests that invading new tree-fall gaps can be the best parental decision when parents arrive early because they get access to fresh, high-quality resources, but it could be to the detriment of the offspring if parents arrive late, because of overcrowding and cannibalism. These results highlight the importance of studying the earliest stages of invasions in order to have a better understanding of the composition of communities in disturbed ecosystems at later successional stages.

No MeSH data available.